3rd Q&A Session with Younger Lab on Sept. 2, 2 pm CDT

On September 2 at 2 pm CDT, the UAB Younger Lab (Neuroinflammation Pain and Fatigue lab) will host the 3rd live Q&A Session on YouTube. The topic this time will be about the research at the lab, both present and future. Some questions that will be answered:

What research are you doing now?
What other diseases do you think you will research in the future?
What is the status of your current studies?
Are you starting a new study within the next 6 months?
What are your thoughts on research others are doing?

Here is the link to go to at that time: http://bit.ly/YoungerLabBroadcast You can submit pre-broadcast questions at jarredyoungerlab@gmail.com You can keep up with the pre-broadcast discussion at the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1579916175636787/?active_tab=posts. Feel free to share this.
 

Who Me?

Well-Known Member
I hope someone will be moderating chat. Last time someone totally ignored what Dr Younger was talking about to push his own agenda. It was really annoying.
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
I want to thank you for recommending the ibudilast and memantine. I'm taking the ibudilast and tolerating it very well. Still waiting for memantine to arrive.
 

Cort

Founder of Health Rising and Phoenix Rising
Staff member
Good luck with that!
I want to thank you for recommending the ibudilast and memantine. I'm taking the ibudilast and tolerating it very well. Still waiting for memantine to arrive.
G
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
Thanks Cort. I'm thankful for your site -the ibudilast has helped.

Have you written any posts on probiotics? I've been trying to determine which ones work. It's a lot harder to determine that than I thought. I know Culturelle has been studied, and the Lactobacillus GG is hardy, but it's only one strain. Reading reviews on Amazon are difficult, because some people say a probiotic works, others say it doesn't. So I've been trying to sort through all the reviews. The low-histamine ones may be more appropriate for those suffering from any of these health issues - just a guess on my part. I am surprised at just how many functions are controlled by bacteria in the gut.

People on Amazon have said that they've tested certain brands and they weren't viable. So it might make for a good topic to see which brands have been found to work.
 

Merida

Well-Known Member
A well- respected naturopath recommended Garden of Life, 14 probiotic strains. Can find it in refrigerator section of Whole Foods. I did not see any improvement, though - 1 month.

I did talk to a dairy farmer years ago who gave probiotics to his cows that were not doing so well. These 'sickly cows' improved so much that he started giving probiotics to the whole herd.
 

ShyestofFlies

Well-Known Member
I've heard "human strain" probiotics work much better than the strains most probiotics on the market use right now. I'm willing to try myself (they're called human strain because the original source for them was in the human gut removed by endoscopy and then bred in a lab many times so it has not actual human dna in it nor were they removed from a human recently.)


Some of what I have read on them sounds encouraging and they don't appear to cost much more than typical probiotics. A lot of people with IBS seem to find them at least somewhat useful. I've also heard you need to take prebiotics with probiotics to get the most effect, but I don't have the brain capacity to do much serious research on the subject at the moment.
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
A well- respected naturopath recommended Garden of Life, 14 probiotic strains. Can find it in refrigerator section of Whole Foods. I did not see any improvement, though - 1 month.

I did talk to a dairy farmer years ago who gave probiotics to his cows that were not doing so well. These 'sickly cows' improved so much that he started giving probiotics to the whole herd.
Thanks - it's good to get recommendations for a brand that's viable. But if it didn't work for you, then I wonder if the probiotics were dead. I tried a drink called Amasai - it is delicious! I got the mango. It's like kefir - but supposed to have 30 strains in it. I didn't feel anything though. That's interesting that a farmer fed it to cows! But the proof is there if they got well. I thought of giving my dog some, but have to research it. I wish there were regulations on probiotics, so consumers were certain they were getting what they paid for. I guess at some point I'm going to have to test them on my own.
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
I've heard "human strain" probiotics work much better than the strains most probiotics on the market use right now. I'm willing to try myself (they're called human strain because the original source for them was in the human gut removed by endoscopy and then bred in a lab many times so it has not actual human dna in it nor were they removed from a human recently.)


Some of what I have read on them sounds encouraging and they don't appear to cost much more than typical probiotics. A lot of people with IBS seem to find them at least somewhat useful. I've also heard you need to take prebiotics with probiotics to get the most effect, but I don't have the brain capacity to do much serious research on the subject at the moment.
I briefly came across info. on human-strains. I don't know much about them, but it's worth looking into. If you try one, can you post whether you noticed a difference on them? I'm wary of the soil-based organisms just yet, although if you look on Amazon a lot of people said they were the only product that works.

I wish sites would stop allowing product giveaways "for your honest and unbiased review." This may slant the reviews. Maybe Cort will put a place on here where people can post their real honest and unbiased reviews of what works and what doesn't. I suppose the results will still be variable given the differences in each individual's reactions, but at least we'd have an unbiased review system. I knew of a terrible doctor who had horrible online reviews, so she made her own website up, with alleged "all positive reviews" from "patients" - we knew they were made up. Reflective of the morals in the country now.

I hope everyone will post their own results of what worked for them. I'm researching specific strains that are anti-inflammatory. It's vast - I never knew how many body processes were regulated and influenced by the bugs in one's gut.
 

ShyestofFlies

Well-Known Member
I briefly came across info. on human-strains. I don't know much about them, but it's worth looking into. If you try one, can you post whether you noticed a difference on them? I'm wary of the soil-based organisms just yet, although if you look on Amazon a lot of people said they were the only product that works.

I wish sites would stop allowing product giveaways "for your honest and unbiased review." This may slant the reviews. Maybe Cort will put a place on here where people can post their real honest and unbiased reviews of what works and what doesn't. I suppose the results will still be variable given the differences in each individual's reactions, but at least we'd have an unbiased review system. I knew of a terrible doctor who had horrible online reviews, so she made her own website up, with alleged "all positive reviews" from "patients" - we knew they were made up. Reflective of the morals in the country now.

