Cure for MS

Folk

Well-Known Member
Hey @Recliner
This has been arround for a while... It's kinda old news and there have been studies disproving it.
We can get on that "Big Pharma" vs "Simple Cure" subject though...

And I did a quick search on MS forums. I though he was not well seen but it seems people defend him.
 

Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
http://www.msra.org.au/QLD-breakthrough-progressive-ms

4th February, 2014


Professor Michael Pender

NEW Queensland research suggests that controlling Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection – the most common cause of glandular fever – may be beneficial in treating multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord affecting more than 23,000 Australians.

The study led by Professor Michael Pender with collaborators at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, and the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital describes a the use of a new treatment that boosts CD8 T cell immunity to EBV using a technique known as 'adoptive immunotherapy'.

While the treatment was conducted in a single person with secondary progressive MS, the promising results suggest that it could potentially be a useful treatment for progressive forms of MS and other chronic autoimmune diseases. There are currently no disease-modifying treatments available for progressive MS patients.

The researchers administered a six week treatment course to a 42 year old man with secondary progressive MS. The treatment had no adverse effects and within two weeks of commencing treatment the patient began to experience clinical improvement. These improvements were sustained up to the most recent follow-up 21 weeks later.

Results of the study were published today in the international Multiple Sclerosis Journal.

The treatment involves collecting immune cells known as T cells from the patient’s blood, growing them in the laboratory with an EBV vaccine and then transferring the cells back to the patient by intravenous infusion. The treatment was developed by Professor Rajiv Khanna of the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute to treat patients with EBV-related malignancy and does not require the use of any drugs.

This is the first use of this treatment, known as EBV-specific adoptive immunotherapy, to treat progressive MS.

Professor Pender said: 'The beneficial effect of boosting immunity to EBV by this treatment highlights the importance of impaired immunity to EBV in the development of MS. We believe the treatment corrects the impaired CD8 T cell immunity that allowed EBV infection to cause MS.'

The Brisbane patient, Mr Gary Allen, suffered what he now knows was his first MS attack in 1994 which led to a clinical diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS in 2000 and later progressed into secondary progressive MS. Since 2008 Gary has been unable to walk or transfer himself without assistance, but has remained working full-time from home.

Following the treatment, Gary experienced a significant reduction in fatigue and painful spasms, an improvement in thinking, memory, attention and hand function, and increased productivity at work. There was also reduced disease activity on his MRI brain scan. At the latest follow-up Gary also had improvement in leg movement.

Gary said the treatment enabled him to perform everyday tasks more easily such as actively assisting with showering, dressing and shopping, and spending more time with his son.

'It’s impossible to overstate the significance of the improvements I’ve enjoyed – whether you look at my work at Griffith University, time with family or resurgent social life, it’s been an amazing change for the better,' he said.

Professor Pender said that the symptom improvement was backed up by other evidence such as the reduction in disease activity on brain scans and reduction in antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid.

Professor Pender over the last 9 years has received over $1.2 million in funding via MS Research Australia's Project Grants. 'Treatments for progressive MS are one of the greatest needs,' commented Dr Matthew Miles, Chief Executive of MS Research Australia. 'We are delighted with the results of Professor Pender’s research and congratulate him on this outcome.'

This breakthrough study has profound implications globally for understanding the cause of MS and for the treatment of MS, particularly in its progressive phase, for which currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy.

A clinical trial is now needed to determine safety and therapeutic efficacy across the clinical spectrum of MS.

The full study can be viewed online at Multiple Sclerosis Journal
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
http://www.msra.org.au/QLD-breakthrough-progressive-ms

4th February, 2014


Professor Michael Pender

NEW Queensland research suggests that controlling Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection – the most common cause of glandular fever – may be beneficial in treating multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord affecting more than 23,000 Australians.

The study led by Professor Michael Pender with collaborators at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, and the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital describes a the use of a new treatment that boosts CD8 T cell immunity to EBV using a technique known as 'adoptive immunotherapy'.

While the treatment was conducted in a single person with secondary progressive MS, the promising results suggest that it could potentially be a useful treatment for progressive forms of MS and other chronic autoimmune diseases. There are currently no disease-modifying treatments available for progressive MS patients.

The researchers administered a six week treatment course to a 42 year old man with secondary progressive MS. The treatment had no adverse effects and within two weeks of commencing treatment the patient began to experience clinical improvement. These improvements were sustained up to the most recent follow-up 21 weeks later.

Results of the study were published today in the international Multiple Sclerosis Journal.

The treatment involves collecting immune cells known as T cells from the patient’s blood, growing them in the laboratory with an EBV vaccine and then transferring the cells back to the patient by intravenous infusion. The treatment was developed by Professor Rajiv Khanna of the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute to treat patients with EBV-related malignancy and does not require the use of any drugs.

