ME/CFS 2016 Webinars Announced!

Remy

Administrator
From the Solve ME/CFS website:

http://solvecfs.org/2016+Webinars+Announced

The Solve ME/CFS Initiative is kicking off its 2016 webinar series March 17 with a presentation by Sue Levine, MD, founder of the Medical Office of Susan M. Levine, MD. Dr. Levine will address: “The Future of ME/CFS.”

The free webinar will take place at 1 p.m. Eastern time. To register for Dr. Levine’s webinar, go here.
On April 21, our webinar will feature Avindra Nath, MD, Clinical Director at the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr. Nath is Principal Investigator of NIH’s new intramural study on ME/CFS.

On May 19, we’ll feature Jarred Younger, PhD, Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychology, Anesthesiology and Rheumatology in the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Younger established the Neuroinflammation, Pain and Fatigue Laboratory at UAB, where he oversees the development of new diagnostic tests and treatments for chronic pain and fatigue disorders.

On June 16, we’ll host Jose Montoya, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Montoya leads the Stanford Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Initiative.
Registration for the April, May and June webinars will be available soon. Webinars for the second half of the year will be announced in the coming months.

Check our website at SolveCFS.org/webinar or our Facebook page at facebook.com/SolveMECFSInitiative for registration notifications and links for future webinars.
 
E

EYAKLLE

Guest
N they keeeeeep on taaaalking n taaaalking.
Where's the real result?
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
From the Solve ME/CFS website:

http://solvecfs.org/2016+Webinars+Announced

The Solve ME/CFS Initiative is kicking off its 2016 webinar series March 17 with a presentation by Sue Levine, MD, founder of the Medical Office of Susan M. Levine, MD. Dr. Levine will address: “The Future of ME/CFS.”

The free webinar will take place at 1 p.m. Eastern time. To register for Dr. Levine’s webinar, go here.
On April 21, our webinar will feature Avindra Nath, MD, Clinical Director at the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr. Nath is Principal Investigator of NIH’s new intramural study on ME/CFS.

On May 19, we’ll feature Jarred Younger, PhD, Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychology, Anesthesiology and Rheumatology in the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Younger established the Neuroinflammation, Pain and Fatigue Laboratory at UAB, where he oversees the development of new diagnostic tests and treatments for chronic pain and fatigue disorders.

On June 16, we’ll host Jose Montoya, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Montoya leads the Stanford Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Initiative.

Registration for the April, May and June webinars will be available soon. Webinars for the second half of the year will be announced in the coming months.

Check our website at SolveCFS.org/webinar or our Facebook page at facebook.com/SolveMECFSInitiative for registration notifications and links for future webinars.
Dr. Nath is the man! I still feel like pinching myself. He is really interested apparently in ME/CFS.

Just to reiterate Nath is an expert on the effects of infections on the central nervous system. It could be a past pathogen or a present one. It's just extraordinary that he's gotten involved.

Avindra "Avi" Nath, MD, (born December 1, 1958), is a physician-scientist who specializes in neuroimmunology. Nath is the intramural clinical director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States.[1] At NINDS, Nath also leads the Section of Infections of the Nervous System and plans to institute a translational research center.[1] He previously served in several research and administrative positions at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
As a researcher, Nath investigates the molecular mechanisms whereby human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes neurological disorders including HIV dementia. Nath has published more than 200 scientific articles, reviews, and book chapters, and is on the editorial board of several journals. He has been an expert advisor to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).[2][3][4]
I worry about Dr. Montoya's research efforts. He's spent $5,000,000 or so dollars or something like that over the past five years and has published, I think, one study :nailbiting:

Good for them for getting Younger in there as well...and Levine..
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
N they keeeeeep on taaaalking n taaaalking.
Where's the real result?
We are getting some good results - just not enough to move the needle so that patients notice.....We'll see what happens in May with the NIH and their strategic plan...That is vital...
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Some more good news on the NIH front: Koroshetz is also the Keynote speaker for the IACFS/ME Conference in October

Featuring Keynote speaker: Walter Koroshetz, MD
Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
 

Hello!

Well-Known Member
I worry about Dr. Montoya's research efforts. He's spent $5,000,000 or so dollars or something like that over the past five years and has published, I think, one study :nailbiting:.
I keep wondering about that, too.
 

Ron

Member
Looking over the Stanford Spring Newsletter they look like a number of interesting papers should come out this year. I also know they have a Cytokine paper due any time.
http://med.stanford.edu/content/dam/sm/chronicfatigue/documents/MECFSNewsletter_Spring_2015.pdf

High Throughput Sequencing/Pathogen Discovery: Through our continued partnership with Holden Maecker
PhD at Stanford and W. Ian Lipkin MD and Mady Hornig MA, MD at Columbia University, our effort of
looking for pathogens present or abundant in ME/CFS patients has yielded exciting results. We are in the
process of preparing a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.


Gene Expression and Immune System Dynamics-Gene Expression: In order to understand the immune
response and possible immune dysfunction observed in our ME/CFS patients, we are collaborating closely with
Mark Davis PhD at Human Immune Monitoring Core facility at Stanford, and with Holden Maecker PhD. We
are in the process of finalizing analysis of samples and plan on submitting a manuscript shortly.


Cardiovascular Health in ME/CFS patients: Our study in collaboration with Francois Haddad MD and Mehdi
Skhiri MD of evaluating cardiovascular aging in ME/CFS patients has concluded with the recruitment and
analysis of samples. Even though their work revealed that the heart is highly unlikely to be affected by
ME/CFS, Drs. Haddad and Skhiri are now looking at endothelial function and cytokine levels before and after
physical exercise. The manuscripts are currently in preparation for publication.

Cognitive Impairment Study in ME/CFS patients: Marcie Zinn PhD, Mark Zinn MM, and José R. Maldonado
MD at Stanford University led a study utilizing electroencephalography (EEG) to yield objective measurements
for evaluating cognitive impairments in ME/CFS patients. The manuscript is currently in review for
publication.

Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling: This is an ongoing
Department of Defense (DoD) grant, which aims to explore the immune responses of ME/CFS patients and how
they differ to healthy controls. We are also analyzing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) types in ME/CFS
patients, responsible for the regulation of the immune system. We are currently finalizing analysis and will
start preparing manuscript shortly.
 

IrisRV

Well-Known Member
I worry about Dr. Montoya's research efforts. He's spent $5,000,000 or so dollars or something like that over the past five years and has published, I think, one study :nailbiting:
In my experience, that's about how long it takes to get research from funded to published. I would expect a number of papers very soon.

ETA: @Ron beat me to it. :) It looks like there are at least 5 papers soon to be published. :D [We need a thumbs up emoti]
 
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Hello!

Well-Known Member
In my experience, that's about how long it takes to get research from funded to published. I would expect a number of papers very soon.

ETA: @Ron beat me to it. :) It looks like there are at least 5 papers soon to be published. :D [We need a thumbs up emoti]
I hope you're right. That newsletter was published 9 months ago.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I hope so....I'm worried about Montoya...He's lost Younger and the Zinn's. I asked the Zinn's about the paper of theirs Montoya said was in review

Cognitive Impairment Study in ME/CFS patients: Marcie Zinn PhD, Mark Zinn MM, and José R. Maldonado
MD at Stanford University led a study utilizing electroencephalography (EEG) to yield objective measurements
for evaluating cognitive impairments in ME/CFS patients. The manuscript is currently in review for
publication.


They said they had no idea what he was talking about - that they hadn't talked to him in about a year and were now working with Lenny Jason. They just published a QEEG paper with him...
 

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