Mast cell mediators: Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
Mast cell mediators: Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)

Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is the predominant prostaglandin product released by mast cells. It is found prevalently in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, where it performs both inflammatory and normal processes. In the brain, PGD2 helps to regulate sleep and pain perception. PGD2 can be further broken down into other prostaglandins, including PGF2a; 9a, 11b-PGF2a (a different shape of PGF2a), and forms of PGJ. 9a, 11b-PGF2a shares the same biological functions as PGD2. Both of these can be tested for in 24 hour urine test as markers of mast cell disease.

PGD2 is a strong bronchoconstrictor. It is 10.2x more potent in this capacity than histamine and 3.5x more potent than PGF2a. It has been associated with inflammatory and atopic conditions for many years. Presence of allergen activates PGD2 production in sensitized people. In asthmatics, bronchial samples can achieve over 150x the level of PGD2 compared to controls. Elevated PGD2 has been associated with chronic coughing.

PGD2 is a driver of inflammation in many settings. It acts on bronchial epithelium to cause production of chemokines and cytokines. It also brings lymphocytes and eosinophils to the airway, which induces airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthmatics. PGD2 may also inhibit eosinophil cell death, resulting in further inflammation.

An interesting facet of PGD2 is its role in nerve pain. It has been found that PGD2 is produced by microglia in the spine after a peripheral nerve injury. These cells make more COX-1, which then makes PGD2. Newer COX-2 inhibiting NSAIDs do not affect nerve pain in mouse models, but older NSAIDs that inhibit COX-1 and COX-2 reduce neuropathy.

PGD2 is found to inhibit inflammation in other settings. It can reduce eosinophilia in allergic inflammation in mouse models. Additionally, once the acute phase of inflammation is over and it is resolving, administering a COX-2 inhibitor actually makes the inflammation worse. This indicates that PGD2 may be important in resolving inflammation in some processes.

Aspirin is commonly used in mast cell patients to inhibit prostaglandin production. PGD2 is primarily manufactured by COX-2, but the pathway that evokes neuropathy uses COX-1. There are a number of COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors available.

In mast cell patients, PGD2 is probably most well known for causing flushing. This happens due to dilation of blood vessels in the skin. Due to a well characterized response to aspirin, this is generally the first line medication choice. Some salicylate sensitive mast cell patients undergo aspirin desensitization to be able to use this medication.



References
http://www.mastattack.org/2015/04/mast-cell-mediators-prostaglandin-d2-pgd2/
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
If you have MCAS, be careful with aspirin. The idea behind it is to cause a small mast cell degranulation to avoid a big "dump". Some of us can't handle the trickle release and find we can't use aspirin. However if you can, it also will help with the too thick blood that goes along with it for many.

Issie
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
I've got some coming so I'll take it slow. I'm noticing a huge benefit with quercetin which I just started.

I'm on to something for sure. Oh some tests show my blood is thick but not like sludge.
 

Remy

Administrator
Blocking prostaglandins with aspirin has been very helpful for me personally. Thankfully I tolerate it well.

I do think taking some Vit K2 with aspirin is a good idea though.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I've got some coming so I'll take it slow. I'm noticing a huge benefit with quercetin which I just started.

I'm on to something for sure. Oh some tests show my blood is thick but not like sludge.
Are you taking heparin? Dr. Holtorf calls it the ace in his toolkit - says it often works really well.

Good luck the quercetin...I think I will put a mast cell mediator on my supplement list with Prohealth
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
Are you taking heparin? Dr. Holtorf calls it the ace in his toolkit - says it often works really well.

Good luck the quercetin...I think I will put a mast cell mediator on my supplement list with Prohealth
No doc to give me heparin at the moment but my NP knows about working on inflammation.

I will say my shoulder pain is gone since being on quercetin. Now I have to figure out food allergies. I never paid attention but I need to figure out why I crash after I eat breakfast.
 

Remy

Administrator
Are you taking heparin? Dr. Holtorf calls it the ace in his toolkit - says it often works really well.
I'm pretty sure Afrin uses the low molecular weight heparin, not the regular, but I'd have to double check that.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Turmeric and Ginger also helps with inflammation and can also thin the blood. Both are helpful for me.

Issie
 

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