Cure: A Journey Into The Science Of Mind Over Body.

bobby

Well-Known Member
We wonder whether it might be problems of the brain centres that control the autonomic nervous system, so they are areas in the brain stem, whether or not it might be an abnormality of the hypothalamic pituitary axis, so how hormones are produced and the impact that they might have on the vascular system. Or alternatively it could be that the autonomic nervous system is having difficulties regulating the cardiovascular system and that the symptoms of autonomic dysfunction arise as a consequence of that.
I always feel like we don't have enough knowledge about the brain to be able to confidently say that something stems from a problem in the brain - it's great as a hypothesis, but can it become anything more than that without a firm base in factual proof? I personally feel like the Scheibenbogen paper from last year explains our autonomic dysfunction in a way that is more realistic, in the sense that they have actually been able to trace antibodies. (I'm aware that this needs to be repeated before this information becomes actually useful though...)
Scheibenbogen paper said:
Infection-triggered disease onset, chronic immune activation and autonomic dysregulation in CFS point to an autoimmune disease directed against neurotransmitter receptors. Autoantibodies against G-protein coupled receptors were shown to play a pathogenic role in several autoimmune diseases.
 

Folk

Well-Known Member
On that subject of calming our nervous system I always wonder...
You'd probably had to give up movies and fiction books right? As our brains can't diferentiate reallity from fantasy it certainly mess with the nervous system.
I always see those studies "your brain on porn" and is never good lol
 

bobby

Well-Known Member
On that subject of calming our nervous system I always wonder...
You'd probably had to give up movies and fiction books right?
I've had to give up on anything scary/negative/sad... I go downhill quick if I do watch something like that... Never knew that it's because our brain can't differentiate between reality and fiction... crazy! :nailbiting:
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
While serious meditation, and I mean like serious like 4 hours a day (Forest Thai Tradition), reduced a lot of my symptoms, it by no means cured me.
Mediation, like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, reduces stress which reduces our overall oxidative stress burden. But until you understand the soure of your oxidative stress, both from your genetic nature and your environment, the struggle will continue.

When I saw my oxidative stress was a result on my slow Monoamine Oxidase genes and I took Flavin Mononucleotide to increase its activity, only then was I was cured.

Each of us will have different sources of oxidative stress which is why no "protocol" will work for everyone, and may do harm to one person while helping another. But it is true, that relaxation techniques are good for everybody so by all means, chill!
 

Folk

Well-Known Member
While serious meditation, and I mean like serious like 4 hours a day (Forest Thai Tradition), reduced a lot of my symptoms, it by no means cured me.
Mediation, like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, reduces stress which reduces our overall oxidative stress burden. But until you understand the soure of your oxidative stress, both from your genetic nature and your environment, the struggle will continue.

When I saw my oxidative stress was a result on my slow Monoamine Oxidase genes and I took Flavin Mononucleotide to increase its activity, only then was I was cured.

Each of us will have different sources of oxidative stress which is why no "protocol" will work for everyone, and may do harm to one person while helping another. But it is true, that relaxation techniques are good for everybody so by all means, chill!
So... you are cured now?
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
Yes. Well a better way to say it, I know how to balance my issues. Cure to me would mean I do not need any assistance. My issues are not gone, just controlled. Since i still need to take FMN and Biotin I do not consider that a cure technically. But I have no side effects from my treatment, which I think would be considered a cure.
 

IrisRV

Well-Known Member
@Folk, you might want to check out this thread which Croatoan started today. He says he had a complete recovery, lists his treatments, and describes his symptoms in detail so the rest of us can decide whether his symptom set is enough like ours that his treatment plan will help us. Very complete.

His symptoms aren't much like mine, so it's probably not for me, but it might be helpful for people closer to his subset.
 
Last edited:

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
@Folk, you might want to check out this thread which Coatoan started today. He says he had a complete recovery, lists his treatments, and describes his symptoms in detail so the recent of us can decide whether his symptom set is enough like ours that his treatment plan will help us. Very complete.

His symptoms aren't much like mine, so it's probably not for me, but it might be helpful for people closer to his subset.
I want to stress that no one should mimic any one elses treatment plan! We are all genetically and environmentally unique. It takes understanding your genetics and your lifestyle. This is what Nutritional Genomics and personalized medicine is all about.