This is the first use of this treatment, known as EBV-specific adoptive immunotherapy, to treat progressive MS.

Professor Pender said: 'The beneficial effect of boosting immunity to EBV by this treatment highlights the importance of impaired immunity to EBV in the development of MS. We believe the treatment corrects the impaired CD8 T cell immunity that allowed EBV infection to cause MS.'

The Brisbane patient, Mr Gary Allen, suffered what he now knows was his first MS attack in 1994 which led to a clinical diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS in 2000 and later progressed into secondary progressive MS. Since 2008 Gary has been unable to walk or transfer himself without assistance, but has remained working full-time from home.

Following the treatment, Gary experienced a significant reduction in fatigue and painful spasms, an improvement in thinking, memory, attention and hand function, and increased productivity at work. There was also reduced disease activity on his MRI brain scan. At the latest follow-up Gary also had improvement in leg movement.

Gary said the treatment enabled him to perform everyday tasks more easily such as actively assisting with showering, dressing and shopping, and spending more time with his son.

'It’s impossible to overstate the significance of the improvements I’ve enjoyed – whether you look at my work at Griffith University, time with family or resurgent social life, it’s been an amazing change for the better,' he said.

Professor Pender said that the symptom improvement was backed up by other evidence such as the reduction in disease activity on brain scans and reduction in antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid.

Professor Pender over the last 9 years has received over $1.2 million in funding via MS Research Australia's Project Grants. 'Treatments for progressive MS are one of the greatest needs,' commented Dr Matthew Miles, Chief Executive of MS Research Australia. 'We are delighted with the results of Professor Pender’s research and congratulate him on this outcome.'

This breakthrough study has profound implications globally for understanding the cause of MS and for the treatment of MS, particularly in its progressive phase, for which currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy.

A clinical trial is now needed to determine safety and therapeutic efficacy across the clinical spectrum of MS.

The full study can be viewed online at Multiple Sclerosis Journal
Anything with EBV in it is fascinating. People with infectious mononucleosis are at increased risk of getting either MS or ME/CFS....I think there's gotta be a connection - at least for some people. If you get IM later in life - as an adolescent - your immune system has a really hard time fighting it off. That may allow EBV to get deeper into the nervous system or the prolonged immune response could be the problem.

I didn't know it had been disproven, though. I think late onset EBV infection could be big in these diseases. An ME/CFS researcher just got a grant to study atypical EBV infections.
 
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Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
Anything with EBV in it is fascinating. People with infectious mononucleosis are at increased risk of getting either MS or ME/CFS....I think there's gotta be a connection - at least for some people. If you get IM later in life - as an adolescent - your immune system has a really hard time fighting it off. That may allow EBV to get deeper into the nervous system or the prolonged immune response could be the problem.

I didn't it had been disproven, though. I think late onset EBV infection could be big in these diseases. An ME/CFS researcher just got a grant to study atypical EBV infections.
The way they treat ebv is interesting by using the pts own immune system. I guess it could be used for the other viruses like cmv and hhv6.

But this study is showing ebv is damaging the nervous system which could be happening in a different way in cfsme compared to ms ??

Interesting though.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
The way they treat ebv is interesting by using the pts own immune system. I guess it could be used for the other viruses like cmv and hhv6.

But this study is showing ebv is damaging the nervous system which could be happening in a different way in cfsme compared to ms ??

Interesting though.
Yes, it would have to be damaging the nervous system in a different. I believe its the biggest most complex virus around or something like that. I imagine that it has many tricks up its sleeve.
 

Recliner

Member
Hey @Recliner
This has been arround for a while... It's kinda old news and there have been studies disproving it.
We can get on that "Big Pharma" vs "Simple Cure" subject though...

And I did a quick search on MS forums. I though he was not well seen but it seems people defend him.
Leave it to me to be grasping at straws again!
I guess this just seems logical to me... I have always thought that it has something to do with my brain and spinal fluid.
How wonderful it would be just to be able to widen some veins!
 

Recliner

Member
http://www.msra.org.au/QLD-breakthrough-progressive-ms

4th February, 2014


Professor Michael Pender

NEW Queensland research suggests that controlling Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection – the most common cause of glandular fever – may be beneficial in treating multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord affecting more than 23,000 Australians.

The study led by Professor Michael Pender with collaborators at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, and the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital describes a the use of a new treatment that boosts CD8 T cell immunity to EBV using a technique known as 'adoptive immunotherapy'.

While the treatment was conducted in a single person with secondary progressive MS, the promising results suggest that it could potentially be a useful treatment for progressive forms of MS and other chronic autoimmune diseases. There are currently no disease-modifying treatments available for progressive MS patients.

The researchers administered a six week treatment course to a 42 year old man with secondary progressive MS. The treatment had no adverse effects and within two weeks of commencing treatment the patient began to experience clinical improvement. These improvements were sustained up to the most recent follow-up 21 weeks later.

