Wearables - Hope for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia?

Regarding Wearables and My Health

  • I use a wearable to monitor my activity levels

    Votes: 17 45.9%
  • I use a wearable to monitor my heart rate and/or heart rate variabiity l

    Votes: 22 59.5%
  • I use a wearable to monitor my sleep

    Votes: 17 45.9%
  • I use a wearable to monitor my brain waves

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I use a wearable to monitor something else

    Votes: 3 8.1%
  • I'm not using a wearable at this time but plan to

    Votes: 7 18.9%
  • I'm not using a wearable at this time and don't plan to

    Votes: 4 10.8%
  • If a wearable ME/CFS or FM study appeared I would probably participate

    Votes: 22 59.5%

  • Total voters
    37

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
What if you could tell before you were entering into a crash or flare that you were about to enter one? What if you had time to rest, take a treatment, employ calming techniques or whatever works for you before you unknowingly put yourself into a crash state? What if you were able to nip chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia in the bud before it got going?

That time may be coming. Proponents believe that wearables may end up being one of the great health advances of our times.

Precision

One of the great advantages of wearables is their precision. No longer are you tied to inaccurate population norms. Your baseline is no longer the average of thousands of people of mixed gender, age, race and health status. Your baseline is now your body.

That's important. We saw that for some people ferritin levels in the normal range are not normal at all for them - they’re low. Alzheimer's is thought to be unimprovable, but one UCLA Alzheimer's study improved cognitive functioning by optimizing test results using diet, exercise, supplements, behavioral changes and in some cases drugs. (Apple has developed health applications for its Apple Watch. (Fascimile by Justin - Wikimedia).

[fright]
White_AppleWatch_with_Screen.png
[/fright]Nor are people using wearables as dependent on twice or thrice yearly testing to determine what's happening in your body. Furthermore, wearables are an inexpensive (relative to other health costs) way of delivering real data.

With over 70 million devices sold over the past couple of years, wearables are a hot item. How hot perhaps no one suspected until Pebble's 2012 Kickstarter campaign to raise $100,000 for their initial smartwatch model ended a month later with the company raising a cool $10,266,844. (By December 2014 Pebble had sold its millionth smartwatch. In 2015 it raised another $20,000,000. After the Apple Watch cut into its sales, however, Pebble went bankrupt. Fitbit then snatched up Pebble's intellectual property rights; it's a competitive market).

Catching Diseases Early

We know that physiological changes probably begin occurring before you have any symptoms or at least any significant ones. Early life stresses, for instance, apparently institute physiological changes that take decades to come to fruition (in an illness). The immune changes that result in chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) appear to be set in motion by a flu-like event occurring just before an injury; it takes the combination of both to get that difficult illness started. Similarly, something unusual clearly happens after an infection in the bodies of many people with ME/CFS. We do know that the severity of an infection - measured mostly by symptoms - plays a key role. Doctors don't do cytokine panels and certainly don't trust symptom severity as a marker, but what if basic changes occur that could be picked up?

The wearables right now don't have the capacity to detect the more subtle changes occurring in those illnesses but they can detect shifts in heart rate, oxygen consumption, etc. Could those be enough to clue us in that an illness, perhaps even a potentially devastating illness, could be on the way? A recent Stanford study suggested that just might be the case.

The Study

PLoS Biol. 2017 Jan 12;15(1):e2001402. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2001402. eCollection 2017.
Digital Health: Tracking Physiomes and Activity Using Wearable Biosensors Reveals Useful Health-Related Information. Li X1, Dunn J1,2, Salins D1, Zhou G1, Zhou W1, Schüssler-Fiorenza Rose SM3,4, Perelman D5, Colbert E3, Runge R1, Rego S3, Sonecha R1, Datta S1, McLaughlin T5, Snyder MP1.

