N-acetylcysteine (NAC) Improves Dopamine Function.

Remy

Administrator
N-acetylcysteine is a good supplement for most of us to try...and here is some new research that suggests it may improve glutathione and dopamine levels (in Parkinson's patients).

The dosages used orally (600 mg twice a day) are readily and cheaply available just about anywhere which is also a nice change.

The natural molecule, n-acetylcysteine (NAC), with strong antioxidant effects, shows potential benefit as part of the management for patients with Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Combining clinical evaluations of a patient's mental and physical abilities with brain imaging studies that tracked the levels of dopamine, the lack of which is thought to cause Parkinson's, doctors from the Departments of Integrative Medicine, Neurology, and Radiology, at Thomas Jefferson University showed that patients receiving NAC improved on both measures.
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
I took that dose of NAC for quite awhile with no problems. Then for whatever reason I stopped

When I went to take it again I couldn't tolerate it. I tried 2 days then gave up but it's sitting next to my bed.

I never noticed much from it. It was part of the "stop" inflammation protocol.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
N-acetylcysteine is a good supplement for most of us to try...and here is some new research that suggests it may improve glutathione and dopamine levels (in Parkinson's patients).

The dosages used orally (600 mg twice a day) are readily and cheaply available just about anywhere which is also a nice change.
If it works in Parkinson's patients I'll definitely give it a try....Its been awhile since I've tried NAC...
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I took that dose of NAC for quite awhile with no problems. Then for whatever reason I stopped

When I went to take it again I couldn't tolerate it. I tried 2 days then gave up but it's sitting next to my bed.

I never noticed much from it. It was part of the "stop" inflammation protocol.
It's weird how shifts like that occur....
 

Yavapai

Member
Taking NAC to increase glutathione is only seeing part of the issue. NAC needs several enzymes to turn into glutathione, and those enzymes need sufficient vitamin cofactors to function.

I feel the reason NAC stops working is that when you take it you deplete those vitamin cofcators OR you increase glutathione activity too much.

NAC will also turn into Taurine and Sulfate.
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
Please show documentation to backup what you just said about NAC. We don't want any inaccuracies.
 

Yavapai

Member
Theres a feeling that nac depletes vitamins and cofactors.
Keep with that feeling.

We need vitamin cofactors to process the fats, carbs, and proteins we eat. Eating cysteine is no different, it is an amino acid that has to be processed.
 
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