Feeling better with high iodine doses

djk1

Member
Since 5 weeks I've been taking about 100 mg iodine a day -almost 700 times the 150 μg/day RDA- as suggested by dr Brownstein and other doctors from the iodine project. You can find all their research here: https://www.optimox.com/iodine-research. Brownstein also wrote a book about it: https://www.amazon.com/Iodine-Need-Cant-Live-Without/dp/0966088239
Within a few days I started feeling better: more relaxed, comfortable, stronger and having more energy. I noticed standing isn't so tiring anymore and if needed I can do it for hours. Also less PEM. According to Brownstein & co it takes about 2 months at 100 mg a day to become iodine sufficient. So I'll continue another month and go from there.
As advised I checked my thyroid blood levels last week. As expected TSH was increased. This is needed to rebuild the so-called NIS (sodium iodine symporter) to take up ioidine from the blood into cells.
I'm using Lugol's solution at 7% so 8,75 mg per drop. Started with 1 drop and gradually increased it to 4 drops 3 times a day in a glass of water. As advised I also take about a teaspoon Celtic sea salt a day, 400 mg magnesium and plenty of selenium and zinc.
Only side effect I noticed where some headache periods every now and then with loose stools. They say it's probably detoxification of bromide, fluoride and possibly heavy metals like mercury as well.

Anyone else here tried high iodine doses?
 
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pamojja

Active Member
I took in average about 15mg per day the last 14 years. At times up to 28mg.

However, I took many many other things, and therefore can't relate my remissions (PAD, COPD, T2D, PEMs..) to any one nutrient alone.
 

jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
High dose of Iodine I would NOT do. I've been taking Iosol drops, 1-2 most days for probably 15 yrs or more...and 1 drop is 1.83mg.

I can't imagine taking the high dose.
 

djk1

Member
High dose of Iodine I would NOT do. I've been taking Iosol drops, 1-2 most days for probably 15 yrs or more...and 1 drop is 1.83mg.

I can't imagine taking the high dose.
According to those doctors we need about 13 mg a day. And even higher doses of iodine may be necessary in our toxic environment (bromine, fluorine, heavy metals).
Why would you NOT do that? Don't you know or trust the experience of dr Brownstein & co with thousands of their patients? And generations of doctors from 1880 to 1950 with millions of patients?
Been doing it for 7 weeks now and I'm only getting better.
 

djk1

Member
I took in average about 15mg per day the last 14 years. At times up to 28mg.

However, I took many many other things, and therefore can't relate my remissions (PAD, COPD, T2D, PEMs..) to any one nutrient alone.
Did you cure your ME/CFS? Or how much did you improve your symptoms?
 

pamojja

Active Member
Did you cure your ME/CFS? Or how much did you improve your symptoms?

Due to my PAD (due to 80% stenosis at my abdominal aorta), which caused a 60% walking-disabiilty), COPD and T2D I'm not as much a clear cut ME/CFS. But more secondary, as with cancer patients. Also wouldn't talk about cures, but remissions only.

In my case, whenever working more than ~4 hrs, or slept less than 10, I always got backpain, concentration difficulties, and extreme exhaustion. Which wouldn't ease as long as I didn't completely rest a full day or more, doing nothing.

Since I worked part-time during the week and an other during weekend, that basicaly meant continous PEMs.

A part of my remission from constant PEM also came from quitting the job during the week, or much better pacing. Still took some years to take effect after that change. So now I still feel better not going above/below my 4/10 hours limits - but no more protracted beyond that day.

Funnily I've never got a official diagnosis of ME/CFS, since I gave up after countless insuccessful addempts in finding a specialist who knew about. Only after being stripped of my 60% walking-disabilty, I asked for an other official evaluation at a time my PEMs were still disabling (actually 2 different MDs by the government), and due to my records and documentation of all my symptoms both came to the conclusion I'm still only able to work part-time, and now got a 50% physical disabilty on account of ME/CFS (since all other diagnosis at that time in remission).

3 years later constant PEMs ceased completely.
 

jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
According to those doctors we need about 13 mg a day. And even higher doses of iodine may be necessary in our toxic environment (bromine, fluorine, heavy metals).
Why would you NOT do that? Don't you know or trust the experience of dr Brownstein & co with thousands of their patients? And generations of doctors from 1880 to 1950 with millions of patients?
Been doing it for 7 weeks now and I'm only getting better.

My last iodine test a couple yrs ago I was too high...so I'm thinking of that.

I take 1 grain NP Thyroid med and the 1-2 drops Iosol just about daily and I won't take
more iodine. I work on eating more salmon and other seafoods...

There is NOT a set amount the same for everyone...

Get your Iodine levels tested and see where you are, it's a urine test.
 
