Resource Found My Fitness Genetic Report for Vitamins

Discussion in 'Testing and Diagnosis' started by Not dead yet!, Feb 27, 2019.

  1. Not dead yet!

    Not dead yet! Well-Known Member

    My journey has involved many "diagnosis of exclusion" events such as OA, Fibro, ME/CFS, and several kinds of headaches along with Migraine w/ Aura. Recently I discovered I had Celiac Disease too, so I've been dealing with that.

    I got a genetic test from 23andme over a year ago and I was disappointed that they didn't tell me much. But they did tell me I had HLA-DQ8, one of the two major risks for Celiac disease and it turned out I had undiagnosed Celiac disease contributing to my other problems. I haven't decided if it was totally Celiac or not. I don't think so, so far.

    This service from Found My Fitness analyzes your genetic test data (which you can download in full as a text file from a genetic testing service like 23andme or ancestry.com), and produces a report focused on how your body processes vitamins and minerals. I was blown away by how accurate and helpful this report is, so I'm posting an example and the link to the report here in hopes it helps someone else too.

    If you decide to do this, there is a list of checkboxes you have to agree to, and one of them is something like "you acknowledge that parts of this may be wrong" and indeed I did find something off right away. That doesn't overshadow the much higher proportion of things they got right, so I've taken a screenshot of what they got wrong for me, and one of the many they got right.

    Some of it is like, well yeah, I knew that (ie. omega3 type stuff), but I have to reflect that I've been fighting really hard for my health for a long time,and for many people some of it might be news.

    The report creation link is here, it costs $10: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/genetics

    Something I've noticed from reading my promethease report and this report, is that the SNPs don't necessarily mean that your epigenetics are actually using these genes right now. Many of them conflict with each other, for instance my husband's overall genes say "increased lifespan" but there are a few that say the opposite. His family does appear to be long lived on both sides.

    For my example, the vitamin D gene is telling me basically what I've discovered, that my body doesn't process D3 well, and if I take D2, I get a better circulating vitamin D level.

    The other gene that says vitamin E may be harmful for me, is I think, mistaken. First, it's based on a study of men, and my effect from 2k IU of Vitamin E is that it stops menstrual pain. I also have a high tendency to form clots and Vitamin E helps a lot with that.

    So you have to interpret and use all the available data, not just this report. But it's the most helpful one I've found yet.

    The woman who produced the genetic analysis report, Rhonda Patrick, is a protege of Dr. Bruce Ames, a somewhat famous research scientist who once owned the business Juvenon (then retired from it), and is in his 90s now, still publishing science about vitamins. He's worth looking up on youtube if you're interested in mitochondrial function. His life's work has been very focused on that, and Rhonda Patrick is one of his protege students.
     

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    madie and Remy like this.
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