Could alopecia be as simple as a zinc deficiency?

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
I will be looking at MTHF plus complex supplement when I'm ready. For the moment I have been focusing on reducing vitamin A intake, general nutritional supplements, as well as topical tomato juice (which contains trypsin inhibitors), as well as topical safflower oil (a non-comedogenic oil for maintaining skin moisurturisation), with fairly good results. However most hair restoration programs take around six or seven months to see much development so I've still got a long time to wait if anything significant is going to happen. In the meantime I am also looking at including some kind of terpene source in my diet to act as a retinoic acid receptor inhibitor.
TAllen on here found his issues were amino acids, thiamine & something else I forgot. Could you have a compression of your kidney vein because pulmonary thromboembolism/blood clots are involved with nutcracker syndrome,

maybe you can have your scans sent to your home or online, do not depend on any written results they likely missed this anyways the incompetents, imbeciles
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
I'm fairly certain that the combination of liver failure, heat stroke, and rhabdomyolysis, triggered abdominal compartment syndrome but try getting doctors to check you for that when their peers have spent a decade claiming that you're faking your condition. Compartment syndrome can pretty much result in the kind of things you are discussing. It doesn't seem to matter how many diagnoses and how much proof I've put to them regarding my condition they have all gone into protection mode. You should have seen the look on a respiratory specialists face when I showed him one of my blood test results showing that I had either experienced severe respiratory failure or nearly died from lack of oxygen, with a blood oxygen level of 16mm Hg. When the test had been done they just decided to ignore the result but he almost went into shock when he read it, sitting with his eyes and mouth wide open for a full minute before regaining composure. However he still chose to support the cover up. A couple of prior GP's have given me all of the relevant test results and information they've received and I have done my test to understand the scans I've received, reading the radiologists reports and so on when I had access to them.
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
I'm fairly certain that the combination of liver failure, heat stroke, and rhabdomyolysis, triggered abdominal compartment syndrome but try getting doctors to check you for that when their peers have spent a decade claiming that you're faking your condition. Compartment syndrome can pretty much result in the kind of things you are discussing. It doesn't seem to matter how many diagnoses and how much proof I've put to them regarding my condition they have all gone into protection mode. You should have seen the look on a respiratory specialists face when I showed him one of my blood test results showing that I had either experienced severe respiratory failure or nearly died from lack of oxygen, with a blood oxygen level of 16mm Hg. When the test had been done they just decided to ignore the result but he almost went into shock when he read it, sitting with his eyes and mouth wide open for a full minute before regaining composure. However he still chose to support the cover up. A couple of prior GP's have given me all of the relevant test results and information they've received and I have done my test to understand the scans I've received, reading the radiologists reports and so on when I had access to them.
She the GP/UK got well from this diagnosis once she had the proper tests also Rabdo can be a genetic illness I saw one video of a girl diagnosed genetic Rabdo.
The NIH test recently found was to do with some a familial genetic illness protein elevated they are going to do a clinical trial and the Oxford team also found an elevation I think in a protein funded by the ME Association...diagnostic test is coming.

The TAllen post was called on here was Thymosin Alpha One it would be bottom of last page he mentions what he is on 3 things, the special item he bought was a form of thiamine he mentions the brand & the 2 other things
 
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Baz493

Well-Known Member
My own rhabdomyolysis resulted from the combination of liver failure and the subsequent heat stroke. While I was never going to be attending any athletics championships I coped well with the army, practiced martial arts for most of my life, and regularly weight trained, so it certainly wasn't a genetic cause. The company I worked for was treating everyone like slaves during the final years before they closed the factory, resulting in near death accidents. They had me doing the work of two people because they didn't want to hire/train a permanent worker for the production line beside the one I was on. Two years of that and then 45C temperatures (inside the factory it was more like 50C), on top of toxic exposures, and I don't think my liver ever stood a chance. It was strange how the government contended that I had a right to receive workcover, after being left lying on the factory floor with heat stroke, yet my local hospital chose to deny me support or medical investigations; though they do have a terrible reputation.
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
The NIH found in ME/CFS & a woman with some _______ Familial genetic illness I do not recall the first word her family have the genetic illness. NIH found high levels of a protein called Phenylalanine
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
he took thiamine sachets 4mcg & amino acids & riboflavin. This was his issue.