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JES

Active Member
According to those doctors we need about 13 mg a day. And even higher doses of iodine may be necessary in our toxic environment (bromine, fluorine, heavy metals).
Why would you NOT do that? Don't you know or trust the experience of dr Brownstein & co with thousands of their patients? And generations of doctors from 1880 to 1950 with millions of patients?
Been doing it for 7 weeks now and I'm only getting better.

The question is rather, why would I trust any random doctor unless he has scientific evidence to back up his claims? Any notion that the body needs 13 mg is ridiculous, simply for the reason that no diet in human history has provided such high iodine content. The traditional Japanese diet provides probably the world's highest iodine intake and it is estimated to be around 1-3 mg per day at most. Therefore, there is no physiological or evolutionary reason why we would "need" 13 mg.

It is true that some diets today are quite iodine deficient, so supplementing *some* is probably a good idea. I had a very interesting response to iodine. At first, it felt like it kickstarted my metabolism and typical ME/CFS symptoms were reduced. A week or so later, I lost most of the initial benefits, like it tends to happen for most supplements for me. And yeah, I did a urine test and it was quite low.
 

pamojja

Active Member
However, I took many many other things, and therefore can't relate my remissions (PAD, COPD, T2D, PEMs..) to any one nutrient alone.
Any notion that the body needs 13 mg is ridiculous, simply for the reason that no diet in human history has provided such high iodine content.

My remissions have also been redicolous, since according to science no thing would put PAD or COPD into remission, but one would have to die from it.

So are the ridicoulous high amounds of nutrients I took to this effect, never before provided with natural diet. Fine with me :D
 

jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
IT's hard to grasp and understand why Idoral comes in such a HIGH dose and Iosol which I take is low dose
of 1.83mg. per drop and most days I take 1 drop and some days 2 drops...but no higher.

One can now buy 6.25mg Idoral tabs, I will stick with my Iosol 1.83mg -- 1 or 2 drops daily.
 
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djk1

Member
The question is rather, why would I trust any random doctor unless he has scientific evidence to back up his claims? Any notion that the body needs 13 mg is ridiculous, simply for the reason that no diet in human history has provided such high iodine content. The traditional Japanese diet provides probably the world's highest iodine intake and it is estimated to be around 1-3 mg per day at most. Therefore, there is no physiological or evolutionary reason why we would "need" 13 mg.

It is true that some diets today are quite iodine deficient, so supplementing *some* is probably a good idea. I had a very interesting response to iodine. At first, it felt like it kickstarted my metabolism and typical ME/CFS symptoms were reduced. A week or so later, I lost most of the initial benefits, like it tends to happen for most supplements for me. And yeah, I did a urine test and it was quite low.
The iodine doctors were lead by dr Guy Abraham, not your average random doctor. According to their research the Japanese get about 13 mg from their diet. They may be wrong though, will check it out.

Still, if it's just 1-3 mg that's no proof that we wouldn't thrive with more. Especially given the unprecedented toxic loads of bromine and fluorine, both halides like iodine that necessitate higher intakes than ever before.
And do we really know how much iodine was in our ancestor's diet throughout evolution? Early humans lived near the sea and seafood is rich in iodine. They may have gotten much more than present day Japanese.
And anyway, evolution is about surviving long enough to reproduce and bring up offspring, not about getting older than 40 healthily. Supposing that's what you're aspiring, the evolutionary perspective is irrelevant.
 
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jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
Too high, there is a range and that's how I was told high, I could see it was out of range....if one
believes the labs and ranges etc.....I don't know but I trust some people some times.

A friend said she read in one of her health books if a person has a dripping nose, the iodine
level is high. I've had that dripping in recent times.
 

JES

Active Member
There are a couple of different estimates on the Japanese diet intake indeed, but the more frequent ones have lowered the number from the 13 mg ballpark to 1-3 mg (source). There was also another study that I can't find right now that estimated the median intake to be 1 mg, but even that was from a traditional Japanese diet, which is not consumed anymore by most people in Japan.

The only way you reach the iodine amounts of the traditional Japanese diets is basically by eating lots of seaweed. Not even fish is anywhere close to as high on the chart of iodine content. I guess we can always speculate about more being healthy, but then it's indeed not based on any evolutionary history or common use and should be considered experimental.

I have no idea why iodine would be particularly helpful to counteract bromide or fluoride as I have never come across this claim. However, I do know that high doses of iodine can mess with your thyroid hormones. Why is a high TSH indicative of sodium iodide symporter needed to be built up? It looks like the sodium iodide symporter is actually responsible for transporting iodide into the thyroid gland. So if anything, once that is built up, you would get even more iodide into your thyroid, thus potentially disrupting the thyroid hormones and TSH further.
 

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