Covid vaccinations emit RF signals despite being nonmagnetic, may cause sterility

Apo Sci

Well-Known Member
I caught this article about the covid vaccines which tries to minimize the fact that they are emitting RF signals in large amounts.

Videos and stories have been circulating online of individuals using EMF readers to show low EMF readings on non-vaccinated individuals, higher EMF readings on bluetooth devices and wireless networks, and high EMF readings on vaccinated individuals at their vaccination site on their arm.
[Are vaccine injections emitting electric and magnetic fields? (health-desk.org)]

This research article shows that the injection sites are showing RF skin reactions.

Acute skin reactions were observed in 2 RT patients with differing timelines of RT and vaccinations. In both cases however, the RRP presented within days of the patient receiving the second dose of vaccine. For each RT course, the treatment planning dosimetry of the radiation fields was compared with the area of the observable RRP. RRP developed within the borders of treatment fields where prescription dose constraints were prioritized over skin sparing.
There is no reason that a normal person should be doing this.

Emission of radiation may lower male fertility (involuntary sterilization), cause cancer and shorten lifespan (depopulation). If advanced it could be used for tracking on a 5g network.

The magnetism isn't limited to the injection site. Patients are posting videos of magnets sticking to their foreheads.
 
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Apo Sci

Well-Known Member
It's a case where it could be absolutely true ... yet meaningless. The vaccination site might be warmer due to inflammation, and warmth means that it radiates EMF in the form otherwise known as infra-red light.



Skin is sticky. Things, magnetic or not, will stick depending on weight, position, surface texture.
This is ridiculous.
 

dejurgen

Well-Known Member
I caught this article about the covid vaccines which tries to minimize the fact that they are emitting RF signals in large amounts.

[Are vaccine injections emitting electric and magnetic fields? (health-desk.org)]

This research article shows that the injection sites are showing RF skin reactions.
The first article, from health-desk.org, is a very poor and wrong interpretation by someone having read the real research article titled "COVID-19 Vaccine-Induced Radiation Recall Phenomenon" from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33677050/ that says:

"Radiation recall phenomenon (RRP) is an uncommon, late occurring, acute inflammatory skin reaction that emerges in localized areas coincident with previously irradiated radiation therapy (RT) treatment fields."

=> This means that when people had previous radiation therapy, for example for lung cancer treatment, they had part of the chest or back skin exposed to radiation and that skin (and all the tissue in between it and the lung) got exposed to radiation from the cancer radiation therapy. That causes some collateral damage to all that tissue hence including to the patch of skin that received radiation during that therapy too.

Then, when a later inflammatory event happens, those damaged tissues may be prone to a localized increase in inflammation too.

Compare it to what happened when I had the flu. Several months before I got the flu, I was hit by a car. My knee did hurt bad for several days in a row due to the impact. I had taken a big shock near one knee. Luckily, the bumper of the car just missed my knee so nothing was broken. The pain resolved after one or two weeks.

A week after I got the flue, several months after the accident, that knee started to swell a lot and fill with fluid. It hurt very bad and I couldn't walk on it for about two weeks. I had a high fever coinciding with it. That was after the fever of the initial flu had subsided.

=> So, zones that are previously damaged by something else are more prone to a later and different inflammatory event.

All vaccines do provoke an immune response in order to try and train the immune system against a pathogen. So, vaccines do have quite a chance to temporarily provoke inflammation in the body. That includes at the injection site (local temporary muscle pain is a common complaint) and more generalized through the body (temporary fever and head aches are also a common complaint). Nothing is new here.

=> So, nothing in this https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33677050/ research work says anything about radiation being emitted! It says that the researchers detected two cases of patients who had previously irradiated patches of skin saw a temporary increase in inflammation on those patches of skin. Inflammation does not equal EMF or radiation!

As too
Skin is sticky. Things, magnetic or not, will stick depending on weight, position, surface texture.