The Stanford researchers evaluated over 400 (400!) wearable devices (over 500 are available) and selected seven that have been validated in previous studies. One person wore all seven devices while the other 42 people in the study used the Basis I or Basis Peak Smartwatch. To date Stanford researchers have used the seven wearables to chart activity levels and steps taken, calories burned, heart rate, inflammation, insulin levels, skin temperature, sleep, oxygen consumption, radiation exposure and weight. The devices tested were:

  • Scanadu, iHealth-finger, Masimo - worn on the finger, pulse oximeters measure the amount of oxygen in the blood
  • The Basis 1 and Basis Peak Smartwatches were used to track heartbeat, motion, perspiration, skin temperature, ambient temperature, activity, and sleep. (All Basis Peak devices were recalled in Dec. 2016 because of an overheating problem and are no longer available)

The researchers applied algorithms that tracked elevated heart rates and skin temperature to attempt to predict illness onset. One person also took their oral temperature regularly and a psychomotor vigilance test that tests fatigue levels. Eighteen people participated in one part of the study that tracked the effects of airplane travel.

Frequent tests of c-reactive protein levels and/or glucose levels were taken in some participants to assess the ability of the wearable to pick up signs of inflammation and insulin resistance.

Results

We suggest that wearable devices may be a sensitive measure for detecting certain inflammatory responses, and that in some circumstances, these may even be better than participant-reported observations. The authors

Airplane flights are a major stressor for many people with ME/CFS and/or FM. The data collected suggested that reduced oxygen availability may be the reason why. As the planes hit higher altitudes blood oxygen levels dropped, sometimes to very low levels. Oxygen levels tended to rebound but intervals of very low oxygen (14.8%) were still seen. Statistical tests indicated that the reduced oxygen availability was correlated with self-reported fatigue levels in healthy people.

Inflammation is recognized as a contributor to many diseases including probably ME/CFS and fibromyalgia. Could the wearable detect signs of inflammation? The lab tests indicated that increases in heart rate and skin temperature were, in fact, associated with increased levels of inflammation (c-reactive protein). Because CRP is associated with all sorts of inflammatory issues from infection to autoimmune diseases to cancer, it's a very broad measure. The study suggested, though, that in general increased resting heart rates (not caused by exercise) are associated with inflammation - as perhaps many people with ME/CFS have suggested.

The most intriguing part of the study came when the devices proved to an effective early warning of incipient Lyme disease. One participant experienced symptoms but no bull's eye rash several weeks after visiting an area with Lyme disease. His reduced oxygen levels and elevated heart rate at the beginning of his long plane flight home were expected, but when they failed to normalize during the flight and when his heart rate remained elevated even after returning home, he suspected something else was up. Shortly after that he developed a cold. Tests later indicated that he'd been infected with the Lyme bacteria. The wearables indicated his body was reacting well before he developed symptoms.

[fright]
ECG.png
[/fright]An increased heart rate was the first sign of illness onset in every participant in the study who came down with a cold. Of course, some people with chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) use early morning resting heart rates to assess whether they should rest. Dr. Klimas uses increased resting heart rates upon awakening in her patients to determine if an ME/CFS/FM patient has done too much exercise or activity the day before.

Interestingly the only supplement or drug that seemed to influence inflammation were fish oil supplements. See more here.

Insulin resistance is another issue that may pop up in ME/CFS and fibromyalgia at some point given the difficulty exercising and studies showing high triglyceride levels. (Higher triglyceride levels, lower levels of high-density lipoproteins, and higher blood pressure are associated with insulin resistance). Plus the possible problems with glucose utilization suggested by recent metabolomics studies, sound, at least to this layman's ears, similar to the decreased uptake of sugar by muscle and fat cells found in insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance doesn't just increase one's risk of diabetes; in some people it contributes to cardiovascular disease, inflammation or other conditions, and it is common. A recent study suggested that poor diet and sedentariness contribute to insulin resistance in as much as 35 percent of the population of the United States.

Rather astonishingly, the researchers were also able to produce an algorithm that predicted which participants were insulin-resistant based on their number of daily steps, daytime heart rate and the difference between their daytime and nighttime heart rates. No less than sixty percent of the participants were insulin-resistant.

Given the possible mitochondrial problems in ME/CFS it's intriguing that a recent Stanford study found that a gene linked to insulin resistance also affects the mitochondria. Altering this gene in mice caused them to have difficulty exercising. Poorly functioning mitochondria appear, then, to be associated with insulin resistance (reduced glucose uptake).

While this study was probably the most comprehensive study to date of the effectiveness of wearables, it did not track heart rate variability. Other variables such as galvanic skin response, food intake and continuous glucose were tracked, however, and will be addressed in another publication.

