Turn off the Circuit Breaker for Bedroom!

About six weeks ago our power company came out to our house and put a brand new shiny meter on the house. It was the AMR type of Smart Meter and within a few days my me/cfs symptoms were galloping and my healthy husband had an angry red rash that started at his ankles and within a few days it had covered every inch of his body and we were in the emergency room.

They said it was a 'viral infection', lol, you know that thing they say when they don't have a clue. This 'viral' infection gave him no fever or typical viral symptoms at all. I woke up one night with pounding heart, ears ringing and said we have to sleep somewhere else so the air mattresses came out and we were finally able to get some sleep in our loft. One other odd thing we were both exceedingly thirsty and after chugging down some Snapple peach tea we looked at each other and said - what's wrong with this? It didn't taste at all like the peach tea we love.

Thankfully, just as we're wondering what had come to pass to affect us like that I got a health email from Dr. Mercola's site that was all about smart meters. After spending a few days online reading about these monsters we had a pretty good idea of what the matter was.

First, called utility who said these were a 'special' type of smart meter that didn't harm your health. I did my research on this type of meter and found that indeed it is different from the most common AMI meter, but it was actually worse since it created much more 'dirty electricity' as well as the emf radio frequency that was MUCH higher than the EPA says is safe. Another call to the utility to 'opt-out' and after they stopped laughing said there was no such thing.

So, we began doing lots of research on how to mitigate both the emfs and the dirty electricity. After getting a 'smart meter cage' for outside we still had a way too high reading inside - if you are going to check yours get one of the Cornet 88D meters, it is the most affordable one that is accurate. - so after chatting with lessemf.com site we got something called 'giron' - 2 sheets of it - that we framed and hung over the breaker box - which is in our bedroom by the way - and thankfully that got the rf frequency down to a safe level.

We also found some items to cut down the ems from our laptops and also turned the wi-fi off and went direct wire to the router, got rid of a dimmer switch in the dining room and got rid of the cordless phones - all things that send out enormous and very unhealthy amounts of emfs. You also don't want to keep your cell phone in your bedroom.

Lastly we got a Stetzer Meter to check for dirty electricity and found plenty! We found that we could throw the circuits on things we weren't using now, like electric heat in each room and saw the meter's bad readings go down. We have two pxdna filters coming that should take it all down to safe levels.

But one thing we did that made a huge difference in our sleep is at night we turn off the circuit for the bedroom and I can't tell you how much better sleep we are both getting. It is so simple!

To learn a lot more about how to mitigate these problems check out http://www.createhealthyhomes.com and to learn about all the terrible health effects these things can cause or aggravate check out this video

Hopefully you won't have the problems we had, but it is far more common than you think.
 

Rob Rainford

Active Member
Thanks,

Wireless router off at night, no cell phone in the bedrooms, switch off sockets. It's something I've been telling my wife for years :finger:

There are other factors too like formaldehyde, cleaning products, and manufactured plastic and wood products. AKA Sick Building Syndrome.
 
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Remy

Administrator
I also turn off the wifi at night, cell phone in airplane mode and went around the house with the Stetzer meter (distressing results). It's on my list to buy the filters as soon as I have a spare $1000. Might be my Christmas present to myself!
 

Hip

Well-Known Member
Professor Martin Pall thinks that calcium channel blocker drugs could mitigate electrosensitivity, since he posits that it is the voltage-gated calcium channels that pick up electromagnetic waves in electrosensitive people. Some info in this post.
 

Rob Rainford

Active Member
I just discovered I have a "stealth" meter. It looks like an analogue meter, but actually has a wireless transmitter hidden in it. :( Now to see how many hundreds of dollars to get it removed.

http://www.eiwellspring.org/smartmeter/StealthMeters.htm
Sneaky SOB's
We in the UK have had them rammed down our throats.
I think it would be safe to say all these wireless signals can't be good for the health.
 

Hip

Well-Known Member
I think it would be safe to say all these wireless signals can't be good for the health.
I don't think we can generalize. If you are not electrically sensitive, there may be nothing much to be concerned about.

Even for people who think they might be electrically sensitive, there have been dozens of studies on groups of people who claimed electrical sensitivity, and nearly all studies where unable to find any negative effects from electromagnetic waves (that is to say, the people in the group were unable to tell when the electromagnetic signal was on or off).

See this article where it states: "In a provocation study, an electrosensitive person sits in a room with the source of electromagnetic waves hidden from view: they don’t know whether it is switched on or not. There have been 36 such studies published to date. This is very active work. This field has not been neglected. Thirty-three have shown that the subjects were unable to tell if the signal was present or absent, and the other three were flawed."

That does not mean that there aren't any people who are genuinely electrosensitive; but there are may be people who think they are electrosensitive, but in fact are not.
 
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Rob Rainford

Active Member
I don't think we can generalize. If you are not electrically sensitive, there may be nothing much to be concerned about.

Even for people who think they might be electrically sensitive, there have been dozens of studies on groups of people who claimed electrical sensitivity, and nearly all studies where unable to find any negative effects from electromagnetic waves (that is to say, the people in the group were unable to tell when the electromagnetic signal was on or off).

See this article where it states: "In a provocation study, an electrosensitive person sits in a room with the source of electromagnetic waves hidden from view: they don’t know whether it is switched on or not. There have been 36 such studies published to date. This is very active work. This field has not been neglected. Thirty-three have shown that the subjects were unable to tell if the signal was present or absent, and the other three were flawed."

