Inducing Post-Exertional Malaise in ME/CFS: A Look at the Research Evidence - Webinar (2015)

JennyJenny

Well-Known Member
Webinar July 2015

SolveCFS - Webinar
Dr. Peter Rowe of the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, reviews the available published literature describing the various conditions that have been reported to induce post-exertional malaise. Chart starting at 16:35 is very good.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Webinar July 2015

SolveCFS - Webinar
Dr. Peter Rowe of the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, reviews the available published literature describing the various conditions that have been reported to induce post-exertional malaise. Chart starting at 16:35 is very good.
Thanks for piquing my interest! I will put it on my list!
 

San Diego

Well-Known Member
Since B1 adrenergic is the most highly expressed gene after exercise, perhaps upping my Atenolol dose after activity would help reduce some of the PEM? It’s worth a shot, as my dose is rather low in terms of “normal” dosing and even with an increase I’d still be well within safe limits.

Has this been tried?
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Since B1 adrenergic is the most highly expressed gene after exercise, perhaps upping my Atenolol dose after activity would help reduce some of the PEM? It’s worth a shot, as my dose is rather low in terms of “normal” dosing and even with an increase I’d still be well within safe limits.

Has this been tried?
I don't know. I know that the Light's have used propanolol to good effect in some patients. Is that similar to atenolol?
 

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