Stanford and Precision Health

Stanford's MyHeartCounts smartphone app demonstrated that massive amounts of data can be collected using these apps. Almost 50,000 people enrolled in a study examining activity patterns within six months and 23andME's genomic data is being integrated into the study to provide genetic insights. An IPhone app is being used to study the effectiveness of drugs to increase activity in people with peripheral artery disease. In July Stanford will host the Big Data in Biomedicine Conference which is designed to "transform lives through precision health".

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) and Fibromyalgia

Tracking hundreds or even thousands of ME/CFS or FM patients to determine what is tweaking them (airplanes, activity, poor sleep, medications, environments) is certainly within reach. If increased heart rates are indicative of the beginning of an inflammatory event, might an anti-inflammatory drug or avoiding inflammation inducing foods be helpful? Do higher carbohydrate diets increase resting heart rates?

The chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) community is getting into the game. The Open Medicine Foundation has plans to collect data from many ME/CFS patients’ wearables.

The Bateman-Horne Institute is currently testing out the Oura ring that measures activity and sleep. Both Dr. Kogelnik of the OMF and the Solve ME//CFS Initiative are presenting at the World Precision Data Conference this month in Silicon Valley.

Wearables able to measure heart rate and/or heart rate variability and other measurements are already being used to inform about diet, exercise and treatment decisions on a personal level in some patients.

ME/CFS/FM studies could, by combining lab tests with wearable data, pick up disease and patient specific issues. Calorie, glucose, fat, and carbohydrate counters could delineate a subset of patients for whom carbohydrates cause inflammation. Galvanic skin response, heart rate and heart rate variability measurements could delineate patients with autonomic nervous system problems and conceivably link them to activity, sleep issues, diet, etc. EEG wearables could add brain wave changes into the equation.

That's just the tip of the iceberg. Other sensors, most of which are probably not on the market, have been developed to assess gait, sweat metabolite analysis, pH and calcium concentrations, lactate levels, blood flows and blood volume, one's heath status using tears, saliva sweat and others. Contact lenses have been developed that detect infections by measuring cytokine levels and textiles can measure cardiac functioning.

Could the shift from an acute pain state to a chronic pain state in FM be detected using brain wave monitors? Could savvy parents clap a wearable on a teenager suffering from a cold that would indicate that this time they REALLY, REALLY needed to rest? A creative use of wearables might be able to tell us much.

 
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Cecelia

Active Member
Flute and Mella's recent study showing a defect in glucose processing or utilization in those with ME/CFS is very exciting as it shows a relative breakdown in energy production which results in a detour and use of a back up plan which doesn't work nearly as well. Lactate is also produced which we know from other studies is found in excess in our muscles and brains. It causes aching in the muscles and brain fog, as I understand (and experience) it.

Anyway, this particular difficulty in glucose utilization may have seem analogous to what happens in insulin resistance, but it does not seem to me to be the same thing at all. Insulin resistance has different causes and consequences.

My concern is that these commercial devices are being designed and their data interpreted in terms of the more common health problems of insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension and the familiar kinds of cardiovascular disease that result.

We need devices that are suitable for monitoring the signs of our particular conditions and whose data will be properly interpreted in terms of what those signs and symptoms mean about our conditions. If any of the devices or their programming is this suitable, then I think they will benefit us, but it will be important to avoid the misdirection that can happen when something designed to detect one condition is used for a very dissimilar one.
 
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Tim Foley

Member
Great article, some of us are terrible at describing what happens to us during a typical day. A device would be a great way to relay information to our health care providers with less left for interpretation. Curious if any medical grade devices are available for rent since they are most likely pricey. Thanks for the article.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Flute and Mella's recent study showing a defect in glucose processing or utilization in those with ME/CFS is very exciting as it shows a relative breakdown in energy production which results in a detour and use of a back up plan which doesn't work nearly as well. Lactate is also produced which we know from other studies is found in excess in our muscles and brains. It causes aching in the muscles and brain fog, as I understand (and experience) it.

Anyway, this particular difficulty in glucose utilization may have seem analogous to what happens in insulin resistance, but it does not seem to me to be the same thing at all. Insulin resistance has different causes and consequences.

