Housebound versus nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome

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Housebound versus nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome

  1. Tricia Pendergrast1
  2. Abigail Brown1
  3. Madison Sunnquist1
  4. Rachel Jantke1
  5. Julia L Newton2
  6. Elin Bolle Strand3
  7. Leonard A Jason1
  1. mce-anchor
    1Center for Community Research, DePaul University, USA
  2. mce-anchor
    2Newcastle University, UK
  3. mce-anchor
    3Oslo University Hospital, Norway
  1. Tricia Pendergrast, Center for Community Research, DePaul University, 990 W. Fullerton Ave. Suite 3100, Chicago, IL 60605, USA. Email: tpender1@depaul.edu
Objectives The objective of this study was to examine individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome who are confined to their homes due to severe symptomatology. The existing literature fails to address differences between this group, and less severe, nonhousebound patient populations.
Methods Participants completed the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire, a measure of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome symptomology, and the SF-36, a measure of health impact on physical/mental functioning. ANOVAs and, where appropriate, MANCOVAS were used to compare housebound and nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome across areas of functioning, symptomatology, and illness onset characteristics.
Results Findings indicated that the housebound group represented one quarter of the sample, and were significantly more impaired with regards to physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning, fatigue, postexertional malaise, sleep, pain, neurocognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and immune functioning compared to individuals who were not housebound.
Discussion Findings indicated that housebound patients have more impairment on functional and symptom outcomes compared to those who were not housebound. Understanding the differences between housebound and not housebound groups holds implications for physicians and researchers as they develop interventions intended for patients who are most severely affected by this chronic illness.
  • Received December 16, 2015.
  • Accepted February 21, 2016.

http://chi.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/04/22/1742395316644770.abstract
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
The result is probably obvious but it can't hurt to shine light on just how severe things are for 25% of patients.
Yah, obvious to us but very good to validate that 25% of people with ME/CFS are actually housebound. That's a great stat that advocates of all sorts can use. I imagine we're going to see it showing up in media articles and elsewhere...

"Findings indicated that the housebound group represented one quarter of the sample, and were significantly more impaired with regards to physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning, fatigue, postexertional malaise, sleep, pain, neurocognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and immune functioning compared to individuals who were not housebound."

I wonder if there's another disease that comes close to it? I imagine that very few do...
 

GrammaLinda

Active Member
Housebound versus nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome

  1. Tricia Pendergrast1
  2. Abigail Brown1
  3. Madison Sunnquist1
  4. Rachel Jantke1
  5. Julia L Newton2
  6. Elin Bolle Strand3
  7. Leonard A Jason1
  8. mce-anchor
    1Center for Community Research, DePaul University, USA
  9. mce-anchor
    2Newcastle University, UK
  10. mce-anchor
    3Oslo University Hospital, Norway
  11. Tricia Pendergrast, Center for Community Research, DePaul University, 990 W. Fullerton Ave. Suite 3100, Chicago, IL 60605, USA. Email: tpender1@depaul.edu



http://chi.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/04/22/1742395316644770.abstract
I am housebound but lack the strength to complete a survey or participate. Good luck
 

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