'Progesterone therapy increases free thyroxine levels'

Remy

Administrator
300 mg *oral* progesterone nightly during luteal phase of cycle...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23252963

These are the first randomized controlled trial data to show that treatment with luteal phase equivalent doses of oral micronized progesterone is associated with a significant increase in Free T4 values.

This 12-week randomized controlled progesterone trial documented that Free T4 levels were significantly elevated in progesterone-treated compared with placebo-treated women. There also was a trend, as previously documented,[15, 16]towards lower TSH levels although there was no TSH-Free T4 interaction.

The absolute increase in Free T4 on progesterone therapy (+2.5 pmol/l; 95% CI: 1.9–3.0) is greater than the longitudinal 13-year, population-based normal within-person change of 0.04 pmol/l (95% CI: −0.16, 0.24).[24]

Likewise, although small, the adjusted mean difference in the Free T4 increase between progesterone and placebo of 0.8 pmol/l is also greater than that within-person 0.04 pmol/l longitudinal change.[25]

Given that the coefficient of variation in the FreeT4 assay is three per cent and the mean Free T4 level is 13.7 pmol/l, the observed adjusted change is double the potential maximal analytical variability of 0.41 pmol/l. These data, therefore, suggest that the increase in Free T4 during oral micronized progesterone therapy compared with placebo therapy is neither likely to be due to endogenous variance nor is it likely related to lack of analytical precision.

The observation that there is a nonsignificant trend towards lower TSH values during progesterone therapy is consistent with results from a smaller and shorter controlled trial in which TSH was a significant 24% lower during progesterone than during placebo treatment.[17] In that study, Free T4 did not change and Free T3 was not reported.[17] It is also consistent with data showing a trend towards lower night-time TSH values during the luteal phase.[15]

This trial is also the first to quantitatively examine a potential relationship between thyroid function and hot flushes and night sweats—no important relationships were observed. In a prospective observational Norwegian study, however, in 57 initially regularly menstruating women aged 51, as women became postmenopausal, higher TSH levels were noted in those with VMS compared with those without.[26]

Our VMS–thyroid analysis ideally should have included women with minimal or no vasomotor symptoms. As ours was a treatment trial, women were required to have treatment-requiring, troublesome VMS (at least five mild, or fewer more intense, daytime hot flushes or at least one night sweat per week of sufficient intensity to awaken them).[19] Further study of potential thyroid–VMS interactions is needed.

The strengths of this study are its prospective, randomized placebo-controlled design, and that blinding was maintained throughout thyroid hormone analysis. This trial also examined all three major hormones of the thyroid axis: TSH, Free T4 and Free T3. These data are limited, however, as a post hoc analysis of sera from a trial designed and registered for other purposes. It is puzzling that placebo as well as progesterone caused an increase in Free T4. This increase was smaller than that shown on progesterone, so that analysis of covariance documented a significantly greater Free T4 increase on progesterone therapy. Although it is regrettable that sera from more women in the primary trial were unavailable for thyroid hormone analysis, this should not bias results.

That we did not measure TBG may also be perceived as detrimental, however, the literature suggested no relationship to us; also, albumen levels did not change on progesterone therapy in the cardiovascular outcome analysis from the same trial (J.C. Prior; unpub. data). It would also perhaps have been ideal to assess deiodinase enzyme activity,[27] but these analyses were not available to us.

Whether or not the observed relationship between progesterone therapy and increased Free T4 levels has physiological importance is currently unknown. It is possible that progesterone plays a role in preventing inappropriately low Free T4 levels during pregnancy.[8] It is also possible that Free T4 mediates the progesterone-associated higher basal temperature[12] and the increased luteal phase energy requirements.[28]

Cigarette use and body mass index were associated with thyroid function in a recent large cohort study.[25] Given that the women participating in this trial were carefully screened to be nonsmokers without diabetes or hypertension and to have normal cardiovascular function, this study needs to be repeated in an unselected community cohort of postmenopausal women.

Finally, a larger randomized controlled trial of progesterone vs placebo in postmenopausal women without VMS or sleep disturbances is needed to confirm the increase in Free T4 shown here.

In summary, these data from a blinded and randomized controlled 12-week progesterone treatment trial in healthy postmenopausal women with hot flushes and night sweats document for the first time that progesterone therapy appears to cause an increase in Free T4. The clinical importance of this observation remains to be determined.
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
Oral progesterone, Prometrium, can cause constipation, or in my case it felt like it was twisting my intestine into knots.
 