My concern is that these commercial devices are being designed and their data interpreted in terms of the more common health problems of insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension and the familiar kinds of cardiovascular disease that result.

We need devices that are suitable for monitoring the signs of our particular conditions and whose data will be properly interpreted in terms of what those signs and symptoms mean about our conditions. If any of the devices or their programming is this suitable, then I think they will benefit us, but it will be important to avoid the misdirection that can happen when something designed to detect one condition is used for a very dissimilar one.
Good point. I'm sure that these devices are aimed at well known disorders but hopefully we'll be able to piggyback on some of them by using lab tests to understand what they're showing in ME/CFS.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
I don't know but if some studies get approved they should include the price of the device in the study. I know the OMF is really busy right now but hopefully at some point they'll be able to get their wearables studies going. As I remember Dr. Kogelnik had some great ideas about how to do that.
Great article, some of us are terrible at describing what happens to us during a typical day. A device would be a great way to relay information to our health care providers with less left for interpretation. Curious if any medical grade devices are available for rent since they are most likely pricey. Thanks for the article.
 

AquaFit

Active Member
Do the researchers consider or recognize medication and chemical injuries amongst the "early life stressors" that "manifest later in illness"?



I'm surprised it was not acknowledged that chemicals in airplane air are the triggers of sick events, more than low oxygen. The cabin air comes from airflow in the jet engines. Often oil will leak into the airflow to a lessor or greater extent. Those of us who have been exposed to chemical (drugs, organophosphates, etc.) in early life will feel sick when others won't as our ability to detox has been compromised from that "early life" chemical "stressor".

A wearable that would indicate when we're reaching our toxic threshold would be fantastic. The theory that we can just sit down and rest and we'll feel better is incomplete as it does not consider that our heart rate may be increased because of a toxic exposure (airplane air, perfumes, meds) hours or days before. How best to detoxify from a toxic event in order to prevent heart failure and collapse for us would be extremely useful.


http://beatcancer.org/blog-posts/flying-and-aerotoxic-syndrome

http://aerotoxic.org/about-aerotoxic-syndrome/

Cort, would it be possible to start an adverse reactions to meds and specifically a cancer treatment adverse reaction section in the forums?
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Go
Do the researchers consider or recognize medication and chemical injuries amongst the "early life stressors" that "manifest later in illness"?



I'm surprised it was not acknowledged that chemicals in airplane air are the triggers of sick events, more than low oxygen. The cabin air comes from airflow in the jet engines. Often oil will leak into the airflow to a lessor or greater extent. Those of us who have been exposed to chemical (drugs, organophosphates, etc.) in early life will feel sick when others won't as our ability to detox has been compromised from that "early life" chemical "stressor".

A wearable that would indicate when we're reaching our toxic threshold would be fantastic. The theory that we can just sit down and rest and we'll feel better is incomplete as it does not consider that our heart rate may be increased because of a toxic exposure (airplane air, perfumes, meds) hours or days before. How best to detoxify from a toxic event in order to prevent heart failure and collapse for us would be extremely useful.


http://beatcancer.org/blog-posts/flying-and-aerotoxic-syndrome

http://aerotoxic.org/about-aerotoxic-syndrome/

Cort, would it be possible to start an adverse reactions to meds and specifically a cancer treatment adverse reaction section in the forums?
Good points. Just the chemicals in the air are certainly wearying and problematic to me...It would be great to build a room where small amounts of chemicals could be released in to the air and physiological (not symptomatic) changes could be charted. We could validate MCS right there.

We could do that if there was enough interest....It's certainly an important topic and would generate some interesting findings I think
 

tkinsf

Member
Detecting inflammation is not as interesting as predicting inflammation/sickness, for preventing PEM is paramount for CFS patients. PEM is triggered by particular motion/pace and wearables are not accurate enough to predict PEM in my experience. (HR and HRV hasn't been much of value to me either). Warables however gave me valuable insights about my patterns and progress. I'd definitely recommend fitbit as it allows you to access minute by minute data that you can do all kinds of analysis on.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Detecting inflammation is not as interesting as predicting inflammation/sickness, for preventing PEM is paramount for CFS patients. PEM is triggered by particular motion/pace and wearables are not accurate enough to predict PEM in my experience. (HR and HRV hasn't been much of value to me either). Warables however gave me valuable insights about my patterns and progress. I'd definitely recommend fitbit as it allows you to access minute by minute data that you can do all kinds of analysis on.
HRV analysis is not really helping you avoid crashes?
 

