Meet Willow, dysautonomia service dog in-training!

Remy

Administrator
I'm officially dog-mad!

I adopted Willow 2 weeks ago as a potential service dog to help me with dysautonomia and POTS issues.

I'm lucky to have a local organization that is familiar with these types of issues and has trained dogs for these tasks in the past. We passed our initial evaluation with flying colors and will begin the training program in Sept 2017.

For now, we just work on "sit" and "stay" and enjoy being a puppy!

https://patientworthy.com/2016/03/24/medical-alert-service-dogs-dysautonomia/
fullsizeoutput_b36.jpeg
 

Remy

Administrator
How is she coming along as a dysautonomia service dog? How long does the training take?
She's doing well but we are just working on the basic training right now.

There are three modules. This first one ends next month before Thanksgiving and then we have a break into Feb for the holidays. Then we have another break for the summer and the third module will finish up Thanksgiving 2018.

That all is predicated on us, ahem, passing the tests! We are in no way ready to pass the one in 3 weeks, but they say we have up til the second module starts to pass it.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Ohhhhh, I want one!!!! Would be great to have a friend to detect when an issue is about to present.

My husband can detect when I'm about to have a mast cell issue before I can. He says my skin gets hot and clammy. Usually my first sign is naseau and a headache. But he will say - you're about to have one and sure enough - there comes the headache.

I'm certain a dog could detect our issues before us. My dog, I used to have - would come and put her head in my lap and stay touching me when I was so bad. She wasn't trained to do that. But was very perceptive. We just need a hug sometimes. And unconditional love is a plus too.

How do you learn how to train them for dyasautonomia and other issues? Is there a guidebook?

Issie
 

Farmgirl

Well-Known Member
I'm officially dog-mad!

I adopted Willow 2 weeks ago as a potential service dog to help me with dysautonomia and POTS issues.

I'm lucky to have a local organization that is familiar with these types of issues and has trained dogs for these tasks in the past. We passed our initial evaluation with flying colors and will begin the training program in Sept 2017.

For now, we just work on "sit" and "stay" and enjoy being a puppy!

https://patientworthy.com/2016/03/24/medical-alert-service-dogs-dysautonomia/View attachment 2576
@Remy....I am SO happy for you!!!! Willow should be great for you. Happy!!!
 

Remy

Administrator
How do you learn how to train them for dyasautonomia and other issues? Is there a guidebook?
We are working with this group...http://www.medicalmutts.com

The first module is about passing the Canine Good Citizen test, basic training mostly. So you could look that up for the criteria needed to pass. Once we get into the more advanced modules, I can share some of the training sheets.

For reactions, I am supposed to swab with cotton my face and neck and breathe into the plastic baggie. Then we train with it using a can. But we are just on the first step now.
 

Farmgirl

Well-Known Member
Ohhhhh, I want one!!!! Would be great to have a friend to detect when an issue is about to present.

My husband can detect when I'm about to have a mast cell issue before I can. He says my skin gets hot and clammy. Usually my first sign is naseau and a headache. But he will say - you're about to have one and sure enough - there comes the headache.

I'm certain a dog could detect our issues before us. My dog, I used to have - would come and put her head in my lap and stay touching me when I was so bad. She wasn't trained to do that. But was very perceptive. We just need a hug sometimes. And unconditional love is a plus too.

How do you learn how to train them for dyasautonomia and other issues? Is there a guidebook?

Issie
I am sure I NEED one, too....it can possibly help with my hot flashes?!?. I have enough of them. ;-):wacky:

Okay, maybe not. I have a nice dog right now anyways, but Willow is SO adorable!
 

Farmgirl

Well-Known Member
We are working with this group...http://www.medicalmutts.com

The first module is about passing the Canine Good Citizen test, basic training mostly. So you could look that up for the criteria needed to pass. Once we get into the more advanced modules, I can share some of the training sheets.

For reactions, I am supposed to swab with cotton my face and neck and breathe into the plastic baggie. Then we train with it using a can. But we are just on the first step now.
We are working with this group...http://www.medicalmutts.com

The first module is about passing the Canine Good Citizen test, basic training mostly. So you could look that up for the criteria needed to pass. Once we get into the more advanced modules, I can share some of the training sheets.