There are several different sources of anxiety for example, one may call for B6, another for B2.
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
I got immense benefit following Croatoan's recommendation for FMN form of B2. Decreased my need for antioxidants, virtually eliminated my histamine issues.
Hey Veet, glad to hear!

I want to ask you, do you have any issues with sleep still? I am changing my thinking a bit, and I think we might do with a little less FMN and take so w more magnesium.

The one issue I had left is waking up at 4am like I drank a bunch of coffee and I am pretty sure it calls for magnesium. Will let you know tomorrow. Added 150mg 3x a day.
 

Veet

Well-Known Member
My sleep is so good, unbelievable, as someone who chased sleep most of my life. I take 3x Mg malate 1300mg AM and PM. That is, 600mg elemental mg. This amount has been stable for at least a year. I've always awakened at dawn, I structure my day to give me 8-9 hrs. sleep, wake-up time 5AM.
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
My sleep is so good, unbelievable, as someone who chased sleep most of my life. I take 3x Mg malate 1300mg AM and PM. That is, 600mg elemental mg. This amount has been stable for at least a year. I've always awakened at dawn, I structure my day to give me 8-9 hrs. sleep, wake-up time 5AM.
Yes, I have been looking at my genetics trying to get my tinnitus and weird sleep patterns to change. What keeps coming up is adenosine (and glutamate) and the role magnesium plays it the pathway that creates adenosine.

Since Magneisum up-regulates COMT and depletes epinephrine I need to be careful taking it with the FMN which up regulates MAOA witch also metabolizes epinepherine. In the past I think it made it hard for me to get my blood sugar up, one of the roles of Epi.
 

Remy

Administrator
Since Magneisum up-regulates COMT and depletes epinephrine
This is what the science says about the most common COMT mutation...emphasis mine.

Variations in the COMT gene also may be associated with mental illness in people without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Researchers have looked extensively at the potential connection between changes in the COMT gene and the risk of developing schizophrenia.

Most studies have focused on the effects of a particular common variation (polymorphism) in catechol-O-methyltransferase. This variation alters a single protein building block (amino acid) in the enzyme, replacing the amino acid valine with the amino acid methionine. In the longer form of the enzyme, this variation occurs at position 158 (written as Val158Met). In the shorter form of the enzyme, it occurs at position 108 (written as Val108Met). Researchers often shorten this notation to Val108/158Met. The change affects the stability and activity of catechol-O-methyltransferase, which alters the enzyme's ability to break down neurotransmitters in the prefrontal cortex.

Studies of the Val108/158Met polymorphism in people with schizophrenia have had mixed results. While most studies report no evidence of heightened risk with either methionine or valine at this position, some studies have found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia in people with valine at position 108/158. Having valine at this position is associated with differences in thought processes that are common in people with schizophrenia, including problems with working memory, inhibition of behavior, and attention. Other changes in the COMT gene may also contribute to these differences. Variations in the COMT gene are among many factors under study to help explain the causes of schizophrenia. A large number of genetic and lifestyle factors, most of which remain unknown, likely determine the risk of developing this condition.
This study says that magnesium is a critical co-factor of COMT...but nowhere does it say anything about up-regulating it. Necessary is not the same thing as up-regulating.

Finally, epinephrine depletes magnesium but I see no evidence for the inverse statement. There may be some truth to magnesium inhibiting the secretion of epinephrine, but again, that's not exactly the same thing as depleting it.

So basically there's no evidence that I can find YET that COMT is an issue for anyone other than *possibly* those suffering from schizophrenia yet doctors all over the Internet are trying to sell you supplements to fix it.
 

RuthAnn

Well-Known Member
Oh boy! This is so exciting! I can't wait for Cort's interview. I wish I knew who he is going to interview.
I think I'll go watch those videos so I can learn more about it!
 

IrisRV

Well-Known Member
Do you know?
Sorry, I don't. I haven't dug deeply into genetics yet. I was thinking that since Croatoan first brought it up, he would be the one who could best explain it.
And look what I found! Did you know that they are looking at COMT with respect to Parkinson's?
Interesting! There's a tremendous amount of research that needs to be done on the impact genetics have on any number of illnesses. There's not much that's even close to definitive at the moment, but I believe that time will come and I'm looking forward to it. I expect it to be very exciting.
 

Get Our Free ME/CFS and FM Blog!



New Threads

Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Shopping on Amazon.com For HR

Latest Resources

Top