Sensory Overload vs. Klonopin: Help!

Danesh

Active Member
(If this is in the wrong place, I hope someone lets me know how to post it where it should be!)
I'd like some thoughts, experiences, ideas on finding an alternative to Klonopin for sensory overload. I am very isolated socially, can rarely even see my own family. I learned from experience that Klonopin, given me for insomnia 12 years ago by my ME/CFS Doc also helps me tolerate sensory issues and improves cognitive function so that I am better able to have short family visits or get through a doctor appointment. But the negative effects long term (brain atrophy), and dependency are a concern, as I am nearly 58 now. (Already have a horror story about withdrawal experience, and it can last months or years with hypersensitive ME/CFS patients like me.) So far, I'm through 6 weeks of reducing it by 25% with help of LDN to sleep, and a GABA supplement for withdrawal symptoms. I'll stay at this level for a couple more months. But, then, I realize.... if I do this, how will I be able to have my granddaughters over for a half an hour? I can't go off Klonopin if it means I'm even MORE isolated and sick. So, an alternative, anyone?
Also, any references to other sites, forums or articles that you know this issue is discussed would be greatly appreciated.
 

Paw

Well-Known Member
If you're able to access cannabis, I would think it's the most helpful alternative, with none of the downsides you're dealing with. There would be a learning curve when it comes to choosing the most appropriate strain, dosage, method of dosing, etc, but many people have found great relief from it.
 

Remy

Administrator
(If this is in the wrong place, I hope someone lets me know how to post it where it should be!)
I'd like some thoughts, experiences, ideas on finding an alternative to Klonopin for sensory overload. I am very isolated socially, can rarely even see my own family. I learned from experience that Klonopin, given me for insomnia 12 years ago by my ME/CFS Doc also helps me tolerate sensory issues and improves cognitive function so that I am better able to have short family visits or get through a doctor appointment. But the negative effects long term (brain atrophy), and dependency are a concern, as I am nearly 58 now. (Already have a horror story about withdrawal experience, and it can last months or years with hypersensitive ME/CFS patients like me.) So far, I'm through 6 weeks of reducing it by 25% with help of LDN to sleep, and a GABA supplement for withdrawal symptoms. I'll stay at this level for a couple more months. But, then, I realize.... if I do this, how will I be able to have my granddaughters over for a half an hour? I can't go off Klonopin if it means I'm even MORE isolated and sick. So, an alternative, anyone?
Also, any references to other sites, forums or articles that you know this issue is discussed would be greatly appreciated.
I also think CBD would be what I would try first.

It's possible that a microglial inhibitor would help as well. You might check out the list here: https://www.healthrising.org/treating-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs/drugs-for-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs-treatment/microglial-inhibiting-drugs-combat-neuroinflammation/
 

Danesh

Active Member
Thanks Paw and Remy. LDN has helped me with sleep considerably, and I believe may be why I am able to, so far, reduce the nightly Klonopin. I take an ultra low dose, too sensitive, easily sedates me, as many drugs do. I'll check out the CBD and list of other microglial meds! I believe Cannabis was legalized last year here in Arizona, for medicinal use. Thanks so much.
 

Wayne

Well-Known Member
Hi Danesh,

Sound like a really difficult situation you're in; one I can relate to all too well.

I'm constantly on the lookout for things that might help support my brain and neurological function (especially to calm it down). Recently, I decided to try eating lots of raw egg yolks which I thought might help with my memory via acetylcholine production. Shortly after that, I decided to start eating a lot more chia seeds.

After only about 2-3 days, I noticed a new sense of groundedness and calm in my system. It was so noticeable, I decided to do a little more research on both of these foods. I learned that they're both very high in omega 3 fats, and very high in tryptophan (supports gaba production). Egg yolks are also very high in biotin (for nerves) and Vit. K2 (which apparently supports arterial health by preventing calcification).

I think there might have been another common factor that both of these two shared, but can't think of it at the moment. Just wanted to let you know that plenty of chia seeds (3-4 oz/day) and egg yolks (2-3/day) have helped me considerably.

Here's a LINK to an article on eggs in case you would want to check it out. The snippet below is a short bit from the article. A quick search on chia seeds will likely take you to some good information on how rich they are in omega-3s (comparable to salmon). The're rich in a number of other nutrients as well.

All the Best, Wayne

Protect Your Heart With Vitamin K2

Over the last decade, we have learned about the incredibly important role of vitamin K2 in protecting against heart disease. Most heart attacks and strokes occur because a plaque within an artery ruptures, causing a clot to develop that blocks the blood supply to the heart or brain. Plaques are much more likely to rupture when they accumulate calcium deposits, which makes them fragile. Vitamin K2 is the single most important nutrient that prevents our arteries from accumulating these calcium deposits.

