Scoliosis - Not Always an Incidental Finding?

Merida

Well-Known Member
Scoliosis and CFS/FM "run together" in my family. The prevalence rate for scoliosis in US adults is about 8%. Many people in my support group reported scoliosis, with one leg ( usually left) shorter, and sacral/pelvic pain.

This observation is supported in The Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Clinical Case Definition for Practitioners, edited by I. Jon Russell, MD,PhD. " FMS patients frequently have a short leg caused by assimilation ( upslip) on one side of the pelvis . . . and incompetence of the sacroiliac ligaments." " There is often a compensatory scoliosis of the lumbar spine . . .and scoliosis of the thoracic spine . . . " ( pp. 18-19)
Most cases of scoliosis ( about 80-90%)have been been labeled 'idiopathic,' meaning no one knows what causes the condition. Finally, there is book by orthopedic surgeon/scoliosis researcher, Professor Dr. Valentyne Serdyuk , that provides a theory based on over 8,000 clinical cases, on how scoliosis begins and how it can result in multiple pain, fatigue, and neurological symptoms.
Briefly, all humans are asymmetrical to some degree. This is a caused by the asymmetrical functioning of the cerebral hemispheres, particularly the anterior central gyrus, which controls body movements. Increased and 'unbalanced' functional activity of this brain area in the left or right hemisphere causes hyper contraction of one side of the extensor spinal muscles, which connect the top of the pelvis and lower spine.

Pelvic tilt results, as well as some lateral curvature of the spinal column. The body can only compensate to a certain degree. A large pelvic tilt ( no mention of exact degree in book) can then start the process of rotated vertebrae, and in more severe cases, deformed vertebrae.
There are many congenital variations in the vertebral structures ( such as cervical ribs, extra vertebrae, cleft vertebrae, etc) and certain variants many contribute to scoliotic out comes. It is said that the structure of the lumbosacral area is as individual as our faces.
Rotational and structural deformation of vertebrae can directly affect spinal nerve roots to organs and muscles, then cause pain and organ dysfunction. There are many examples given in the book. However, one of the most important 'take aways' may be the description of vertebral artery syndrome.
The vertebral arteries thread through little holes on the sides of the vertebrae in the neck. Rotation of the neck vertebrae ( from scoliosis ) can result in significant reduction of blood flow to important brain areas. Plus, there are individual variations in the actually boney structure of these holes. Neurological consequences include : dizziness, headaches, weakness, fatigue, vision problems ( like flashing lights in both eyes and blurry vision/more), periodic breathlessness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, numbness or tingling in hands/feet, slurred speech, drop attacks, and more.
It is important to appreciate that Doppler ultrasound may not be sufficient to diagnose vertebral artery syndrome, as the ultrasound can not imagine well through the boney vertebrae. The best test is an MR angiogram.

The name of the book : Scoliosis and Spinal Pain Syndrome : New Understanding of Their Origin and Ways of Successful Treatment by Professor Dr. Valentyn Serdyuk ( 2014)
Who has been diagnosed with scoliosis ? Has anyone been evaluated for vertebral artery syndrome ?
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Scoliosis and CFS/FM "run together" in my family. The prevalence rate for scoliosis in US adults is about 8%. Many people in my support group reported scoliosis, with one leg ( usually left) shorter, and sacral/pelvic pain.

This observation is supported in The Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Clinical Case Definition for Practitioners, edited by I. Jon Russell, MD,PhD. " FMS patients frequently have a short leg caused by assimilation ( upslip) on one side of the pelvis . . . and incompetence of the sacroiliac ligaments." " There is often a compensatory scoliosis of the lumbar spine . . .and scoliosis of the thoracic spine . . . " ( pp. 18-19)
Most cases of scoliosis ( about 80-90%)have been been labeled 'idiopathic,' meaning no one knows what causes the condition. Finally, there is book by orthopedic surgeon/scoliosis researcher, Professor Dr. Valentyne Serdyuk , that provides a theory based on over 8,000 clinical cases, on how scoliosis begins and how it can result in multiple pain, fatigue, and neurological symptoms.
Briefly, all humans are asymmetrical to some degree. This is a caused by the asymmetrical functioning of the cerebral hemispheres, particularly the anterior central gyrus, which controls body movements. Increased and 'unbalanced' functional activity of this brain area in the left or right hemisphere causes hyper contraction of one side of the extensor spinal muscles, which connect the top of the pelvis and lower spine.