AquaFit

Active Member
Go
Good points. Just the chemicals in the air are certainly wearying and problematic to me...It would be great to build a room where small amounts of chemicals could be released in to the air and physiological (not symptomatic) changes could be charted. We could validate MCS right there.

We could do that if there was enough interest....It's certainly an important topic and would generate some interesting findings I think
Terrific, thanks for considering this Cort! Learner's planning on following up with you - I also suggested the blog link feature you offer...I know a few members have expressed they've had adverse reactions to Rituxamab. I wonder if tracking adverse med reactions...and finding out about prior exposure to anticholinergics and chemicals as well as asking about response to dietary or supplemental choline (and related supplements) could point a way which might help Ron Davis figure out how to help Whitney. That would be absolutely incredible. Whitney's last post on his blog stated he was looking forward to a new Stanford treatment...I wonder if his horrible state is an adverse reaction to that treatment.

Crossing my fingers interest will develop with some prompts from you if possible...oy, you're going to regret letting me in as a member! Such a pest I am!
 

pat0814

Member
I've been wearing a Fitbit HR for a few months but haven't found it to be useful because it does not alert you when/if your HR goes up. If you don't experience symptoms (which I don't) the only way to track it is to manually go in and check it on your phone. I also don't believe the readings are accurate. FB shows my normal resting HR to be somewhere in the 70's however, when I pull up a report, I see that it is sometimes in the 50's and sometimes goes up to 200+ numerous times during the day cumulatively for an hour or two. I wear an implanted portable HR monitor chip and it is not showing these same type of fluctuations. I check my sleep on FB as well and find that some of the FB reports show me "asleep" while I am actually eating dinner, otherwise active, or sitting up watching TV. All in all, I don't trust the readings and wouldn't rely on them even if you could set an alarm of some sort to alert you when your HR is high.
 

tkinsf

Member
HRV analysis is not really helping you avoid crashes?
No, not really. HRV was supposed to tell me when I'm in crash, but my data didn't show much correlation between HRV and how I felt. Maybe it requires medical grade equipment to really measure fatigue with HRV. I took mine with Polar HR7 and Elite HRV app over a period of a month. The best measure of how I felt was the amount of time spent resting in a day or my walking pace. Both showed over 80% correlation.
 

tkinsf

Member
I've been wearing a Fitbit HR for a few months but haven't found it to be useful because it does not alert you when/if your HR goes up. If you don't experience symptoms (which I don't) the only way to track it is to manually go in and check it on your phone. I also don't believe the readings are accurate. FB shows my normal resting HR to be somewhere in the 70's however, when I pull up a report, I see that it is sometimes in the 50's and sometimes goes up to 200+ numerous times during the day cumulatively for an hour or two. I wear an implanted portable HR monitor chip and it is not showing these same type of fluctuations. I check my sleep on FB as well and find that some of the FB reports show me "asleep" while I am actually eating dinner, otherwise active, or sitting up watching TV. All in all, I don't trust the readings and wouldn't rely on them even if you could set an alarm of some sort to alert you when your HR is high.
You're right, fitbit is not that accurate at all when it comes to instantaneous HR. Polar H7 is infinitely better choice if you are relying on HR to prevent crash. Much cheaper too. I use fitbit to download pace/calorie time series data and analyze its effect how I feel the next day.
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
Flute and Mella's recent study showing a defect in glucose processing or utilization in those with ME/CFS is very exciting as it shows a relative breakdown in energy production which results in a detour and use of a back up plan which doesn't work nearly as well. Lactate is also produced which we know from other studies is found in excess in our muscles and brains. It causes aching in the muscles and brain fog, as I understand (and experience) it.

Anyway, this particular difficulty in glucose utilization may have seem analogous to what happens in insulin resistance, but it does not seem to me to be the same thing at all. Insulin resistance has different causes and consequences.

My concern is that these commercial devices are being designed and their data interpreted in terms of the more common health problems of insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension and the familiar kinds of cardiovascular disease that result.

