'A new anatomical understanding of how movement controls the body’s stress response system'

Remy

Administrator
Or it's all connected!

I really liked the part about how the HPA (adrenals) axis has been conventionally visualized as linear and hierarchical, but it's really not that way at all.

It's a great article and one that should provoke some interesting questions for our population where movement is challenging. It's an article from the Atlantic and not filled with a lot of scientific jargon.

http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/cortical-adrenal-orchestra/496679/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits
 
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Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Or it's all connected!

I really liked the part about how the HPA (adrenals) axis has been conventionally visualized as linear and hierarchical, but it's really not that way at all.

It's a great article and one that should provoke some interesting questions for our population where movement is challenging. It's an article from the Atlantic and not filled with a lot of scientific jargon.

http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/cortical-adrenal-orchestra/496679/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits
I think that's fascinating. Nancy Klimas says that when her patients get better they start to stand taller. She saw me when I was doing better and she immediately knew it because I was standing taller. How she figured out given that I'm actually in the same room with her once every couple of years I have no idea.

The motor areas in the brain connect to the adrenal glands. In the primary motor cortex of the brain, there’s a map of the human body—areas that correspond to the face, arm, and leg area, as well as a region that controls the axial body muscles (known to many people now as “the core”).

The Pitt team didn't think the primary motor cortex would control the adrenal medulla at all. But there are a whole lot of neurons there that do. And when you look at where those neurons are located, most are in the axial muscle part of that cortex.

“Something about axial control has an impact on stress responses,” Strick reasons. “There’s all this evidence that core strengthening has an impact on stress. And when you see somebody that's depressed or stressed out, you notice changes in their posture. When you stand up straight, it has an effect on how you project yourself and how you feel. Well, lo and behold, core muscles have an impact on stress. And I suspect that if you activate core muscles inappropriately with poor posture, that’s going to have an impact on stress.”
 

rebar

Active Member
Yes a very good read, 6 months ago I started to incorporate modest, and I mean modest yoga positions in my daily routine.
Four positions, downward dog, child's pose, cat cow, upright half moon. All that took no more than 3 minutes.
What I did was the easiest less stressful approach I could manage. It corresponded with a little better phase.
Alas, I crashed, it may or may not have contributed, but after reading the Atlantic article, I believe I'll start again.
 
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Veet

Well-Known Member
Nancy Klimas says that when her patients get better they start to stand taller.
I definitely stand taller when I'm feeling better. When I'm feeling poorly, I tend to hunch. Reminding myself to stand upright doesn't really work at those times.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
How many times we read body posture to get a feel and understanding of a person or situation. Makes sense our own posture portrays an image both external and internal.

Issie
 

TJ_Fitz

Well-Known Member
Or it's all connected!

I really liked the part about how the HPA (adrenals) axis has been conventionally visualized as linear and hierarchical, but it's really not that way at all.

It's a great article and one that should provoke some interesting questions for our population where movement is challenging. It's an article from the Atlantic and not filled with a lot of scientific jargon.

http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/cortical-adrenal-orchestra/496679/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits
Nice to see this kind of science!
 

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