Introduction and request for help

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Neil, Mar 23, 2017.

  1. Neil

    Neil New Member

    My apologies. This isn't the best way to introduce myself, I know, but ...

    My name is Neil Brooks. I'm 52 years old. I was declared permanently disabled due to chemically burned eyes. I've been disabled since 2004.

    And I lost everything -- my home, my life's savings, and my health -- simply because I needed, and asked, to be able to sleep in my first-ever, brand new home in Fort Collins, Colorado.

    Yes, I am a PWME.

    Against medical advice, I flew to Stanford in 9/2016 to be seen in Jose Montoya's clinic where I received my Dx. Despite significant risks, I am currently on LDN, Valtrex, and Doxycycline (along with piles of supplements), but I'm still getting worse.

    Like many of you, I've battled with my health for decades. ME/CFS seems like the grand unifying diagnosis I've been chasing after for all these years. But I've always been able to manage it ... at least reasonably well.

    Until I moved into that house in Colorado.

    This is my story:

    http://nbeener.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-destruction-of-medically-disabled.html

    OR: Google: The Destruction of a Disabled Man in Colorado

    I have to imagine that many/most of you can imagine what would have happened to your health in this situation.

    I'm asking for your help.

    I'm asking people to do two simple things:

    1) Share my story via social media, and

    2) Send a short email to the editors of these Colorado media outlets, asking them to cover my story.

    Nobody needs to vouch for me. Nobody needs to take a position about what happened. Just ... ask them to cover the story of what really happened to Neil Brooks in Fort Collins.

    The email addresses:

    KathyJack@coloradoan.com, lgustus@coloradoan.com, JStahla@Reporter-Herald.com, ggriffin@denverpost.com, lcolacioppo@denverpost.com, susan@coloradoindependent.com, greeneindenver@gmail.com, lshapley@denverpost.com, patricia.calhoun@westword.com, JohnFerrugia@rmpbs.org, LoriGliha@rmpbs.org, marybelgonzalez@rmpbs.org

    Nearly 1 in 2 Americans lives with chronic illness. That number is rising. The overwhelming majority of these chronic illnesses are 'invisible,' like ours. Being disabled doesn't necessarily mean using a wheelchair.

    You all know that.

    Apparently, not enough people do. We need to raise awareness in any way we can.

    My story is, at its core, the story of bullying of a disabled man. All I did was ask to be able to sleep in my new home. Nothing more. And the neighborhood -- with the help of the city -- went "Lord of the Flies" on me.


    I am now stuck living in Fort Collins again. I'm not well enough to move. As you can probably imagine, I'm intensely uncomfortable here, particularly because nobody has ever been held to account for what happened to me in this town.

    Please help me get accountability and raise awareness. Please. Help me reduce the odds that what happened to me ever happens to another sick or disabled person.

    My humble and sincere thanks,
    Neil
     
  2. Merida

    Merida Well-Known Member

    Neil,
    I read the entire account of what has happened. We all tend to be very sensitive, and have difficulty adapting to situations around us. Having said that, I have no doubt that it is critical that we focus on wellness, on getting well, and not how we are 'wronged' by the people around us. Redirect what energy you have.
     
    Ladyliegh likes this.
  3. Ladyliegh

    Ladyliegh Active Member

    Well said Merida. I too read what you posted.
    Neil I understand your frustration, but if you look at how much energy & money you have put into this, that could have been used to get healthy, it is easy to see that other choices could allow for you to focus on what's best for you. If you look at what will be gained by continuing this battle, v.s. what will be lost, it is a no brainer. You should put your health first, even if that means letting go of this battle. Being Right, will not give you your health back, neither will staying in a toxic environment. Please let the past go & plan a new life that puts what is best for your health first. That probably includes moving to a new place to begin a new life. All this anger & frustration is poison to your body.
    Focus on loving life & feeling joy again.
    You can't change anyone but yourself.:happy:
     
    Merida likes this.
  4. Neil

    Neil New Member

    I've always been glad that people have turned their personal tragedies into something positive.