Results of the study were published today in the international Multiple Sclerosis Journal.

The treatment involves collecting immune cells known as T cells from the patient’s blood, growing them in the laboratory with an EBV vaccine and then transferring the cells back to the patient by intravenous infusion. The treatment was developed by Professor Rajiv Khanna of the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute to treat patients with EBV-related malignancy and does not require the use of any drugs.

This is the first use of this treatment, known as EBV-specific adoptive immunotherapy, to treat progressive MS.

Professor Pender said: 'The beneficial effect of boosting immunity to EBV by this treatment highlights the importance of impaired immunity to EBV in the development of MS. We believe the treatment corrects the impaired CD8 T cell immunity that allowed EBV infection to cause MS.'

The Brisbane patient, Mr Gary Allen, suffered what he now knows was his first MS attack in 1994 which led to a clinical diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS in 2000 and later progressed into secondary progressive MS. Since 2008 Gary has been unable to walk or transfer himself without assistance, but has remained working full-time from home.

Following the treatment, Gary experienced a significant reduction in fatigue and painful spasms, an improvement in thinking, memory, attention and hand function, and increased productivity at work. There was also reduced disease activity on his MRI brain scan. At the latest follow-up Gary also had improvement in leg movement.

Gary said the treatment enabled him to perform everyday tasks more easily such as actively assisting with showering, dressing and shopping, and spending more time with his son.

'It’s impossible to overstate the significance of the improvements I’ve enjoyed – whether you look at my work at Griffith University, time with family or resurgent social life, it’s been an amazing change for the better,' he said.

Professor Pender said that the symptom improvement was backed up by other evidence such as the reduction in disease activity on brain scans and reduction in antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid.

Professor Pender over the last 9 years has received over $1.2 million in funding via MS Research Australia's Project Grants. 'Treatments for progressive MS are one of the greatest needs,' commented Dr Matthew Miles, Chief Executive of MS Research Australia. 'We are delighted with the results of Professor Pender’s research and congratulate him on this outcome.'

This breakthrough study has profound implications globally for understanding the cause of MS and for the treatment of MS, particularly in its progressive phase, for which currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy.

A clinical trial is now needed to determine safety and therapeutic efficacy across the clinical spectrum of MS.

The full study can be viewed online at Multiple Sclerosis Journal
Here I thought this was new news !
I guess this just seems logical to me... I have always thought that it has something to do with my brain and spinal fluid.
Darn it!
How wonderful it would be just to be able to widen some veins!
Thank you for your article.
 

Recliner

Member
The way they treat ebv is interesting by using the pts own immune system. I guess it could be used for the other viruses like cmv and hhv6.

But this study is showing ebv is damaging the nervous system which could be happening in a different way in cfsme compared to ms ??

Interesting though.
Thanks to both of you for your responses. I thought I had something new here... I'm always on the lookout for new research. I guess, it keeps me from giving up.
Really interesting stuff from both of you. Thank you.
 

Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
Thanks to both of you for your responses. I thought I had something new here... I'm always on the lookout for new research. I guess, it keeps me from giving up.
Really interesting stuff from both of you. Thank you.

Just because someone here has heard of it doesnt mean others havent. You posting this thread has made it available to others to read and helps stimulate conversation. Dont let any thing hold you back from posting. We all learn from each other ;)
 

Strike me lucky

Well-Known Member
These viruses are not the cause of these diseases however, they are only reactivated because oxidative stress shuts down CD8 T Cell function.

http://m.jimmunol.org/content/172/2/989.short

The root of all autoimmune diseases is oxidative stress. Trying to fix it by any other means will only provide temporary relief.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12690629

Maybe its the infection causing all the oxidative stress. The amount of antioxidants cfsers take we should never have an issue with infections but that doesnt seem to be the case. Oxidative stress is a symptom just like inflammation.
 

RuthAnn

Well-Known Member
These viruses are not the cause of these diseases however, they are only reactivated because oxidative stress shuts down CD8 T Cell function.

http://m.jimmunol.org/content/172/2/989.short

The root of all autoimmune diseases is oxidative stress. Trying to fix it by any other means will only provide temporary relief.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12690629
So oxidative stress lowers the body's immune system and the viruses, bacteria, and fungi take advantage of it?

I saw that biotin might be really helpful for MS. Do you know how biotin would fit in the picture of ms?

When I can get my pain symptoms gone I most often still have the fatigue. It doesn't make sense that autoimmunity would cause fatigue. I can't figure out what it is about the oxidative stress that causes fatigue?? Do you have any insight on that part of it?
 
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RuthAnn

Well-Known Member
Here is an expansion on the use of biotin supplements for MS.

