2 distinct subclusters in Fibromyalgia?

Merry

Well-Known Member
Helio Rheumatology reports on Fibromyalgia research that reveals two subclusters.

Discriminant function analysis showed the two subclusters were distinct and varied by widespread pain and somatic symptoms. Patients in subcluster 1 were more likely to have higher widespread pain, unrefreshed sleep and somatic symptoms, while patients in subcluster 2 had more fatigue and cognitive symptoms with pain that was less widespread and not as intense.
http://www.healio.com/rheumatology/fibromyalgia/news/online/{37b1ec5c-16f8-4b38-8faf-cf5c806872cd}/patients-with-fibromyalgia-may-fit-one-of-two-distinct-subclusters

Original article:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acr.22626/full
 
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Paw

Well-Known Member
This study might be helpful in the continuing process of enlightening more healthcare providers (so they can better target treatment strategies), but don't you think the binary explanation is still overly simplistic? Wouldn't "a continuum" serve as a better description?

Of course I'm no researcher, but, when I compare my own experiences to the many others who describe theirs, it seems like we're describing a family of symptoms that fall under the FM umbrella, but that no two sufferers experience identically.

And... am I wrong in thinking that there's quite a bit of variance in possible causes as well? My neurologist thinks FM is the same thing as small-fiber neuropathy. My rheumatologist seems to disagree. So the rheumatologist is hesitant to apply the FM label to me, while the neurologist is not. Meanwhile my symptoms match up with the latest criteria, but not the 1990 criteria (because of inconsistency in the tender points).
 

Merry

Well-Known Member
This study might be helpful in the continuing process of enlightening more healthcare providers (so they can better target treatment strategies), but don't you think the binary explanation is still overly simplistic? Wouldn't "a continuum" serve as a better description?
I wondered the same thing.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
This study might be helpful in the continuing process of enlightening more healthcare providers (so they can better target treatment strategies), but don't you think the binary explanation is still overly simplistic? Wouldn't "a continuum" serve as a better description?

Of course I'm no researcher, but, when I compare my own experiences to the many others who describe theirs, it seems like we're describing a family of symptoms that fall under the FM umbrella, but that no two sufferers experience identically.

And... am I wrong in thinking that there's quite a bit of variance in possible causes as well? My neurologist thinks FM is the same thing as small-fiber neuropathy. My rheumatologist seems to disagree. So the rheumatologist is hesitant to apply the FM label to me, while the neurologist is not. Meanwhile my symptoms match up with the latest criteria, but not the 1990 criteria (because of inconsistency in the tender points).
I think they're a long way from understanding the heterogeneity in fibromyalgia but it's good to see them starting the process.
 

KweenPita

Active Member
Actually Holland Researcher says there are 4. But I can't find the blasted articles! It also mentioned Parvovirus B19, and if I am remembering right, started research in 1991. HELP, it's bugging me to distraction.
 

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