    Off hand ....

    Amber Alert - the family of Amber Hagerman
    Megan's Law - the family of Megan Kanka
    MADD - the family of Cari Lightner
    Polly Klaas Foundation

    Just as I was too ill to move while it was all going on ... I'm too ill to move once again.

    If you think there's a stone I've left unturned (in getting my health back) ... I wish it were so.

    Anger doesn't fill my days. Dismay at what I was, and what I now am ... does haunt me, though.

    I would have appreciated your help.

    But it's truly okay.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
    Merida likes this.
  5. Merida

    Merida Well-Known Member

    @Neil
    I have great empathy and appreciation for where you are. Sorry my earlier post was so brief without much helpful info. I spent years being very 'upset' and angry. My story (briefly) is that I took a yoga class, hurt my right hip, went to a chiropractor who twisted and pushed my neck and pelvis with great force. Had never been, as I had no pain issues - except right hip on/off. I was working full time and well.

    I spent one year totally bed ridden, lost my bladder/ bowel sensations, severe pain, couldn't stand upright, severe GeRd, severe sleep disorder, multiple neuro/ hormonal issues, GI tract shut down for 6 weeks. Almost died. Terribly mistreated by my HMO - Kaiser - as I later found they held the malpractice insurance for this chiro. After we left the HMO, a neurosurgeon thought I had a cervical spinal cord injury and brain trauma from a possible dissection of the vertebral artery. So.. .

    The first thing I had to do, was to leave this horror behind. Lost my one year statute to file malpractice, as I was still bedridden. Each nite I named 5 things I was thankful for. It helped turn my thinking. Sometimes it was just having clean water to drink and a place to lie down. Then, I found a warm pool. Went 3 days a week for a year. Sometimes I just sat there. Very helpful in releasing anger and getting my body working again. Then, I started walking. At first, I could only go to bottom of short driveway.

    Massage was helpful. Reading was helpful : John Upledger , D. O. Talks about how emotions can be stored in our soft tissues and must be released to get well. Tried craniosacral, Reiki, QiGong, dowsing, any kind of alternative work I could find. Medication helped: Wellbutrin ( short acting), Neurontin, opiates. I got enough energy to lead a support group 13 years. We had every kind of wellness speaker imagineable. Most were no help, but some were.

    I found that this was a journey that I had to take. Meeting with others who were on the same path was helpful. Do you have a support group near by? This can be such a lonely journey.

    Also, if their is a drumming group nearby, that may help. Anything that can begin to open pathways to inner release and peace. You can learn to dowse at no cost. It is helpful.

    So, I have done all of this and more, but I still have lots of pain and severe fatigue, and crazy symptoms. Very frustrating. But, we can not give up hope of feeling better. Hugs. I appreciate how hard this is.
     
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  6. Not dead yet!

    Not dead yet! Well-Known Member

    Honestly I'd make sure that the position of your home doesn't cross the property line and is the proper distance from the property line, and put it up for sale. Either that or swap the living room/ bedroom positions. Lots of people have a back living room. It will also give you a chance to redesign the bedroom for maximum insulation of sound and light. Now that you own the place, you probably have equity you can borrow against. Borrowing for the purpose of "remodeling" is perfectly normal.

    I know it's not what you want to hear, advice from a stranger. But this illness is frustration enough without adding neighbor disputes to the mix. Put your health above this issue and make a list of things you can do that don't depend on others. If/when you look for a new home, you might do better in an HOA (planned housing development). They have lots of rules, some of them you won't like, but if a dog is barking, the HOA would come down really harshly on the owner.
     
    Merida likes this.
  7. Did you ever try sound cancellation ear plugs or one of those barking devices pointing toward the dogs? I think the attorney was very remiss in not explaining these cases often lose. Also curious if you ever contacted ADA for any assistance. Lastly why would you have been arrested if you were in compliance with the gun laws?
     
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