Oxaloacetate reduces glutamate, helps mitochondria and improves glucose control

Remy

Administrator
Oxaloacetate (OA) is a supplement that is created from a natural metabolite of the Krebs cycle. It works by improving the NAD/NADH ratio and by increasing AMPK. This improves the metabolism in general by lowering and stabilizing blood sugar.

At higher doses, OA will reduce glutamate levels in the brain and improve brain function as well.

It also has benefits to the mitochondria. Not only does OA increase the number of mitochondria, it also feeds them and helps them to produce ATP.

There have been a few animal studies done but no human studies as of yet since it is not a patentable product. However, some people are using it in very high doses to treat things like brain cancer that have very low survival rates otherwise.

The downside is again the cost given the doses needed to be effective and the fact that it needs to be taken continuously. Some benefit would be seen at as little as 100 mg/day but I think for the corrective metabolic action we would want to see in MECFS, a larger dose would be required. I have no idea what that dose might be though I sure do wish someone would study it!

Here's a podcast with the developer of BenaGene:

 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
So
Oxaloacetate (OA) is a supplement that is created from a natural metabolite of the Krebs cycle. It works by improving the NAD/NADH ratio and by increasing AMPK. This improves the metabolism in general by lowering and stabilizing blood sugar.

At higher doses, OA will reduce glutamate levels in the brain and improve brain function as well.

It also has benefits to the mitochondria. Not only does OA increase the number of mitochondria, it also feeds them and helps them to produce ATP.

There have been a few animal studies done but no human studies as of yet since it is not a patentable product. However, some people are using it in very high doses to treat things like brain cancer that have very low survival rates otherwise.

The downside is again the cost given the doses needed to be effective and the fact that it needs to be taken continuously. Some benefit would be seen at as little as 100 mg/day but I think for the corrective metabolic action we would want to see in MECFS, a larger dose would be required. I have no idea what that dose might be though I sure do wish someone would study it!

Here's a podcast with the developer of BenaGene:

so many different avenues to improving the mitochondria. Given how complex they are I imagine that more will be discovered. Anything that reduces glutamate, improves mitochondrial and brain functioning certainly would be a winner.
 

Upgrayedd

Active Member
At higher doses, OA will reduce glutamate levels in the brain and improve brain function as well.
Coincidentally, I just ordered OA in BulletProof's Aging Formula. I had thought about it before, but it was expensive. I bought it now because it was 10% off and I found another 10% coupon. It's primary ingredient is OA.

I did not realize OA's effect on Glutamate, which I do believe is a trigger for at least some of my symptoms. I take Lamictal, which lowers Glutamate. I've also always felt better on low doses of Klonopin or other benzos, which increase GABA, which also inhibit Glutamate.

Can't wait to see if this helps... Thanks for the info.
 

Upgrayedd

Active Member
I just googled some prices, holy crap!
Yeah, not cheap. I'm still waiting for mine to come in the mail. As @Who Me? says, I should be cured shortly.

Why low carb diets arent working as well for us as other non cfsme people??
I wish I knew! I think I do much better overall on a very low carb diet, but I do feel like I haven't seen the 'miraculous' recoveries reported from the non cfs/me world on low carb.
 
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