B12 Antivitamins in Supplements and B12 Testing

Newer findings show that 10-30% of the vitamin B12 in vitamin supplements are metabolized to inactive derivatives/derivates(?) and to subtances with antivitamin character by/ because of the redox potential of vitamin C and B1, copper, iron and other antioxidants
- Nutrition of the Human/ Ernährung des Menschen by Ibrahim Elmadfa and Claus Leitzmann, p.476

I have a sublingual b12 supplement which contains vitamin C, so I ordered another one without it.

Around a third of vitamin B12 in serum belong to not vitamin active corrinderivatives. Due to this, microbiological tests often don't show a deficiency, since normal vitamin B12 levels (including not active corrinderivatives) are found.
- Nutrition of the Human/ Ernährung des Menschen by Ibrahim Elmadfa and Claus Leitzmann, p.475

I am a bit shocked by these two quotes, I found them in a book and cannot find any similar information confirming this online.
 

pamojja

Active Member
I took in average 25 g of ascorbic acid throughout a day for the last 13 year. And experienced remissions from a walking-disability from PAD, a COPD, and finally from permanent PEMs.

I tested all kind of vitamin B12 blood tests repeatedly: cobalamin, holo-transcobalamin and metylmalonic acid (also urinary). And advise to do so anyway, - there are too many ways one could be deficient, especially in such an important vitamin as B12.
 

jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
I have taken 1000mcg of Methyl B12 for many years and got up pretty high and then in the last
few years have backed down and wasn't taking it as I have and my recent labs show a big decline
in B12, so back the my regime. Levels do drop if they are not kept up.
 

pamojja

Active Member
I have taken 1000mcg of Methyl B12 for many years and got up pretty high
Blood test for cyanocobalamin B12 are completely unreliable. If too much is in the blood it could as well mean your body is unable to metabolize it, in the opposite: still deficient.

That's why there are much more relyable B12 test like holo-transcobalamin and metylmalonic acid. Please to inform yourself of the shortcomings and advantages of certain test. Most doctors don't really care.

Also a high homocystein is a sure marker, you're lacking in either B12, B9, B6, B2 or choline.
 

pamojja

Active Member
In my 14 years of health odysee I learnt a lot by discussions in thousands of posts and responses in health forums, other online infromation sides, and linked studies.

But the differences and relyability of lab-tests can also be found in books, like for example this old one (though I can't understad why it costs so much now): https://www.amazon.com/Micronutrients-Metabolic-Tuning-Prevention-Therapy/dp/3804750397

Labtestanalyser.com I registered for a short time, also has lots of information about virtually all different lab-tests. Part of which can also be found on its parent blog selfhacked.com.

Finally I found those informations numerous times in my own lab-test confirmed: cyanocobalamin can be higher then measureable, but for example metylmalonic acid, a metabolite of its proper utilization, still showing deficient.
 

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