That does not mean that there aren't any people who are genuinely electrosensitive; but there are may be people who think they are electrosensitive, but in fact are not.

Some research will shoot any dangers down while others say there is a risk.
We've been there with phone masts and electricity carrying pylons, mobile phones and microwaves to name a few.

After being forced to retire from the Electrical engineering industry due to illness and knowing the dangers, I'm firmly in the sceptics camp regarding EMFs.

I'll leave it there for others who are interested to research and come to their own conclusions.
 
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Hip

Well-Known Member
@Rob Rainford, I think we may be talking about two different things: I am referring to electromagnetic hypersensitivity, a condition where people say exposure to electromagnetic fields rapidly triggers certain symptoms in them. An analogy would be sunlight triggering a rash.

The ill health effects of long term exposure to electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields is another issue. An analogy would be long term exposure to sunlight over many years leading to melanoma.
 
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Rob Rainford

Active Member
@Rob Rainford, I think we may be talking about two different things: I am referring to electromagnetic hypersensitivity, a condition where people say exposure to electromagnetic fields rapidly triggers certain symptoms in them. An analogy would be sunlight triggering a rash.

The ill health effects of long term exposure to electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields is another issue. An analogy would be long term exposure to sunlight over many years leading to melanoma.
@Hip

You're talking about "Electromagnetic Radiation". I wasn't talking about "Electromagnetic fields"
We worked with equipment that give off both of the above. You are never told of any dangers in newer technology because of the revenue making issue. The only time we do hear about it is when people bring lawsuits against companies.

Now we have two camps. One that argues "Electromagnetic Radiation" is dangerous. And another that say it isn't.
Who's telling the truth? IMO short term test don't prove anything. I could also say some of those carrying out the tests 'may' have a conflict of interest. Of course this hasn't been proven.

Take the Hep C jab I had. I'm 90% sure this was the cause of my CFS.
Others say the jab never affected them and their condition was caused by another factor. Others including me are almost certain the injection caused us to become ill, but who do we test this theory on?
Who if anyone will admit to the long term dangers caused by everyday items unleashed upon us in the form of consumer goods, medicines etc?
 

Hip

Well-Known Member
IMO short term test don't prove anything.
For electromagnetic hypersensitivity testing, short-term tests are fine, because electromagnetic hypersensitivity is a short-term phenomenon: you are exposed to EM fields, and symptoms rapidly appear (according to those who say they are electromagnetically sensitive).

If you are talking about general ill health effects of magnetic, electric and electromagnetic fields, then I agree, you would require a long period of testing, over many years.
 

Remy

Administrator
I have no idea what the cumulative effect of all this constant 24/7 EMF exposure is on the body. But in light of all the studies I've read, I think it's worth being as cautious as possible without making oneself nuts. For example, I don't think kindergarteners need wifi.
 

Hip

Well-Known Member
I agree that cautious approach is a good idea.

Originally I had the two computers in the house connected to the router by ethernet cable, so that I could switch off the WiFi. But then in recent years, since the advent of tablets, it's hard to get by without WiFi, so I switched the WiFi on again, but I placed the router at the far end of the house, away from by bedroom and away the room where I work on my desktop computer during the day.

I also swapped the DECT cordless telephone for a model that does not broadcast radio signals 24 hours a day. Most DECT cordless phones constantly broadcast radio signals, whether they in use or not; but the Gigaset cordless phones only emit electromagnetic radiation when the phone is in use (when you put it in EcoMode Plus).


But I think in these discussion on electromagnetic fields, it is important not to raise people's anxiety about these issues, as the anxiety may be worse for the health than the electromagnetic radiation itself!
 
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dejurgen

Well-Known Member
I am not (yet?) on board with the idea that electrosensitivity is such a big problem. But the observations may be correct. What I mean is:

Many electronic devices produce tiny sine-wave-like sounds. To be theorethical correct: have narrow bandwidth peaks of sonic/ultrasonic sound emmision. Anyone who heared an audible pure sine wave test tone knows how annoying/enervating/painfull they can be. And someone knowing a bit about audio knows they are far more annoying/enervating/painfull at simmilar power levels then "normal" wide-band audio or noise. (Think of what a dog whistle does to a dog as an example)

I have a reasonable good hearing and I get really annoyed/messed up when I hear such signal when others often don't. It's often low power and at the edge of the hearable spectrum. When I am at a new place or there is a new source of such sounds I sometimes go on a hunt at night. Can't stand it!

There are indications that sound that are continous but not perceived can do the same (like from a TV set or computer monitor's coil) and that near-ultrasonic sounds can do the same. It's not because we don't perceive them that the brain does not register them. And anyone having heared these high frequency test sounds know how harsh they can be as a sensory overload. We ME/FM patients are prone to sensory overload.

Many will argue that most of these signals are very far out of the reach of what is audible. I agree but there does exists something as non-linear intermodulation that converts some of the energy to the aubible spectrum.

Remember the old days when one could hear when someone was calling you on the cell phone before it rang because the nearby audio installation began zooming and buzzing? Yet GSM and FM/AM or audio are at non-overlapping frequencies. That's what intermodulation does: converting one frequency to another. (A more technical explanation would be that the varying power consumption of a wireless devices creates intermodulation at the coil of the power converter of said device; patatoes patatas thing ;-)).
 

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