I heard someone else collapse heat exhaustion they were later diagnosed with a benign insulinoma they needed surgery
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
It might help people with myalgic encephalitis if you are aware of this article, detailing autoimmune antibodies which destroy adrenergic receptors. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8474431/ That ties in with this article. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8101462/

I am currently looking at articles detailing relationships between low expression of retinoic acid receptors, resultant low levels of androgen receptors, and resultant low levels of opioid receptors, being causal factors at least several conditions involved in my own health.
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
It might help people with myalgic encephalitis if you are aware of this article, detailing autoimmune antibodies which destroy adrenergic receptors. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8474431/ That ties in with this article. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8101462/

I am currently looking at articles detailing relationships between low expression of retinoic acid receptors, resultant low levels of androgen receptors, and resultant low levels of opioid receptors, being causal factors at least several conditions involved in my own health.
His work seems to be going on & on constantly with no immediate answers, they all need to look more instead of biological to structural changes many have like Doppler scanning ultrasound nutcracker syndrome or spinal leaks, Chiari, pineal gland tumors this is where the focus should be.

I ended up in the Emergency room again left flank had stomach pain & my left kidney, left leg muscle outer thigh had blood flow issues & my heart was going tachycardia/ bradycardia was not found on 9 points ECG Afibrillation or PND found my lungs were infected mucus gave me 30+5 mg prednisone, asthma spray steroid salamol inhaler with Arythromycin 500mg antibiotics.

Mentioned my enlarged left kidney issues the pain was profound, lying on my stomach the pain shoots across my spine which is one of 2 areas of nutcracker syndrome...
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
I can't help but note Dr Ronald L Hoffman's comment on the poor standards of medical care in myalgic encephalitis. Ever since one of his books helped me to cure my trichloroethylene induced chronic fatigue I have looked to his work whenever some new health issue hits me but he doesn't seem to have answers regarding ME and I can't see any immediate research which is guaranteed to provide definitive answers at any time soon. There is just so much contention between all of the 'experts' over what the answers are.
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
I can't help but note Dr Ronald L Hoffman's comment on the poor standards of medical care in myalgic encephalitis. Ever since one of his books helped me to cure my trichloroethylene induced chronic fatigue I have looked to his work whenever some new health issue hits me but he doesn't seem to have answers regarding ME and I can't see any immediate research which is guaranteed to provide definitive answers at any time soon. There is just so much contention between all of the 'experts' over what the answers are.
If you could have the kidney issue it is reversible no doubts providing the right procedure is undertaken & also some were reversed with the proper blood thinner so maybe in some the surgery is not warranted it is not their cause
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
Actually I have been recently looking at retinoic acid activation of the MK gene, responsible for production of midkine protein. By binding to heparin the midkine increases the rate of blood clotting. As midkine may well be involved in my own lupus anticoagulant blood clotting I am hopeful that reducing my retinoic acid levels may help me to normalise my clotting issues. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6108788/
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
I finally found the articles which explain the specific pattern of male pattern baldness, overlying the galea aponeurotica. Fibroblasts aromatize the 3 alpha androstanediol resulting from high vitamin A intake, converting it into oestrogen. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-abstract/43/4/785/2684726?login=false The galea aponeurotica has high levels of fibroblasts so the region specific production of oestrogen beneath the hair loss alters the hair growth cycle, involving all subsequent events which I have previously described. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S027153172100052X
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
Apart from this are you diagnosed with ME/CFS Fibro Lyme Ehlers Danlos? I tested my urine once awake firt one positive to protein, next 3 during the day Positive tp protein, likely Orthostatic Proteinuria.

I need to purchase the blood sticks for urine blood theseare 2 of tests to confirm Nutcracker Syndrome & the 2 other tests are Doppler Ultrasound renal veins with Renal Veno scans. Ialso need to test for TB Latent form.

I spoke to the Doctors Secretary said ok to send my scans tests to the Author Doctor I believe I was born with both issues
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
I was never diagnosed with chronic fatigue despite having experienced it on two previous occasions (the first caused by trichloroethylene exposure and the second by bartonella infection after being scratched by a feral cat); the doctors were just so dismissive of the condition that they weren't interested in investigating anything. Doctors in my neighbourhood tend to be so lazy it's not funny. It would have been the same with my current fatigued condition if it hadn't been so disastrously bad, still incapacitating me after close to ten years, with current diagnoses of autoimmune myositis and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary disease (CTPD) despite medical opposition to any investigations. When I joined this site I was still looking for answers so have just maintained the thread and conversation since diagnosis since I've had to deal with some of the same issues as others here without help. I don't have ME, Fibro, Lyme, or ED. As for tests, I've already mentioned that it's pretty much impossible for me to get doctors to do anything now; they're determined to do whatever it takes to cover up for the mistakes of their peers and won't give me an inch. It actually took five years just to find the doctor who helped me to get the myositis diagnosis and his replacement, after he moved, helped me with the CTPD diagnosis but then gave up.
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
I have been primarily focused upon the role of cadmium and allergy on retinoid production from vitamin A in the pathogenesis of alopecia but the picture is incredibly complex. That includes the roles of cadmium on the microbiome https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37474038/ as well as zinc https://www.omicsonline.org/open-ac...m-the-literature-2161-069X-1000548-99439.html The connection between the gastrointestinal tract and the overall health of the body has been explored by numerous researchers. I have speculated on whether certain microbes might reduce cadmium intake or allergic response but I haven't yet seen the right set of research to be certain of anything except that specific patterns of microbes, inherited from our mothers, determine whether we are likely to develop alopecia and other health issues or not.
 