I hope everyone will post their own results of what worked for them. I'm researching specific strains that are anti-inflammatory. It's vast - I never knew how many body processes were regulated and influenced by the bugs in one's gut.
As of this week amazon is removing all such reviews supposedly, it will take time though. However- the websites that were setting up these programs now are telling people they have the "choice" to review a product they receive for free or at a steep discount, and they don't have to leave a disclaimer.

Honestly I prefer how it was before because at least I knew who got the item for free and to take their reviews with a grain of salt- plus they often posted the best pictures and videos of products so they weren't entirely useless to me.

Yeah we've been establishing a large link with inflammation, autoimmune, and many other issues with the gut. I mean size wise it would make sense that such a large part of our body does more than just one thing. Still we have a lot to learn. If you find any particular interesting anti-inflammatory strains send their names my way or post a thread.

I believe the review section for supplements is still availible (at least you can post the supplements info and leave a comment how it worked for you), but the doctor reviews are down.
 

Merida

Well-Known Member
Yes, I sure agree that the gut is extremely important, and very complex.I actually know what my basic gut problems are: I have a motor neuron dysfunction secondary to injury. But also, I have a long, redundant, tortuous colon that telescopes and probably does other contortions.

Also, rectocele, enterocele. I developed solitary rectal ulcer syndrome which finally convinced GI docs to scrap this dx of 'irritable bowel.' Yah, no wonder. This ulcer developed due to telescoping of the bowel. This telescoping could not be seen on multiple studies at a university hospital, but finally I got an ulcer. ( acupuncture healed it!!!! )

I spoke with a woman with a long tortuous colon who had a large section removed. She got very well and was able to completely stop her thyroid meds. Another woman had a laparoscopic look/ see related to infertility. The surgeon saw an abnormal band of tissue connecting her bowel to her ovary. He clipped it, and her bowel function completely normalized - she had had severe constipation her entire life.

In the literature : WA Fawcett et al. Immunodeficiency secondary to structural intestinal defects. Malrotation of the small bowel and cavernous hemangioma of the jejunum. Archives of pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. Vol 140, No.2, Feb 1986. Two little kids had severe immune problems, and many health issues, including suspected allergies and anemia. By 18 months after surgery both kids had totally normal immune function and were well.

I am just saying that the gut situation is complex. I suspect many of us have difficult to diagnose structural issues.
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
I c
As of this week amazon is removing all such reviews supposedly, it will take time though. However- the websites that were setting up these programs now are telling people they have the "choice" to review a product they receive for free or at a steep discount, and they don't have to leave a disclaimer.

Honestly I prefer how it was before because at least I knew who got the item for free and to take their reviews with a grain of salt- plus they often posted the best pictures and videos of products so they weren't entirely useless to me.

Yeah we've been establishing a large link with inflammation, autoimmune, and many other issues with the gut. I mean size wise it would make sense that such a large part of our body does more than just one thing. Still we have a lot to learn. If you find any particular interesting anti-inflammatory strains send their names my way or post a thread.

I believe the review section for supplements is still availible (at least you can post the supplements info and leave a comment how it worked for you), but the doctor reviews are down.
I can't believe Amazon is doing that! Yes it will make it worse for people looking for unbiased reviews - like you said - no disclaimers. Of course people will leave a review - so they will continue to have the free offers coming. I wonder why Amazon did that. I'm going to email them about it - I hope everyone does. Before buying products I would check the Amazon reviews. When reading someone's review, I'd read the bottom line first, to see if they got the item for free or at a reduced amount - if so, I'd skip to the next review.

I've been reading about how probiotics influence inflammation and autoimmune also. I'll post any particular strains I find that are supposed to work. Right now I'm researching anti-inflammatory strains.
 

cherubim

Well-Known Member
Yes, I sure agree that the gut is extremely important, and very complex.I actually know what my basic gut problems are: I have a motor neuron dysfunction secondary to injury. But also, I have a long, redundant, tortuous colon that telescopes and probably does other contortions.

Also, rectocele, enterocele. I developed solitary rectal ulcer syndrome which finally convinced GI docs to scrap this dx of 'irritable bowel.' Yah, no wonder. This ulcer developed due to telescoping of the bowel. This telescoping could not be seen on multiple studies at a university hospital, but finally I got an ulcer. ( acupuncture healed it!!!! )

I spoke with a woman with a long tortuous colon who had a large section removed. She got very well and was able to completely stop her thyroid meds. Another woman had a laparoscopic look/ see related to infertility. The surgeon saw an abnormal band of tissue connecting her bowel to her ovary. He clipped it, and her bowel function completely normalized - she had had severe constipation her entire life.

In the literature : WA Fawcett et al. Immunodeficiency secondary to structural intestinal defects. Malrotation of the small bowel and cavernous hemangioma of the jejunum. Archives of pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. Vol 140, No.2, Feb 1986. Two little kids had severe immune problems, and many health issues, including suspected allergies and anemia. By 18 months after surgery both kids had totally normal immune function and were well.

I am just saying that the gut situation is complex. I suspect many of us have difficult to diagnose structural issues.
I've never heard of motor neuron dysfunction - unless it is the same as MMS (I don't know the full name - it's when the bowel moves food along) I read that taking enteric-coated peppermint helps that. It's a shame - it sounds like it was the medical procedures that caused damage by telescoping. Be careful, since I read that people can catch hepatitis from scopes. Even though they clean them after scoping another person, there are parts that can't be cleaned. I think I'd look to conservative measures before invasive procedures.
 

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