We need devices that are suitable for monitoring the signs of our particular conditions and whose data will be properly interpreted in terms of what those signs and symptoms mean about our conditions. If any of the devices or their programming is this suitable, then I think they will benefit us, but it will be important to avoid the misdirection that can happen when something designed to detect one condition is used for a very dissimilar one.
*My Glucose always sits at 3.7 even if I consume pure Powder Glucose daily it does not change the Normal range is actually 4.0+ they keep saying it is Normal well it is not...That is also seen in Hereditary Fructose Intolerance (HFI) low Glucose levels...If we are all in a hypo-metabolic state then everything will

be low even markers such as DAO in histamine intolerance as well...Japanese Researchers Published in Nov 2016 that Fibro is also involved with Auto-Immune Thyroid Disease (AITD) that alone can make metabolic system low, Hashimotos, Goiter etc. & another Team recently Published in Pub Med saying Ehlers-Danlos

Syndrome Hypermobility is Associated with Rheumatic Diseases by looking at thousands of electronic Medical files in patients. They mention RA, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Fibro, Osteoporosis this could explain why Rituximab helps it is used in RA Auto Immune disorders. :(
 
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tuha

New Member
Interesting. I was a professional football playeer. 5 years before developing ME/CFS I had to go to the hospital because I didnt feel good for some days - I had kind of heart weakness and faster heart beating. They did a really complex examination but they didnt find anaything important - they just said that I have tendency to tachycardia and that it´s good that I am doing sport. They said that it happens often whey you grow up (I was 16 that time). I had half a year those strange feelings but then it stoped and I forgot about. 5 years later I developed ME/CFS. If I doo too much now and I go through my energy limit I feel the same kind of heart weakness and fast heart beating like before. So I think that this was maybe the first signal that there is something wrong in my body and probably it was the first signal that I may develope ME/CFS later what unluckilly happened.
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
Interesting. I was a professional football playeer. 5 years before developing ME/CFS I had to go to the hospital because I didnt feel good for some days - I had kind of heart weakness and faster heart beating. They did a really complex examination but they didnt find anaything important - they just said that I have tendency to tachycardia and that it´s good that I am doing sport. They said that it happens often whey you grow up (I was 16 that time). I had half a year those strange feelings but then it stoped and I forgot about. 5 years later I developed ME/CFS. If I doo too much now and I go through my energy limit I feel the same kind of heart weakness and fast heart beating like before. So I think that this was maybe the first signal that there is something wrong in my body and probably it was the first signal that I may develope ME/CFS later what unluckilly happened.
*Some reports out now is the work of the Chernobyl expert have been submitted for Publication I am told it is Radiation Sickness I have also seen countless Positive to either Uranium or Plutonium the work is being done by Nuclear experts at McMaster University in Hamilton Ontario in 2002/03 the Chernobyl expert Published several

Papers on this link it has now been replicated by these Canadian experts. Gail Kanksy of The National CFIDS Foundation, President is funding this work now they are convinced they have found the Cause(s) David Bell (patient) is also now treating Chronic Radiation Syndrome close to Buffalo NY some say this

illness is the result of being
Poisoned by Antibiotics Quinoline types. WTF Knows. I doubt this method mentioned in this Post above will do anything for Patients it is just another long shot. The truth is forthcoming & Yes Lawsuits will eventually be filed in Courts of Law. We need a full Criminal Public Enquiry & full Compensation for

damages...I also wanted to mention Gail had over 300 blood samples sent to the top Leukemic expert in the World at Cairo University he developed a Cell line marker all 300+ samples were Positives to Leukemic Cell lines the work he was doing in his lab he was only able to correct about 95% of this Cell line he

needed 100% even an Israeli Oncologist tops in the World did not consider CFS an illness until he also was sent blood samples he changed his mind entirely he now knows it is tied to Leukemia as well. I have seen patients Die from (AML) Acute Myeloid Leukemia some have B Cell Lymphoma some have non-

Hodgkins. These are no doubts tied to RADIATION SICKNESS...We had 3 Mile Island, Chernobyl plus countless leaks across the globe & now we have Japan also causing Sickness. Governments know exactly what this illness is all about & it certainly is not so called Lyme or ebv cmv hhv-6 or hsv-1 b.s. Lies.
 
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