Wearables 2021

Female

Member
I enjoyed Cort's article

I do already have an Apple Watch, and have used it to monitor my steps in an effort to prevent overtraining. But it hasn't been of much use. (Like many of you, I'd love to be more active than I'm currently able.)

If I get a Oura Ring, do you think that I could just wear it at night to prevent overtraining? Or does it need me to give it daytime data, as well?

I gather that the Oura Ring provided more usable info than does the Apple Watch?

Thanks in advance.
 

Apo Sci

Well-Known Member
I use the Welltory HRV app on an android phone. It works well in the seated position following the instructions to rest 3 min and breathe normally.
 

Female

Member
Answering my own question:
I just wear the Oura Ring at night. Sometimes, it will tell me to take it easy for the day. (Based in HR, temp, HRV, sleep amount...)
Since I'm not good at listening to my own body, and often feel great before I crash, I'm finding this ring very helpful.
(Once it detected an elevated temperature, that later turned out to be a sinus infection.) (I confirmed this with a conventional thermometer.) So I probably avoided a crash by listening to the Oura Ring.
 

jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
I don't need apps to tell me what to do with my body. Nor a ring, I use my common sense with my body and all life.
 

Female

Member
That’s great that you don’t need apps to tell you what to do with your body.
For some of us they are helpful in telling us when to cut back on exertion so we don’t have unnecessary setbacks.
 

Get Our Free ME/CFS and FM Blog!



Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Latest Resources

Top