Naproxen, lowest risk of cardiovascular events amongst NSAIDS

Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
I just thought i would post this as nsaids such as celebrex are being mentioned as a treatment along with antivirals for fibro etc.
Although celebrex has a lower risk of stomache issues, naproxen has a much better cardiovascular safety profile than celebrex.
So one has to weigh up the risk to benefit ratio, but atleast there are alternatives. Below is a link from wikipedia but easy to find similar info online if one wants more references.

Adverse effects[edit]

COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs have been linked to increases in the number of serious and potentially fatal cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarctions and strokes. Naproxen is, however, associated with the smallest overall cardiovascular risks.[7][8] Cardiovascular risk needs to be taken into account when prescribing any non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drug. The drug had roughly 50% of the associated risk of stroke as compared with ibuprofen and was also associated with a reduced number of myocardial infarctions as compared to control groups.[7]As with other non-COX-2 selective NSAIDs, naproxen can cause gastrointestinal problems, such as heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, ulcers and stomach bleeding.[9] Persons with a history of ulcers or inflammatory bowel disease should consult a doctor before taking naproxen.
It was found that high-dose naproxen induced near-complete suppression of platelet thromboxane throughout the dosing interval and appeared not to increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, whereas other high-dose NSAID regimens had only transient effects on platelet COX-1 and were associated "with a small but definite vascular hazard". Conversely, naproxen was associated with higher rates of upper gastrointestinal bleeding complications in comparison to other NSAIDs.[8]
NSAID painkillers, such as naproxen, may interfere with and reduce the efficacy of SSRI antidepressan
ts
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naproxen
 

Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
WASHINGTON, DC – March 21, 2013 – The over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug naproxen may also exhibit antiviral activity against influenza A virus, according to a team of French scientists. The finding, the result of a structure-based investigation, is published online ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

New influenza vaccines must be developed annually, because the surface proteins they target mutate rapidly, the way cars used to get a whole new look every year. The researchers, led by Anny Slama-Schwok of the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy en Josas, France, found a much more stable, reliable target for anti-influenza activity. The so-called ribonucleoprotein complexes are necessary for replication, and the researchers realized they could target the nucleoprotein, preventing assembly of the complexes. Because of its vital function, the nucleoprotein is highly conserved, making it a good potential target for antiviral drugs.

The nucleoprotein’s three dimensional structure, solved in 2006, provided the basis for searching for new drugs that could interfere with its action. The researchers did a virtual screening within the Sigma-Aldrich online catalog of biochemicals. That screening identified Naproxen, better known as the over-the-counter pain reliever Aleve, and as expected, it bound to the nucleoprotein, and impeded RNA binding, says Slama-Schwok. In further testing, it reduced the viral load in cells infected with H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A virus, and in mice it demonstrated a therapeutic index against influenza A that was superior to that of any other anti-inflammatory drug.

Specifically, naproxen blocks the RNA binding groove of the nucleoprotein, preventing formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex, thus taking the vital nucleoproteins out of circulation. The researchers write that naproxen is a lead compound for drug development that could be improved by tweaking the molecule to boost its ability to bind to nucleoprotein.

As an already approved drug, naproxen could become a treatment against influenza relatively quickly, the researchers write. Its status as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which inhibits the COX-2 pathway, as well as an antiviral would boost its efficacy.

http://www.asm.org/index.php/88-news-room/journal-tipsheets/91573-pain-reliever-shows-anti-viral-activity-against-flu
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Strike me lucky, have you read anything on naproxen affect on kidney and liver function? I have issues with both and am not to use Tylenol or Advil.

I wouldn't use Celebrex knowing that it gave my mother in law a stroke. It helped her pain. But the stroke was the beginning of the end for her.

I find Turmeric and Ginger help with pain and inflammation and don't adversely affect liver or kidney function. Sometimes, they are not enough.

Issie
 

Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
Strike me lucky, have you read anything on naproxen affect on kidney and liver function? I have issues with both and am not to use Tylenol or Advil.

I wouldn't use Celebrex knowing that it gave my mother in law a stroke. It helped her pain. But the stroke was the beginning of the end for her.

I find Turmeric and Ginger help with pain and inflammation and don't adversely affect liver or kidney function. Sometimes, they are not enough.

Issie
Not off hand, but it would be hard on the liver and kidneys as other nsaids, might be worth looking it up.

Sounds like your doing the right thing using alternatives tumeric and ginger. Although i think thye more active form of tumeric is curcumin, but its more costly i think.

I dont use the anti inflammatories all the time. Many years ago i did have some GI bleeding from naprosyn treating my back. SO now i will use either naprosyn or mobic or celebrex for short periods when my back is playing up. mobic and celebrex are suppose to be more stomach friendly and once a day dosing is convenient, but i actually find naprosyn works better for pain, i think everyone is different.

i probably need to look into something like tumeric but i just take so many pills now?????
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
I have a few types of pain. For sciatic I take ibuprofen but I've had pretty good luck with Sea Mussel for hip pain.

I ran out one time and a few days later i really noticed it. I haven't tested it lately.

I'd like to find something instead of ibuprofen. I have breakthrough with mobic

I also think with curcumin you need to have black pepper with it. There are some combos
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
I tried curcumin and didn't get the results that I get with the whole herb. I get organic spice turmeric and ginger and cap my own. Tried going off and really noticed a difference.

I have to take RX meds for pain too, but I have to cycle it or it stops having a benefit. Since I have POTS and EDS this really helps both of those. I use Tramadol and Bentyl. Tramadol works on pain via Neurotransmitors (it's sometimes used off label to help resistant depression - thankfully I don't have depression often - and they think it works on opioid receptors ( but it's not an opiod) and it works on NMDA which has to do with glutamate. Bentyl is a muscle relaxer. They really aren't sure exactly how Tramadol works but it has been one of my best POTS meds. Calms my autonomic system down from being over active. Yet ironically can up noriepinephrine and the subset I am I have way to high levels with standing. We think this is a compensatory thing and good in the long run. It helps get blood to the heart and head - which is vitally necessary.

Any way, would rather go alternative than Western meds, but sometimes it's just necessary.

Haven't tried the green mussels. What benefit do you find from that?

Issie
 
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Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
@Issie thats interesting about curcumin. I might look at trying curcumin.

yes tramadol is the main painkiller I use. I can see how it could help pots/oi. When I first used it I found it increased energy and improved mood. As u said its probably its effects on neurotransmitters. I also found taking it at night worsened my sleep. I find it more affective for my back pain than other narcotic type pain killers. Strange thing is tramadol doesnt help for headached and migraines but narcotic/codeine type meds do help for this. Different types of meds for different pains.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
0 caps I take one to two a day. Same with Ginger. Just know it can thin your blood so consider that if needing surgery.
 

Issie

Well-Known Member
Curcumin was too potent for me and it didn't seem to have the good mood altering effects.
 

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