The "Human anti-mouse Antibody" (HAMA) response

Discussion in 'Other Research' started by Not dead yet!, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. Not dead yet!

    Not dead yet! Well-Known Member

    In this case I must give a big hand to wikipedia for its clear and concise explanation of something I stumbled on today:

    Article: For several decades, and until recently, mice were used extensively in the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). But the treatments were not as effective as doctors had hoped. One problem was that patients reacted to the mouse antibodies as if they were a foreign substance, and created a new set of antibodies to the mouse antibodies. Doctors have termed this the “HAMA response,” referring to the development of Human Anti-Mouse Antibodies (HAMA). The HAMA response is essentially an allergic reaction to the mouse antibodies that can range from a mild form, like a rash, to a more extreme and life-threatening response, such as renal failure. HAMA can also decrease the effectiveness of the treatment, or create a future reaction if the patient is given a subsequent treatment containing mouse antibodies.[3]

    It has been observed that anywhere from one-third to more than half of patients receiving mouse-derived antibodies will develop some form of HAMA response.[4] Even more startling, at least ten percent of the general population has been observed to carry some form of animal-derived antibodies, most often from mice, due to the preponderance of medical agents made from the serum of animals.[5]


    This left me wondering whether Judy Mikovitz PhD (one of the researchers who studied XMRV and other MLV's before her downfall) might have touched an even more raw nerve in medicine than we suspect. I mean sure, antivaxxing and all that... but threaten the massively lucrative cancer business and... well we know what happened. Maybe it touched more than one raw nerve.

    I ended up there because I got to wondering what tests are available to test for adrenal insufficiency from OTC labs. And one of the warnings about one of the tests was about HAMA messing it up, possibly. I was like, huh? what's that?

    Anyone heard of it? News to me.
     
    Merry likes this.
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