Edie

Active Member
300 mg *oral* progesterone nightly during luteal phase of cycle...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23252963
Natural progesterone has worked well for me for increased energy and wellbeing. The one I use is by LIFE FLO, called PROGESTA-CARE. Many Health Food stores carry it, but I order it online from www.totalhealthdiscountvitamins.com in the US. at big savings. I also have thyroid problems, but my problem is that my body is not converting T4 to T3. I haven't noticed that progesterone has helped at all for my particular problem.
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
Progesta care has phenoxythenol in it. It's a bit so good preservative. If you are sensitive or prefer not to use chemicals there are other OTC progesterones that don't have bad stuff in them. Natural radiance and metabolic maintenance progesterones don't have chemicals or fragrance


Other HIGH concerns: Irritation (skin, eyes, or lungs), Occupational hazards; Other MODERATE concerns:Organ system toxicity (non-reproductive); Other LOW concerns: Data gaps
About PHENOXYETHANOL: Phenoxyethanol is a preservative used in cosmetics and personal care products.

Function(s): Fragrance Ingredient; Preservative

Synonym(s): 2-HYDROXYETHYL PHENYL ETHER; 2-PHENOXY- ETHANOL; 2-PHENOXYETHANOL; 2-PHENOXYETHYL ALCOHOL; ETHANOL, 2-PHENOXY-; ETHANOL, 2PHENOXY; ETHYLENE GLYCOL MONOPHENYL ETHER; PHENOXYTOL; 1-HYDROXY-2-PHENOXYETHANE; 2-FENOXYETHANOL (CZECH) ; 2-PHENOXYETHANOL

https://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/704811/PHENOXYETHANOL/
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
. I think if you can tolerate oral P, it's definitely the way to go.
Wish I could. I do wonder if compounded oral progesterone would be less of a problem than Prometrium. On my very long list of things to do.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I know someone who did very well on progesterone. She had to go to some length to find a doctor to prescribe. When she did it worked VERY well...the other hormones did not.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Progesterone does the opposite of what's is supposed to do with me. It hypes my sympathetic system and gives me Hot flashes.

Issie
 

Remy

Administrator
Progesterone does the opposite of what's is supposed to do with me. It hypes my sympathetic system and gives me Hot flashes.

Issie
Progesterone sensitizes estrogen receptors so it's not uncommon to get those symptoms, especially at first. Raising the dose often takes care of the problem in the first couple of months. I had to go up to 300 mg (a standard oral dose is 200-300 mg).
 

Issie

Well-Known Member

Remy

Administrator
I think with me, it activates mast cells. The only estrogen I can use is estriol as its a weaker estrogen.

http://mastocytosisaustralasia.com/resources/role-of-female-sex-hormones-in-mast-cell-behavior/

Issie
Progesterone likely inhibits mast cells though...another reason that I was interested in trying it at a higher dose.

Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2006 Oct-Dec;19(4):787-94.
Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

Vasiadi M1, Kempuraj D, Boucher W, Kalogeromitros D, Theoharides TC.

Abstract

Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
I was estrogen dominant and had endometriosis. We tried stopping my period for a year. Giving me progesterone. Etc.. end result hysterectomy. I wasn't to go on hormones for 6 months after. I only made it 5. Then we had a horrible time trying to find something I could use. I didn't tolerate progesterone at all. The only estrogen I could use was compounded estriol. I didn't have all my other DX back then. There is a form of anaphylaxis caused by autoimmune issues to your own hormones. Progesterone is one know to cause issues. Here is a quick chart on it.
https://ainotes.wikispaces.com/Progesterone+Hypersensitivity+and+Catamenial+Anaphylaxis

Issie
 
Last edited:

Remy

Administrator
I was estrogen dominant and had endometriosis. We tried stopping my period for a year. Giving me progesterone. Etc.. end result hysterectomy. I wasn't to go on hormones for 6 months after. I only made it 5. Then we had a horrible time trying to find something I could use. I didn't tolerate progesterone at all. The only estrogen I could use was compounded estriol. I didn't have all my other DX back then. There is a form of anaphylaxis caused by autoimmune issues to your own hormones. Progesterone is one know to cause issues. Here is a quick chart on it.
https://ainotes.wikispaces.com/Progesterone+Hypersensitivity+and+Catamenial+Anaphylaxis

Issie
I think it's vastly more likely to be prostaglandin sensitivity rather than progesterone as they also theorize. But who knows? I don't tend to put much weight behind the hormone allergy theory proposed by Roby et al.

I didn't tolerate progesterone either at low doses. It's counterintuitive to think that taking more of something that made you feel bad is going to work but it's often true with hormones in my experience. Cortisol is another one that seems to work that way.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Unless something changes, I don't want to trial that again. I'm okay with Red Clover and transdermal estriol gel. Seldom need either - as far as hormones go. Seem leveled out pretty well.

Other ways to supress mast cell degranulation. With my history that's not an area I want to play around with.

But, I hope it works for you.

By the way guys, progesterone is something you have too. When my dad had horrible flashes from prostate cancer and testosterone supression, they tried progesterone on him to see if it would help his flashes and sweats. It didnt, he seemed to have the same response I did. I often wonder if I hadn't had a hysterectomy so young (36)- would I have wound up like my dad with cancer. We have so many rare family inherited things.

Issie
 

Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Shopping on Amazon.com For HR

Latest Resources

Top