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How to Gain Weight

For the too skinny among us

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    This resource is not on chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) but it does deal with a significant problem that some people with ME/CFS have - an inability to gain weight. Being too skinny means not having all the resources needed to produce energy and maintain health. Some anecdotal reports suggest that people with severe ME/CFS tend to be skinnier than those with less severe ME/CFS.

    The article points out that if you're having trouble gaining weight, your metabolic set point may have changed or perhaps you have a parasite. If your metabolic set point is a problem, you're going to have to "outsmart" your system to gain weight, and it will give you some ideas how.

    This article won't help for those who can't because of food sensitivities or gut issues; it simply presents a common-sense approach to gaining weight that may or may not help people with ME/CFS.

    You can ignore the section on exercise but the article does suggest some supplements that might help, foods to eat (some surprises there), foods to avoid (no junk food interestingly enough) and dietary strategies (no water with meals, eat proteins first).

    Check out some other home remedies from the same website that might help fight fatigue.

    Home Remedies that Help Fight Chronic Fatigue

    With chronic fatigue syndrome, the fatigue experienced by patients may worsen with physical or mental activity, but sadly, does not improve with rest. Real energy comes from properly supporting the body with nutrients and not with chemicals, sugar and caffeine.

    Alternative medicines can be used to help fatigue but it is difficult to determine if these therapies work, partly because chronic fatigue syndrome often responds to placebos. Those affected by chronic fatigue syndrome should instead be referred to a health practitioner for treatment. In addition, there are some home remedies that can help fight fatigue, a few of which we will discuss here.

    Potato Water

    According to Michael Greger M.D. FACM in his blog post on Nutrition Facts, 98% of American diets are potassium deficient. Potato Water is simply a drink rich in potassium from the water that potatoes are boiled in. Potassium is an essential macromineral most commonly derived from foods as it is not produced by the body. The primary functions of potassium in the body include regulating fluid balance and controlling the electrical activity of the heart and other muscles. With magnesium, it acts as an electrolyte essential for the proper functioning of our cells and the release of energy which relieves fatigue.

    Ginseng

    Ginseng is fairly well known in Chinese herbal medicine. It has therapeutic properties and is used to treat a number of ailments including the lowering of stress and the stimulation of physical and mental activity among people who are weak and tired.

    Citrus Drinks

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    Citrus fruits contain flavonoids and vitamin C, both of which alleviate a constant feeling of exhaustion or weariness. Lemons, limes, and grapefruits, contain an abundance of phytochemicals that makes them an effective form of stress-relieving aromatherapy. Citrus fruits are also a rich source of potassium, which provides energy for a body that is fighting fatigue. The hydration of water in citrus drinks will also dramatically improve your health.

    Peppermint Oil

    Peppermint oil’s scent invigorates the mind and senses, while inspiring a sense of peace. When your day is dragging through a workout, class, or work, enjoy some Peppermint oil benefits by applying it to your head and neck or put two drops on a tissue and breathe it deeply through your nose. The refreshing aroma will give you a boost of positivity.

    You can also add two drops of peppermint oil to bathwater along with four drops of rosemary oil for an invigorating soak. The strong scent will spur your brain to wake up due to the additional stimuli.

    Cordyceps sinensis

    Cordyceps sinensis has been described as a medicine in old Chinese medical books and Tibetan medicine. It is a rare combination of a caterpillar and a fungus and found at altitudes above 3,800 metres in Sikkim. The fungus is a tonic that can be taken on its own or mixed with other herbs. It is also found in tea or capsule form and can be purchased from health shops. Traditional healers in Sikkim recommend the fungus as a tonic, because they claim that it improves energy, appetite, stamina, libido, endurance and sleeping patterns.

    Eleutherococcus Tinctures

    Eleuthero Tinctures comes from the root of the Siberian plant Eleuthero, which has been used for the last 2000 years to provide energy and vitality. Whether it be in supporting your body’s stress or immune response, eleuthero is well-suited for helping you tap into your deepest inner resources and is recommended for people suffering with adrenal fatigue and/or insomnia. The tinctures vary in concentration and potency, so read the label instructions carefully.

    Yoghurt

    Yoghurt contains a high amount of protein, carbohydrates and gut-healthy probiotics which are processed by the body more quickly than any solid food. Low in calories and packed with calcium and live bacterial culture, the ingredients can help fight symptoms of fatigue and as a snack, it works as a quick energy boost. Greek yoghurt is strained extensively to remove much of the liquid whey, lactose, and sugar, giving it its thick consistency and in roughly the same amount of calories, can pack up to double the protein, while cutting sugar content by half. Add a chopped banana which is full of potassium and you have a healthy energy packed meal.


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