Vitamin K occurs in two forms: vitamin K1 is found in leafy greens, while vitamin K2 is found in animal fats and fermented foods. When we eat leafy greens, the vitamin K1 has an easy time making it to our liver, where we use it to make proteins that regulate blood clotting, but it has a difficult time making it to our blood vessels, where we use it to make a special protein that protects our blood vessels from calcification. When we eat animal fats or fermented foods, the vitamin K2 does a great job reaching our blood vessels, and thereby helps us protect our blood vessels from calcification.

The groundbreaking study that elucidated the importance of egg yolks was The Rotterdam Study. The study followed just under 5,000 people from 1990 to 2000 and found that people who had the highest intakes of vitamin K2 had the lowest risk of arterial calcification and were the least likely to suffer or die from a heart attack. Amazingly, the two most important dietary sources of vitamin K2 were egg yolks and cheese!​
 

Zapped

Well-Known Member
(If this is in the wrong place, I hope someone lets me know how to post it where it should be!)
I'd like some thoughts, experiences, ideas on finding an alternative to Klonopin for sensory overload. I am very isolated socially, can rarely even see my own family. I learned from experience that Klonopin, given me for insomnia 12 years ago by my ME/CFS Doc also helps me tolerate sensory issues and improves cognitive function so that I am better able to have short family visits or get through a doctor appointment. I can't go off Klonopin if it means I'm even MORE isolated and sick. So, an alternative, anyone?
Also, any references to other sites, forums or articles that you know this issue is discussed would be greatly appreciated.
If you're not familiar with the official handbook for Klonopin withdrawal you can search for it. It's by a senior medical doc in London, 80+. Ashton is her last name. I bought it ~12 years ago and used it to withdraw from 25+/- years of using KL, up to 10 mg daily. It's free to read online or pay $25 or so, which is worth the price. There's also a forum along with it - you'll have to search it out but seems it was referenced in the Ashton Manual.

What's this 'brain atrophy? Surely not from KL?

There's a definite technique for withdrawal. (No problem quitting with slow taper just don't go cold turkey.). I chose to reinstate as it does have its benefits, (.5 mg x 2 daily, i.e. low dose). I reasoned it out and there was no compelling reason not to use it. FWIW, I do the same with Adderall - take low dose for a year or so, then taper and stop for 6 months - year. I've done both successfully for period of 30 years (BTW, I'm a 'baby boomer', re age, etc.; I don't drink nor smoke, no 'drugs').

Many people feel compelled not to use an addicting substance even though there's really no downside to a judicial dose. Maybe you ought to reconsider the pros and cons of KL. Use the manual to help you assess. You may find it's less deleterious than a salt or sugar addiction (which I gave up, sugar, that is, which was/is harder than KL to go without, IMO, with potential lethal side effects).

If you need further systemic support, either way, you may try Amisulpride for social support and other. Search this forum for a complete discussion and details of where, when, how much, etc.

Good luck. It may not be such a problem, after all,~)
 

Danesh

Active Member
If you're not familiar with the official handbook for Klonopin withdrawal you can search for it. It's by a senior medical doc in London, 80+. Ashton is her last name. I bought it ~12 years ago and used it to withdraw from 25+/- years of using KL, up to 10 mg daily. It's free to read online or pay $25 or so, which is worth the price. There's also a forum along with it - you'll have to search it out but seems it was referenced in the Ashton Manual.

What's this 'brain atrophy? Surely not from KL?

There's a definite technique for withdrawal. (No problem quitting with slow taper just don't go cold turkey.). I chose to reinstate as it does have its benefits, (.5 mg x 2 daily, i.e. low dose). I reasoned it out and there was no compelling reason not to use it. FWIW, I do the same with Adderall - take low dose for a year or so, then taper and stop for 6 months - year. I've done both successfully for period of 30 years (BTW, I'm a 'baby boomer', re age, etc.; I don't drink nor smoke, no 'drugs').

Many people feel compelled not to use an addicting substance even though there's really no downside to a judicial dose. Maybe you ought to reconsider the pros and cons of KL. Use the manual to help you assess. You may find it's less deleterious than a salt or sugar addiction (which I gave up, sugar, that is, which was/is harder than KL to go without, IMO, with potential lethal side effects).

If you need further systemic support, either way, you may try Amisulpride for social support and other. Search this forum for a complete discussion and details of where, when, how much, etc.

Good luck. It may not be such a problem, after all,~)
Zapped: Thanks so much, this is valuable info for me. Yes, sugar is harder! My psychiatric NP, who is the most knowledgeable dr I have, said several years ago, they discovered brain shrinkage in patients who had been on Klonopin long term. But, I am looking at pros and cons too, I appreciate your thoughtful advice.
 

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