What is Encephalitis? Symptomatically It's Quite Like ME/CFS and FM

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
The big difference is that it's presented as an "acute" but not chronic illness. But why can't be chronic as well? Plus many cases of ME/CFS come on very acutely....Fatigue and pain are not mentioned but I imagine fatigue in particular is major. Encephalitis is actually inflammation. Headache is very common - something until recently I've never had. Could ME/CFS/FM patients with headache be in the encephalitis group?

Encephalitis is acute inflammation (swelling up) of the brain resulting either from a viral infection or when the body's own immune system mistakenly attacks brain tissue. The most common cause is a viral infection.

Adult patients with encephalitis present with acute onset of fever, headache, confusion, and sometimes seizures. Younger children or infants may present irritability, poor appetite and fever.[3] Neurological examinations usually reveal a drowsy or confused patient. Stiff neck, due to the irritation of the meninges covering the brain, indicates that the patient has either meningitis or meningoencephalitis.


In more severe cases the person may experience very severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, confusion, disorientation, memory loss, speech problems, hearing problems, hallucinations, as well as seizures and possibly coma. In some cases the patient can become aggressive.

Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by a lumbar puncture procedure usually reveals increased amounts of protein and white blood cells with normal glucose, though in a significant percentage of patients, the cerebrospinal fluid may be normal.

Primary (infectious) encephalitis: according to the NHS (UK), there are three main categories of viruses: 1. Common viruses, such as HSV (herpes simplex virus) or EBV (Epstein Barr virus). 2. Childhood viruses, such as measles and mumps. 3. Arboviruses, which are spread by mosquitoes, ticks and other insects, and include Japanese encephalitis, West Nile encephalitis and tick borne encephalitis.

Secondary (post-infectious) encephalitis: could be caused by a complication of a viral infection. Symptoms start to appear days and even weeks after the initial infection. The patient's immune system treats healthy brain cells as foreign organisms that need to be destroyed, and attacks them. We don't know why the immune system goes wrong and does this.

Encephalitis is more likely to affect children, elderly people, individuals with weakened immune systems, and people who live in areas where mosquitoes and ticks that spread specific viruses are common.

 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Interesting that my doc who is treating me for protomyzoa rheumatica (a malaria type Protozoa) and Lyme disease is aware of the surgery for CCSVI - but says it will not work long term. It clogs back up after a certain time. The doc in CA who does the surgery says the results are not proving to be long term for some Lyme patients and he indicated that only some of the symptoms improved - not all of them. I'll try to post the link.

Getting to the root or core cause is what will help the problem - not masking it with meds that dehydrate or temporarily putting a bandaid on it with surgery (if this is the cause) will fix it. We have to find the cause. IF The immune system if not working properly it will not erridicate the organisms and until that can happen - there may be problems. Biofilm that house - virus, bacteria and Protozoa can clog the veins and cause dysfunction with the function of the veins and the ability for proper blood flows.

Addressing the lymphatic system (that has recently been also found in the brain) should help with fluids in the brain. Keeping hydrated is very important and not allowing the brain to shrink due to dehydration. There is a balancing act here.

For me, addressing MCAS made a difference in head pressure problems. There are a few animal studies pointing to mast cell degranulation leading to hydrocephalus.

Issie
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Interesting that my doc who is treating me for protomyzoa rheumatica (a malaria type Protozoa) and Lyme disease is aware of the surgery for CCSVI - but says it will not work long term. It clogs back up after a certain time. The doc in CA who does the surgery says the results are not proving to be long term for some Lyme patients and he indicated that only some of the symptoms improved - not all of them. I'll try to post the link.

Getting to the root or core cause is what will help the problem - not masking it with meds that dehydrate or temporarily putting a bandaid on it with surgery (if this is the cause) will fix it. We have to find the cause. IF The immune system if not working properly it will not erridicate the organisms and until that can happen - there may be problems. Biofilm that house - virus, bacteria and Protozoa can clog the veins and cause dysfunction with the function of the veins and the ability for proper blood flows.

Addressing the lymphatic system (that has recently been also found in the brain) should help with fluids in the brain. Keeping hydrated is very important and not allowing the brain to shrink due to dehydration. There is a balancing act here.

For me, addressing MCAS made a difference in head pressure problems. There are a few animal studies pointing to mast cell degranulation leading to hydrocephalus.

Issie
Interesting about the surgery not lasting....the system clogs up again! Somehow I'm not surprised....

I'm going to be doing more on encephalitis - autoimmune encephalitis - its a rapidly growing field.
 

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