Pelvic tilt results, as well as some lateral curvature of the spinal column. The body can only compensate to a certain degree. A large pelvic tilt ( no mention of exact degree in book) can then start the process of rotated vertebrae, and in more severe cases, deformed vertebrae.
There are many congenital variations in the vertebral structures ( such as cervical ribs, extra vertebrae, cleft vertebrae, etc) and certain variants many contribute to scoliotic out comes. It is said that the structure of the lumbosacral area is as individual as our faces.
Rotational and structural deformation of vertebrae can directly affect spinal nerve roots to organs and muscles, then cause pain and organ dysfunction. There are many examples given in the book. However, one of the most important 'take aways' may be the description of vertebral artery syndrome.
The vertebral arteries thread through little holes on the sides of the vertebrae in the neck. Rotation of the neck vertebrae ( from scoliosis ) can result in significant reduction of blood flow to important brain areas. Plus, there are individual variations in the actually boney structure of these holes. Neurological consequences include : dizziness, headaches, weakness, fatigue, vision problems ( like flashing lights in both eyes and blurry vision/more), periodic breathlessness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, numbness or tingling in hands/feet, slurred speech, drop attacks, and more.
It is important to appreciate that Doppler ultrasound may not be sufficient to diagnose vertebral artery syndrome, as the ultrasound can not imagine well through the boney vertebrae. The best test is an MR angiogram.

The name of the book : Scoliosis and Spinal Pain Syndrome : New Understanding of Their Origin and Ways of Successful Treatment by Professor Dr. Valentyn Serdyuk ( 2014)
Who has been diagnosed with scoliosis ? Has anyone been evaluated for vertebral artery syndrome ?
Interesting stuff. I have not been diagnosed with scoliosis or evaluated for vertebral artery syndrome but there's definitely something going on with my neck region and my ME/CFS.
 

Tammy7

Well-Known Member
Very interesting Merida..................the fact that scoliosis is running together with cfs/me in your family in my opinion is not a coincidence. In fact I dare say that it may very well be the same virus that caused both. I don't know if people realize that viruses can cause skeleton problems.............but the information is out there.
 

Merida

Well-Known Member
Very interesting Merida..................the fact that scoliosis is running together with cfs/me in your family in my opinion is not a coincidence. In fact I dare say that it may very well be the same virus that caused both. I don't know if people realize that viruses can cause skeleton problems.............but the information is out there.
@Tammy7,

Interesting thought - viruses can cause scoliosis.? I think the answer is yes. My primary doc had polio as a kid, and developed scoliosis. He thinks the virus caused the scoliosis.
 

Lissa

Well-Known Member
@Tammy7,

Interesting thought - viruses can cause scoliosis.? I think the answer is yes. My primary doc had polio as a kid, and developed scoliosis. He thinks the virus caused the scoliosis.
That's fascinating!!! Time for a scoliosis poll? And possibly with a viral twist?!
 

Lissa

Well-Known Member
Count me in with a kyphosis in the thoracic spine since I was young. Sick ALL the time as a kid. Curvature is getting worse with age, and after several injuries.

Also was told I have mild scoliosis about 1 year in to becoming fully disabled by ME/CFS. Things that make you go hmmm.....
 

lisaadele

Active Member
I'll add my hmmm.... to this too!!

As I mentioned in the other post (before seeing this one!) I also had an issue with spine and legs as a kid. Scoliosis in my family too. I never would have thought about these going together before. It is fascinating.
 

Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Shopping on Amazon.com For HR

Latest Resources

Top