ATP deficiency due to mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress may be partly responsible for the progressive degeneration of neurons in MS (26). Given its role in intermediary metabolism and fatty acid synthesis (required for myelin formation) (see Function), it has been hypothesized that biotin might exert beneficial effects that would limit or reverse MS-associated functional impairments (26)
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
Maybe its the infection causing all the oxidative stress. The amount of antioxidants cfsers take we should never have an issue with infections but that doesnt seem to be the case. Oxidative stress is a symptom just like inflammation.
(First, oxidative stress and inflammation are the same thing)

There is a difference between the ROS created inside the phagocyte and outside of it (pollution, over eating, vitamin deficiency, genetics). Only ROS produced inside the phagocyte will kiil bacteria and virii. When ROS is high outside of the phagocyte it inhibits it from working. That is what they are saying in the article I linked to above. However, even ROS produced by phagocytes will make us feel ill AND kill bacteria. ROS produce outside of them will only make us feel ill (autoimmune disease).

Honestly, I do not see a lot of cfsers taking a lot of the right antioxidants, but it is more complicated than that. There is also diet and other environmental issues you have to change to lower ROS and you need to know YOURSELF, your own genetics.

But how many people here take high dose riboflavin or flavin mononucleotide? It is probably the most important cofactor for decreasing ROS because it is used to recycle glutathione (GSR).

If all of you are not taking extreme care to watch your omega 3 to omega 6 ratio you are only fighting a small part of the battle:
http://msj.sagepub.com/content/early/2015/08/20/1352458515604380.abstract
and
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10905544
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
So oxidative stress lowers the body's immune system and the viruses, bacteria, and fungi take advantage of it?

I saw that biotin might be really helpful for MS. Do you know how biotin would fit in the picture of ms?

When I can get my pain symptoms gone I most often still have the fatigue. It doesn't make sense that autoimmunity would cause fatigue. I can't figure out what it is about the oxidative stress that causes fatigue?? Do you have any insight on that part of it?
Yes, viri are able to proliferated when oxidative stress is high. That is why when people get stresses they will have cold sore out breaks.

Biotin plays a huge role in fatty acid synthesis which is important for building the myelin sheath that protects our nerves.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26327679

It might not be oxidative stress causing the fatigue. I would look closely at your omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid balance in your diet since these can effect neurotransmission.
 

RuthAnn

Well-Known Member
Yes, viri are able to proliferated when oxidative stress is high. That is why when people get stresses they will have cold sore out breaks.

Biotin plays a huge role in fatty acid synthesis which is important for building the myelin sheath that protects our nerves.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26327679

It might not be oxidative stress causing the fatigue. I would look closely at your omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid balance in your diet since these can effect neurotransmission.
I just was checking nutrition data and it looks like the easiest way to do 3:1 of 3 and 6 omega fatty acids is with fish and it should be fatty fish such as salmon. Besides taking a fish oil supplement that is.

Even butter doesn't have a good ratio. I didn't realize that. I didn't look into meat because I can't eat meat.

I've actually been wanting to eat raw salmon lately.

I will try to figure this out today. Thanks
 

Croatoan

Well-Known Member
I just was checking nutrition data and it looks like the easiest way to do 3:1 of 3 and 6 omega fatty acids is with fish and it should be fatty fish such as salmon. Besides taking a fish oil supplement that is.

Even butter doesn't have a good ratio. I didn't realize that. I didn't look into meat because I can't eat meat.

I've actually been wanting to eat raw salmon lately.

I will try to figure this out today. Thanks
Best to keep it 1 to 1:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12442909

You do not have to eat raw salmon, you can cook it. But also sardines and herring (kipper snacks) packed in water are great. I eat at least a can of sardines a day.

Good that you cant eat meat, but I am wondering why?
 

RuthAnn

Well-Known Member
Best to keep it 1 to 1:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12442909

You do not have to eat raw salmon, you can cook it. But also sardines and herring (kipper snacks) packed in water are great. I eat at least a can of sardines a day.

Good that you cant eat meat, but I am wondering why?
It must cause too much oxidative stress. I get headaches, insomnia, sore throat, joint pain, and this past time I tried to eat it I got a cold sore.

So you don't have to worry about damaging the fats in the fish? I've never tried sardines or herring. I have to admit I'm very sensitive to any fishy smell, usually when I eat fish I eat tilapia or tuna. I guess not very much fat in them, though.

Gee, I just looked up tilipia, and it has higher content of omega 6 than 3!
 
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RuthAnn

Well-Known Member
Honestly, I do not see a lot of cfsers taking a lot of the right antioxidants
I am wondering if this is what you mean when you say that?

Some things will act as antioxidants but get stuck with what they are antioxidizing in the tissue. For example, uric acid is said to be an antioxidant, but when it is also known to get stuck in the joints and cause pain.

Maybe glutathione antioxidizes without leaving behind some sort of damaging residual?
 

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