This is ridiculous.
It is not ridiculous. I just did a test. I have a small plastic USB stick. It lays on my table. I pressed my index finger strongly against it. I lifted my index finger and the USB stick lifted almost half a centimeter on one side up from the table. So: my fingers are sticky even if I washed them like fifteen minutes before it. Lighter objects, like a grain of rice stick a lot better and longer. Light magnets stick longer too. If objects are stuck to a vertical site (ones forehead) they stick longer too. In this case, it is Creekside that has the stronger science.
 

jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
So so much unknown and lots of info coming out and NOT from Govt and their buddies.

And to think the millions who flocked to them, bought the push from the govt.
 

Creekside

Active Member
This is ridiculous.
Things stick to skin mostly because of electrostatic bonding: I think it's mostly hydrogen atoms involved in the bonding (a magnet will have a very thin film of water, meaning hydrogen atoms). This is a very short-range effect (atomic scale). Magnetic strength decreases with the cube of the distance. So, to tell whether 'magnets sticking to the forehead' is due to magnetic force or electrostatic sticking, try this experiment:

Hold the magnet slightly close to a steel surface, and it will pull closer and snap tight.
Now try the same with skin (forehead if you prefer). If there's no attractive force (snaps tight to the skin), it's not a magnetic phenomena, it's just skin being 'sticky'.
 

Apo Sci

Well-Known Member
Things stick to skin mostly because of electrostatic bonding: I think it's mostly hydrogen atoms involved in the bonding (a magnet will have a very thin film of water, meaning hydrogen atoms). This is a very short-range effect (atomic scale). Magnetic strength decreases with the cube of the distance. So, to tell whether 'magnets sticking to the forehead' is due to magnetic force or electrostatic sticking, try this experiment:

Hold the magnet slightly close to a steel surface, and it will pull closer and snap tight.
Now try the same with skin (forehead if you prefer). If there's no attractive force (snaps tight to the skin), it's not a magnetic phenomena, it's just skin being 'sticky'.
Except that the stickiness is only at the vaccinated arm site and the other side isn't.
 

dejurgen

Well-Known Member
Except that the stickiness is only at the vaccinated arm site and the other side isn't.
I recently read about a professor doing a few quick tests and indeed (against what I expected) confirmed that: only the arm that got vaccinated is more sticky BUT the additional stickiness ALSO holds for (completely non magnetic) plastic objects.

The professor is not going to look into it further as he sees (and I agree) that that is enough "proof" (for believers of this "vaccines make you magnetic and use it as a tracking device" conspiracy) that it has nothing to do with magnetism. He believes it has to do with the temporary increased in inflammation on that side. Inflammation changes liquid balance like for example more sweating or more salty sweat and such. Those can determine stickiness.

That inflammation temporary (has fair chances to) increases is tricky for us with ME/FM/POTS/... but is know and not hidden from the public.

Actually, while not good, so many people in this massive vaccination campaign with a fairly strong vaccine against a fairly strong disease having some sort of reaction to vaccines might be a silver lining for us in this Covid disaster.

Finally, more attention may be going to the many complaints of us ME/FM/POTS/... people with repeated strong reactions to "simple" vaccines like the flu vaccine. Up till now, "you can't react that strong or long to a simple and benign vaccine" was the common position of the medical establishment, disregarding the poor experiences of people with a weird / upset immune system like our communities.

I took a vaccination and am doing fairly OK with it but increased my pacing and paying attention to food intolerance a whole lot while on it. I feel the benefits outweigh the risk. In the future, more awareness of not everyone just getting over a simple vaccine without trouble may make them safer and easier to tolerate for even us.
 
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jaminhealth

Well-Known Member
Data continues to flow on the deaths and injuries and with the toxic vaccines. I can't imagine putting them in my body.

Oops, we made a mistake!!!!!


 
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Apo Sci

Well-Known Member
Data continues to flow on the deaths and injuries and with the toxic vaccines. I can't imagine putting them in my body.

Oops, we made a mistake!!!!!


It gets better. The purpose of the RF transmission from the injection sites is to connect to bluetooth so they can monitor your last location and health status so when you die of prion disease they can recover your body and bury it in the FEMA coffin liners. Here's what happens when a vaccinated person gets close to a smart tv. Two links.

Brighteon

Bluetooth Vaccine? Injected COVID Vax Tries to Connect With Devices (thefreedomarticles.com)
 

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