"A Nation in Pain: Healing Our Biggest Health Problem" - A Review

Resource "A Nation in Pain: Healing Our Biggest Health Problem" - A Review

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Cort submitted a new resource:

"A Nation in Pain: Healing Our Biggest Health Problem" - A Review - Judy Foreman's groundbreaking book on the problem of pain in America

“I will argue that lack of adequate pain control is one of the most urgent health problems in America.” Judy Foreman

The pain had come out of nowhere. At 50 she was a successful woman in a great relationship who swam competitively. She hadn’t experienced any injury, yet the burning, stabbing pain running from the back of her neck to her shoulder was driving her nuts.

She hadn’t known such pain was even possible. The slightest mistake – the slightest move in the wrong direction – could...
Read more about this resource...
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
Cort,

This was an excellent subject. As an individual suffering from one of the worst pain disorders known to man, I was very frightened at the opiophobia spreading across the US. The fear of under-treated pain adds to an already unbearable situation. I read online that many pain patients, especially vets were committing suicide. It is indefensible to take pain medications away from those in desperate need - especially to those who served the country. Addiction has multiple causes/ risk factors. There are responsible people in pain. You can't paint everyone with the same brush, or use a one-size-fits-all approach. I don't have the answers, but what is being done now is unconscionable and unworkable.

There is a new drug under development, that has the pain-relieving effects of opioids without the addiction potential: http://www.techtimes.com/articles/174097/20160817/new-drug-relieves-pain-like-morphine-but-does-not-cause-addiction-other-side-effects-linked-to-opioid-use.htm

Hopefully enough people will make their voices heard to help bring this medication to the market, as long as it has been deemed safe.

Even when I feel terrible I force myself to exercise. I research non-stop to try to help myself heal, so I believe being proactive is a must. I'd like to know more of what else Ms. Foreman did to get well. Knowing the paths others have taken, even if our path veers somewhat from theirs, can be valuable knowledge.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Thanks. Several new opioid drugs are under development. If they can solve the side effect issue and improve pain relief - that would obviously be a huge step forward. The market would be huge as well!

The right kind of targeted exercise from her physical therapist and at that boot camp turned out to be crucial. Reducing the castrophizing helped until she could get at the root of the problem. I don't know if any drugs really helped her.

Interestingly, she has the same bad neck that she did before and she's not in pain anymore. That's kind of amazing.
 
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cherubim

Well-Known Member
Yes - if those drugs pass muster, it would resolve many problems. I make myself go a long time before I take anything - so your article was right-on about people under-treating their own pain. I only accept the absolute minimal amount to get by. But I found the psychological factor comes into play: just knowing I have relief if I absolutely need it, helps me prolong times between treating the pain, while utilizing other therapies, such as meditation, prayer, journaling, exercise, concentrating on other things etc.

One thing that is disconcerting is that prolonged un-treated pain causes cortisol to be released into the blood, and this can wear out the adrenals. So not treating people's pain can have devastating consequences on body systems. But pain medication has it's own evils such as activation of glial cells, so it's best to get off as soon as one can.

That is interesting that she has the same bad neck but is not in pain. I wonder what the determining factor was. I would love to know what that factor was. Something she did worked. Finding the right doctor helps, but can be exhausting finding that one who has answers. Sometimes - not always - one's time seems better served searching for answers yourself, or seeking the paths others - laymen - have used to heal. The combined wisdom can sometimes yield pearls of great price.
 
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Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Yes - if those drugs pass muster, it would resolve many problems. I make myself go a long time before I take anything - so your article was right-on about people under-treating their own pain. I only accept the absolute minimal amount to get by. But I found the psychological factor comes into play: just knowing I have relief if I absolutely need it, helps me prolong times between treating the pain, while utilizing other therapies, such as meditation, prayer, journaling, exercise, concentrating on other things etc.

One thing that is disconcerting is that prolonged un-treated pain causes cortisol to be released into the blood, and this can wear out the adrenals. So not treating people's pain can have devastating consequences on body systems. But pain medication has it's own evils such as activation of glial cells, so it's best to get off as soon as one can.

That is interesting that she has the same bad neck but is not in pain. I wonder what the determining factor was. I would love to know what that factor was. Something she did worked. Finding the right doctor helps, but can be exhausting finding that one who has answers. Sometimes - not always - one's time seems better served searching for answers yourself, or seeking the paths others - laymen - have used to heal. The combined wisdom can sometimes yield pearls of great price.
Interesting about the cortisol - I didn't think about that. We know that mild hypocortisolism is present in ME/CFS.

And yes, anticipation turns out to be a really knotty issue in pain. It makes sense to me that having the body be even more of a fight/flight type response -which is surely already present in chronic pain - si going make things worse. That response releases pro-inflammatory chemicals that increase pain.

I think as strange as it sounds that the right physical therapy and the right neck exercises were what really helped. She describes going into the boot camp facility and seeing people using weights with their necks - she couldn't imagine that - but which indicated they were specifically exercising the damaged area.
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
Knotty issue is right! I'm sure it does heavily contribute to fight/flight, intensifying that response. I didn't know the response itself churned out pro-inflammatory chemicals. I'm taking a lot of anti-inflammatories now, and trying to find potent Nrf2 activators to activate the body's own antioxidants.

Her story was encouraging. It gives hope that you too will find your way out of a bad place.
 

Krizani

New Member
There is a wonderful book about the origins of the current attitude and policies concerning drugs. It's called Chasing The Scream by Johann Hari. He traveled all over the world to get this story and it's very well written. The book is full of compassion and hope.

When I read it many pieces fell into place for me and it has changed how I look at this issue, even though I deal with an intractable headache for years at a time and control it with relatively small amounts of opioids which works well, the best of any of the zillions of things I've tried. I do not develop tolerance, and I am in no way an addict. When the pain stops I simply forget the drugs are even in the house. This has happened three times now.

My struggle to get compassionate care has reached true depths of craziness and it helps to understand why there is so much outright insanity around this issue.
https://www.amazon.com/Chasing-Scream-First-Last-Drugs/dp/1620408910/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1474563118&sr=1-1&keywords=chasing+the+scream
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
There is a wonderful book about the origins of the current attitude and policies concerning drugs. It's called Chasing The Scream by Johann Hari. He traveled all over the world to get this story and it's very well written. The book is full of compassion and hope.

When I read it many pieces fell into place for me and it has changed how I look at this issue, even though I deal with an intractable headache for years at a time and control it with relatively small amounts of opioids which works well, the best of any of the zillions of things I've tried. I do not develop tolerance, and I am in no way an addict. When the pain stops I simply forget the drugs are even in the house. This has happened three times now.

My struggle to get compassionate care has reached true depths of craziness and it helps to understand why there is so much outright insanity around this issue.
https://www.amazon.com/Chasing-Scream-First-Last-Drugs/dp/1620408910/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1474563118&sr=1-1&keywords=chasing+the+scream
Thanks for the tip on the book Krizani...
 

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