NAC for Neuroinflammation in ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia?

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
At the 2016 IACFS/ME Conference Dr. Shungu reported that 4 weeks of NAC supplementation (1800 mgs/day) increase GSH levels and, if I remember correctly, reduced lactate levels in the brains of ME/CFS patients. It also resulted in reduced symptoms and reduced blood levels of oxidative stress.

I'm going to start NAC!
 
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Prashanti

Member
I had been taking NAC for quite some time at a lower dose for liver health. I'm beginning higher doses also as I have also read about the effectiveness in treatment of CFS, Fibro and viral infections. Online I also found this at lifeextension.com:
  • NAC also regulates expression of scores of genes in the pathways that link oxidative stress to inflammation.
  • These dual effects give NAC a unique role in the prevention and treatment of many common diseases, both acute and chronic.
  • NAC can protect against avian influenza and more common seasonal flu symptoms.
  • NAC reduces the frequency and duration of attacks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may slow the clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
  • NAC protects tissues from the effects of exercise-induced oxidative stress, adding value and safety to your workout.
  • NAC improves insulin sensitivity in people with some of the most difficult-to-treat metabolic disorders.
  • NAC blocks cancer development at virtually every step in the process, and through multiple mechanisms, making it an important cancer chemopreventive agent.
 

ShyestofFlies

Well-Known Member
I took this before I got ME or CFS. It didn't do anything noticeable for my fibro, nor anything else. Still I'd give it a chance again, the only reason I stopped was the amount of large pills I had to take (6) for the reason I was taking it felt ridiculous.
 

rebar

Active Member
I'm in.
I wonder what the best method for benefit, empty stomach, after meal, with meal, blah, blah.
Any indication of what may be a better choice, I'm currently using Jarrow Sustain at 600mgs.

Was the Shungu study done using an oral supplement?

By the way Cort, I am humbled at your incredible gift, evidenced by your insightful, detailed tweets from the conference.
You are a gift to this community.
 

Remy

Administrator
Any indication of what may be a better choice, I'm currently using Jarrow Sustain at 600mgs.
This is the one I take as well.

I try to take on a empty stomach but since it's time released anyway, it may not be as crucial. First thing AM and last thing at bedtime.
 

rebar

Active Member
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Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I took this before I got ME or CFS. It didn't do anything noticeable for my fibro, nor anything else. Still I'd give it a chance again, the only reason I stopped was the amount of large pills I had to take (6) for the reason I was taking it felt ridiculous.
You know if you can take it I would just take even if it doesn't seem to be improving your symptoms; it may still be helping out with neuroinflammation.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I had been taking NAC for quite some time at a lower dose for liver health. I'm beginning higher doses also as I have also read about the effectiveness in treatment of CFS, Fibro and viral infections. Online I also found this at lifeextension.com:
  • NAC also regulates expression of scores of genes in the pathways that link oxidative stress to inflammation.
  • These dual effects give NAC a unique role in the prevention and treatment of many common diseases, both acute and chronic.
  • NAC can protect against avian influenza and more common seasonal flu symptoms.
  • NAC reduces the frequency and duration of attacks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may slow the clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
  • NAC protects tissues from the effects of exercise-induced oxidative stress, adding value and safety to your workout.
  • NAC improves insulin sensitivity in people with some of the most difficult-to-treat metabolic disorders.
  • NAC blocks cancer development at virtually every step in the process, and through multiple mechanisms, making it an important cancer chemopreventive agent.
What I really like this is the insulin sensitivity. Dr. Sullivan reported that intranasal insulin was helping GWS patients. Maybe NAC and intranasal insulin are good partners....???
 

Remy

Administrator
What I really like this is the insulin sensitivity. Dr. Sullivan reported that intranasal insulin was helping GWS patients. Maybe NAC and intranasal insulin are good partners....???
Well, I'm taking both, so I guess we'll see!
 

Seanko

Well-Known Member
How are people getting on with NAC?

