Long-term methylphenidate intake in chronic fatigue syndrome

h3ro

Active Member
Long-term methylphenidate intake in chronic fatigue syndrome

DOI: 10.1080/17843286.2016.1200816
Daniel Blockmans* & Philippe Persoons
Publishing models and article dates explained
Published online: 27 Jun 2016

Abstract
Objective: Concentration disturbances are frequent in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). In a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study, methylphenidate over 4 weeks was superior to placebo in the relief of fatigue and concentration disturbance. This observational study describes the effect of long-term methylphenidate intake on fatigue, concentration, and daily life activities, as reported by the patients themselves.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all CFS patients who were prescribed methylphenidate at the general internal medicine department of a university hospital between August 2004 and February 2007, for possible improvement of concentration difficulties and fatigue.

Results: Out of 194 consecutive patients, 149 (76.8%) sent the questionnaire back. At the time of the questionnaire, 65.3% had stopped the intake of methylphenidate, 34.7% still took it daily or occasionally. Among the patients who continued methylphenidate, 48% reported an at least 50% improvement of fatigue, and 62% reported an at least 50% improvement of concentration difficulties. This continued intake of methylphenidate resulted in more working hours in these patients. Side effects (agitation, palpitations, and dry mouth) were reported significantly more in patients who had stopped methylphenidate than in those who still took it.

Conclusion: The long-term intake of methylphenidate by CFS patients with concentration difficulties has a positive effect in about one out of three patients.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17843286.2016.1200816
 

h3ro

Active Member
I honestly can't see stimulants as being a good idea for anyone with significant mitochondrial dysfunction.
 

h3ro

Active Member
I find anything stimulating triggers crashes for me. Including supplements, foods and medications.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
That's a pretty big increase in fatigue and concentration: I'd like to try it and use it intermittently.

Among the patients who continued methylphenidate, 48% reported an at least 50% improvement of fatigue, and 62% reported an at least 50% improvement of concentration difficulties.

That's the drug used in the Synergy trial in combination with supplements to boost energy levels. It seemed to work but the high placebo effect in the trial messed up the findings.

http://www.healthrising.org/blog/2014/05/19/stimulating-energy-mitochondrial-enhancement-synergy-clinical-trial-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/
 

Snow Leopard

Active Member
Methylphenidate is heavily restricted in Australia - requires hospital authority from memory, and in turn requires an adult ADHD diagnosis. No off label prescription.

That's the drug used in the Synergy trial in combination with supplements to boost energy levels. It seemed to work but the high placebo effect in the trial messed up the findings.
High placebo effect LOL. That's why we have placebo controlled trials in the first place - to control for unexpected biases.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Methylphenidate is heavily restricted in Australia - requires hospital authority from memory, and in turn requires an adult ADHD diagnosis. No off label prescription.



High placebo effect LOL. That's why we have placebo controlled trials in the first place - to control for unexpected biases.
good point
 

Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Shopping on Amazon.com For HR

Latest Resources

Top