Could This Potential Game-Changer For Concussion Prevention Help pwME/CFS (?)

Wayne

Well-Known Member
I just watched this 3-minute news segment on CBS News last night. Quite fascinating in and of itself, but I couldn't help but wonder if this new (and simple) device (collar) might help some of the brain circulation and cognitive issues for pwME/CFS.

Here's a LINK to the entire transcript...
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Bailes replicated that with a collar for humans that gently presses the vein like a necktie, reducing blood flow out of the brain. That creates a backflow, about a teaspoon of extra blood, making a tighter fit in the skull.

 

bobby

Well-Known Member
that is really interesting... And a very obvious difference between the brain scans of football players wearing the collar vs the ones not wearing it.

I wonder if one teaspoon of extra blood would be enough to enhance our cognitive function though... And we would have to wear it all the time vs players only wear it for the duration of a game.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I just watched this 3-minute news segment on CBS News last night. Quite fascinating in and of itself, but I couldn't help but wonder if this new (and simple) device (collar) might help some of the brain circulation and cognitive issues for pwME/CFS.

Here's a LINK to the entire transcript...
.......................................................

Bailes replicated that with a collar for humans that gently presses the vein like a necktie, reducing blood flow out of the brain. That creates a backflow, about a teaspoon of extra blood, making a tighter fit in the skull.

That IS interesting... It's only a teaspoon but it would be interesting to see if a teaspoon had an effect..Blood volume is surely low in ME.CFS patients brains.

Bailes and his partners were inspired by the woodpecker. It slams its head more than 80 million times over its lifetime without concussions.

The bird's long tongue wraps around its head, compressing the jugular vein.

Bailes replicated that with a collar for humans that gently presses the vein like a necktie, reducing blood flow out of the brain. That creates a backflow, about a teaspoon of extra blood, making a tighter fit in the skull.

Bailes says it's like bubble wrap for the brain -- and there's no downside that doctors know of to increasing the volume of blood inside the skull.

Maybe if they just cinched it up a bit tighter for people with ME/CFS :playful:
 

Wayne

Well-Known Member
Bailes and his partners were inspired by the woodpecker. It slams its head more than 80 million times over its lifetime without concussions.
Yeah, I thought that was quite interesting as well. -- I have a new-found respect for the woodpecker! :)
 

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