My order arrived on Saturday..been taking 1000mg 2x a day. Would say significant increase in well being :)
(Taken in conjunction with L-citrulline, which is a pre-cursor to l-arginine...the tip coming from Fluge & Mella)
 

Seanko

Well-Known Member
The Shungu NAC abstarct from the IACFS/ME syllabus (Page 35)

IACFS/ME Syllabus 2016

N-Acetylcysteine Alleviates Cortical Glutathione Deficit and Improves Symptoms in CFS: An In Vivo Validation Study using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

N. Weiduschata , X. Maoa , D. Vub , M. Blateb , G. Kanga , H.S. Mangatc , A. Artisd , S. Banerjeed , G. Langeb , C. Henchcliffec , B.H. Natelsonb , D.C. Shungua

a Departments of Radiology, c Neurology and Neuroscience, and d Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA; b Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, USA;

OBJECTIVES We previously reported a robust 36% deficit of occipital cortex glutathione (GSH) – the primary tissue antioxidant – in patients with CFS compared to healthy comparison (HC) subjects, a finding that implicated oxidative stress in the disorder. The primary objective of the present study was to assess whether supplementing CFS patients with the GSH synthetic precursor N-acetylcysteine (NAC) daily for 4 weeks would spur in situ synthesis and significant elevation of cortical GSH compared to baseline, as assessed in vivo with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS).

METHODS For this pilot clinical study, we recruited 16 medication-free patients meeting the CDC criteria for CFS and 15 HC subjects. Following baseline measurement of occipital cortex GSH with 1 H MRS and administration of a battery of clinical assessments, both CFS and HC participants received a 4-week supplement of 1800mg NAC/day. After 4 weeks, identical 1 H MRS scan and clinical assessments were conducted to determine the effect of NAC on cortical GSH levels and on CFS symptoms as assessed with the CDC CFS symptom inventory.

RESULTS At baseline, controlling for age and race, cortical GSH levels were 15% lower in CFS than in HC (95%CI: -0.0005,0; p=0.04, one-tailed as the differences and direction of changes were postulated a priori). Following 4 weeks of daily NAC supplementation, cortical GSH levels rose significantly relative to baseline (95%CI: 0.0001,0.0006; p=0.004, one-tailed) in CFS patients to match those in HC, which did not differ compared to baseline (95%CI: - 0.0002,0.0003; p=0.33, one-tailed). Lastly, NAC supplementation markedly improved symptoms in CFS patients, with significant decreases in CDC CFS symptom inventory total scores (95%CI: -51.5-9.6; p=0.006), case definition scores (95%CI: -28.2-2 .0; p=0.03) and “other symptoms” scores (95%CI: -24.0-7.3; p<0.001). However, GSH levels did not correlate with any clinical measure.

CONCLUSION The results of this study have provided the very first direct evidence that NAC crosses the blood-brain barrier to spur in situ synthesis and elevation of cortical GSH. Significantly, increasing cortical GSH levels with NAC ameliorated symptoms in CFS patients. Future studies evaluating the clinical efficacy, and optimal dose and treatment duration of NAC are warranted.

Dikoma C. Shungu, Ph.D., Professor of Physics in Radiology, Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (FISMRM); Chief, Laboratory for Advanced MRS Research Citigroup Biomedical Imaging Center, Weill Cornell Medicine; 516 E 72nd Street, New York, NY 10065.
Email: dcs7001@med.cornell.edu.

Funding source: NIH Grant # 1 R21 NR013650.

There are no conflicts of interest to declare or disclose.
 
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Paw

Well-Known Member
I've been taking 750mg twice a day for at least a year, without thinking much about it. (Occasionally I'd notice maybe not feeling quite as well when I missed a dose.) Then I ran out, re-ordered, but didn't connect my week of "flu days" to its absence until I resumed taking it.Yesterday I realized I was suddenly sleeping better and overall felt less fluey.

I'm becoming a believer. Taurine seems a good complement too.
 

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