For reactions, I am supposed to swab with cotton my face and neck and breathe into the plastic baggie. Then we train with it using a can. But we are just on the first step now.
Do you pass out all the way? That must be scary. I just feel like I am going to pass out and don't when I lie down.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
I usually have enough symptoms to sit down too. I've only fainted 3 times. But now, mast cell issues - a whole other story. Too bad we couldn't train them to tell us what not to do to trigger an event. Now that would be a valuable dog!!!!!

Did you get your own dog or one of theirs? I want another Aussie. Would love a minature one.

Issie
 

Remy

Administrator
Did you get your own dog or one of theirs? I want another Aussie. Would love a minature one.
I got my own...that was part of the draw to them because I knew I wanted (another) Golden. Aussies are super smart too!
 

Vaporization

Active Member
@Remy I'm a dogman. :D

I started with a Weimareiner and studied a book by a USMC trainer who dealt with problem dogs. My Weimar taught me, he was brilliant. He amazed people with his obedience, few have seen a highly trained dog.

When he died I adopted two abused dogs, first an English Short-Haired Pointer, then another Weimar.

The Weimaraner was in danger of being put down. My English Short-Haired Pointer and I saved his life, mostly her. He was damaged enough that he tried to bite me in the first few days. I grabbed his lower jaw and placed him on the ground. I got eye to eye with him and told him that he will never do that again because I love you and you will survive this.

That was the end of his biting problem, and my Short-Haired Pointer became somewhat of a big sister for him. She was the Alpha, and though he never had the confidence of my other Weimar that wasn't abused, he enjoyed every day of the rest of his life and not only avoided biting anyone again, he was passionately protective of my Wife.

All of my dogs could have qualified for CD, they were so well behaved and prepared me for being a parent. Although, I haven't had to do the Jaw thing with my children. :hilarious:

I am confident you will succeed with your training, many people seriously underestimate what a dog can do. ;)
 
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Remy

Administrator
@Remy I'm a dogman. :D

I started with a Weimareiner and studied a book by a USMC trainer who dealt with problem dogs. My Weimar taught me, he was brilliant. He amazed people with his obedience, few have seen a highly trained dog.

When he died I adopted two abused dogs, first an English Short-Haired Pointer, then another Weimar.

The Weimaraner was in danger of being put down. My English Short-Haired Pointer and I saved his life, mostly her. He was damaged enough that he tried to bite me in the first few days. I grabbed his lower jaw and placed him on the ground. I got eye to eye with him and told him that he will never do that again because I love you and you will survive this.

That was the end of his biting problem, and my Short-Haired Pointer became somewhat of a big sister for him. She was the Alpha, and though he never had the confidence of my other Weimar that wasn't abused, he enjoyed every day of the rest of his life and not only avoided biting anyone again, he was passionately protective of my Wife.

All of my dogs could have qualified for CD, they were so well behaved and prepared me for being a parent. Although, I haven't had to do the Jaw thing with my children. :hilarious:

I am confident you will succeed with your training, many people seriously underestimate what a dog can do. ;)
Thank you for sharing your story! And for the vote of confidence...I feel lucky every day to have such great canine friends.
 

Vaporization

Active Member
@Remy I have to live vicariously through others, dog ownership in Japan is quite costly. So I do hope you keep us all informed of your progress with Willow.
 

Vaporization

Active Member
Hi Remy, I researched http://www.medicalmutts.com/ and I must confess, I am most curious about the progress of Willow's training.

So I'll share another story about the training of my mutts. :D

I was curious about "scent training", so I showed my Weimar a dog biscuit. Made him sniff it, but you can't eat it! Then I closed the front door to my house, with him inside. I dragged the biscuit through the dew-wet grass at night. Halfway through the yard I made a 90-degree turn, and then another, before laying the biscuit in the grass.

He caught the trail immediately upon release, and was going so fast he overran my abrupt turn. He was so excited, he promptly reacquired the trail and wasn't fooled so easily by the second turn.

It took him about 15 seconds to find that dog biscuit, in the dark. ;)
 

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