measure brain inflammation with PET and 11C-PK11195

loki

Well-Known Member
hi,
well, my theory is that a brain inflammation process drives the symptoms of a number of CFS/ME cases. This should be measureable: A TSPO radiotracer like 11C-PK11195 is administered before a PET scan is performed. The resulting image should show active microglia that drive the neuroinflammation.
I live in a city with PET scanners and a cyclotron (since the 11C tracers have very short half lifes and have to be synthesized on site ><) and will try to get such a test done. Anyone else here that lives next to a cyclotron?
jeeeez....:confused:
 
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Onslow

Active Member
Well neuroinflammation has already been shown to be present in CFS:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24665088

It's also a feature of chronic stress, and depression:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282861280_Effect_of_chronic_social_defeat_on_neuroinflammation_in_rats_a_PET_imaging_study_with_11CPK11195

My guess is that the neuroinflammation is just another symptom, and not the cause.

The other question is: are these studies actually picking up "neuroinflammation"? 11C-PK11195 has a number of different binding sites, and isn't simply a marker of inflammation:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17457364

It actually binds to the benzodiazapene receptor, which is also involved in stress regulation and anxiety.
 

loki

Well-Known Member
PK11195 is the most used tracer for the TSPO that is expressed in active microglia, cells in the CNS that drive the neurodegenerative process in MS, PD, AD and other CNS disorders.
 

loki

Well-Known Member
AD:
[bimg=fleft|no-lightbox]http://qims.amegroups.com/article/viewFile/6214/7045/36185[/bimg]
 

Onslow

Active Member
PK11195 is the most used tracer for the TSPO that is expressed in active microglia, cells in the CNS that drive the neurodegenerative process in MS, PD, AD and other CNS disorders.
Yes, but it's also a marker for other things, such as the effects of chronic stress.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Well neuroinflammation has already been shown to be present in CFS:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24665088

It's also a feature of chronic stress, and depression:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282861280_Effect_of_chronic_social_defeat_on_neuroinflammation_in_rats_a_PET_imaging_study_with_11CPK11195

My guess is that the neuroinflammation is just another symptom, and not the cause.

The other question is: are these studies actually picking up "neuroinflammation"? 11C-PK11195 has a number of different binding sites, and isn't simply a marker of inflammation:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17457364

It actually binds to the benzodiazapene receptor, which is also involved in stress regulation and anxiety.
Either way it works for me; I have fatigue, post-exertional malaise, poor stress regulation and the weirdest case of hyperarousal/anxiety ever.
 

Onslow

Active Member
What did the Japanese ME/CFS study use - does anyone know?
They used 11C-PK11195 as well (see the first link in my post), which is the same marker as for the studies on chronic psychosocial stress, MS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and others showing neuroinflammation (or whatever it is that this marker is picking up).
 

loki

Well-Known Member
They used 11C-PK11195 as well (see the first link in my post), which is the same marker as for the studies on chronic psychosocial stress, MS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and others showing neuroinflammation (or whatever it is that this marker is picking up).
hmm interesting that they used the method to measure it in CFS/ME... there's a better marker (with a better signal-to-noise ratio) 18Fluor-GE180 that doesn't require the on-site production with a cyclotron because it has a longer half-life. but it's in clinical trials at the moment so unavailable... my internet is very slow so i didn't looked up the link, i try it again
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Hasn't this marker been upgraded? I thought there was some improvement in it.

I think this is one reason Jarred Younger is trying to measure brain temperature...I guess if you determine there is inflammation then you try to create anti-inflammatories that reach the brain?
 

loki

Well-Known Member
Hasn't this marker been upgraded? I thought there was some improvement in it.

I think this is one reason Jarred Younger is trying to measure brain temperature...I guess if you determine there is inflammation then you try to create anti-inflammatories that reach the brain?
Yeah, right. The inflammation itself is the pharmacological target, in most (or all?) cases active microglia and reactive astrocytes drive the degenerative process, so the target in this case would be the microglia or the inflammatory substances they produce.
A glucose radiotracer could show abnormalities in CNS metabolism but i guess that the 11C-benzo tracer will show anything too.
 

loki

Well-Known Member
-.- they stopped the dexedrin 2 days ago and i'mconstantly falling asleep it makes me crazy :(
 

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