Ampligen TLR3?

Mats Lindström

Active Member
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of proteins that play a key role in the unspecific immune system
Just TLR3 is critical for targeting by viruses and tumor cells. TLR3 increases the interferon level so the macrophages will start up (eating bacteria). Additionally affect; TLR3 protein increase kinase (p68) positive, which is reported to decrease the tumor formation. Ampligen is expected to increase TLR3-level.

Why have some lower levels of TLR3?
What are the triggers? Can people with CFS / ME have different conditions to resist these triggers? Could it be so simple that you can check it up in your DNA-profile? If there are discrepancies in the TLR3 gene, you might be more easily affected by CFS / ME, fibromyalgia and other diseases?

There are several medications, and even natural remedies that are immunomodulatory and can be used against viruses and cancer. TLR3 protein seems to be particularly important significance. Besides Ampligen, I have found two drugs which increases the level of TLR3: InvivoGen and RGC100.

The question is; what makes that some people have lower levels of TLR3? What are the triggers? Do people have different conditions to resist these triggers?

Check your DNA
It would be very interesting for all of us who made the DNA-test (23andme) if you click on this link and log in. Take a screenshot and post it in the thread, so we can compare.

This is my wifes result. What does it mean?
TLR3.png


Thank you!
Mats from Sweden, my wife has severe CFS / ME
 
Last edited:

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of proteins that play a key role in the unspecific immune system
Just TLR3 is critical for targeting by viruses and tumor cells. TLR3 increases the interferon level so the macrophages will start up (eating bacteria). Additionally affect; TLR3 protein increase kinase (p68) positive, which is reported to decrease the tumor formation. Ampligen is expected to increase TLR3-level.

Why have some lower levels of TLR3?
What are the triggers? Can people with CFS / ME have different conditions to resist these triggers? Could it be so simple that you can check it up in your DNA-profile? If there are discrepancies in the TLR3 gene, you might be more easily affected by CFS / ME, fibromyalgia and other diseases?

There are several medications, and even natural remedies that are immunomodulatory and can be used against viruses and cancer. TLR3 protein seems to be particularly important significance. Besides Ampligen, I have found two drugs which increases the level of TLR3: InvivoGen and RGC100.

The question is; what makes that some people have lower levels of TLR3? What are the triggers? Do people have different conditions to resist these triggers?

Check your DNA
It would be very interesting for all of us who made the DNA-test (23andme) if you click on this link and log in. Take a screenshot and post it in the thread, so we can compare.

This is my wifes result. What does it mean?
View attachment 904

Thank you!
Mats from Sweden, my wife has severe CFS / ME
That's great Matt. I'm going to do the 23andME test. I will post my results when I get it....
 

Remy

Administrator
It isn't bad to be homozygous unless it is the risk allele. I think it makes this clearer on the desktop version. I'll look tomorrow.

image.png
 

Remy

Administrator
It isn't bad to be homozygous unless it is the risk allele. I think it makes this clearer on the desktop version. I'll look tomorrow.

View attachment 906
@Mats Lindström, All of mine are the "normal" genotype. Your wife has some mutations but as to what it all means, I don't know. People tend to read a LOT more into SNPs than is supported by the science at this point.

If you click on the little plus sign on the non-mobile version, it will show the dbSNP genotype and the orientation. You have to remember that sometimes they look at one strand of the DNA or the matching strand and so the orientation (plus or minus) is also listed. So for example, rs5743309 could be A or C, and AA is the normal genotype. That is the plus orientation and could also be called TT (because A and T go together and C and G go together) in the minus orientation. It's the same thing though.

Also under the little plus sign, there is a section of references where you can click to find out what the science has to say about it so far. So I would start with the ones that your wife has mutations on and then read the references to see if it sheds any light on the situation for her.
 

Thom

Member
No clue what any of mine mean. Don't even know what a mutation is really. Genetics is the area of science and ME that I know the least amount on.
TLR3Gene.jpeg
 

Mats Lindström

Active Member
@Mats Lindström, All of mine are the "normal" genotype. Your wife has some mutations but as to what it all means, I don't know. People tend to read a LOT more into SNPs than is supported by the science at this point.

If you click on the little plus sign on the non-mobile version, it will show the dbSNP genotype and the orientation. You have to remember that sometimes they look at one strand of the DNA or the matching strand and so the orientation (plus or minus) is also listed. So for example, rs5743309 could be A or C, and AA is the normal genotype. That is the plus orientation and could also be called TT (because A and T go together and C and G go together) in the minus orientation. It's the same thing though.

Also under the little plus sign, there is a section of references where you can click to find out what the science has to say about it so far. So I would start with the ones that your wife has mutations on and then read the references to see if it sheds any light on the situation for her.
@Remy Great! Thank you very much. I did not have any idea about that!
 

Get Our Free ME/CFS and FM Blog!



New Threads

Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Shopping on Amazon.com For HR

Latest Resources

Top