Baz493

Well-Known Member
This is a piece I wrote to someone I know suffering from PCOS and MCAS. It is extremely relevant to the thread as well as to people suffering from chronic fatigue.

I don't know whether this is the final piece in the puzzle of our conditions, since I've been certain before, but I think that it's the last piece that I will ever need. High intake of vitamin A causes hypothyroidism. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00394-022-02945-5 That's linked to PCOS https://www.verywellhealth.com/hypothyroidism-pcos-link-2616554 and alopecia https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326902 and MCAS https://www.palomahealth.com/learn/mast-cell-activation-syndrome-thyroid and irritable bowel syndrome https://www.verywellhealth.com/ibs-and-thyroid-disease-1944735 as well as to various forms of dermatitis and many other things I've been researching. Before you ask, zinc deficiency is also linked to hypothyroidism https://www.palomahealth.com/supplements/zinc-hypothyroidism and there also seems to be a fine line between hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer https://www.everydayhealth.com/thyr...idism/is-it-hypothyroidism-or-thyroid-cancer/ which can result from cadmium https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5983752/
Since I've previously covered multiple biological processes involved in these things I think it unnecessary to go into detail regarding what's happening but think it worth including this article which details causes of the condition which have been recognised by doctors (which don't include the factors I've mentioned). https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/symptoms-causes/syc-20350284
 

Aidan Walsh

Well-Known Member
I was in touch with the Doctor who had the kidney issue Surgery Nutctacker Syndrome done, she said she does not diagnose this it is for renal Doctors she said all the tests I have had thus far indicated including ultrasound abdomen & scans does not rule in/out NC she advised to ask my GP to do the morning & day proteinuria urine tests then do the Gold standard Color Doppler then onto veno tests, she said her paper has now opened up a list of patients in

London for Surgery she was very nice in her response I had asked if she could see me to come up there. She was also told she had FND like I was way back in 2012 I believe my compression is lying at the bottom of my spinal chord I have had this my entire life, one renal Surgeon Doctor agreed my left lopsided large kidney

Dromedary Hump & he actually read it as a Congenital Normal Variant, hers the same, its not the kidney hers was one inch up the right side of her left kidney a compressed NC. She also was Born with Latent TB passed on from Mother & treated prior to her Surgery they basically moved her left kidney to the right side she is well now.

I read one article it was also someones total Orthostatic issues & some could also become anemic with NC. The US ultrasound I had is Not the Gold standard test although it did find my enlarged kidney

She developed stenosis 3 months later & corrected it in another Surgery. She knew from her first Surgery in the Recovery room her symptoms were gone entirely. Tamara Keith, (author) I can assure you, there is nothing wrong with your kidney. This likely explains the thick blood flow Ron Davis Team is trying to put on an App test they also try to treat with baby Aspirin or blood thinners in some or one gains weight, in some it helps...
 

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Baz493

Well-Known Member
I was in touch with the Doctor who had the kidney issue Surgery Nutctacker Syndrome done, she said she does not diagnose this it is for renal Doctors she said all the tests I have had thus far indicated including ultrasound abdomen & scans does not rule in/out NC she advised to ask my GP to do the morning & day proteinuria urine tests then do the Gold standard Color Doppler then onto veno tests, she said her paper has now opened up a list of patients in

London for Surgery she was very nice in her response I had asked if she could see me to come up there. She was also told she had FND like I was way back in 2012 I believe my compression is lying at the bottom of my spinal chord I have had this my entire life, one renal Surgeon Doctor agreed my left lopsided large kidney

Dromedary Hump & he actually read it as a Congenital Normal Variant, hers the same, its not the kidney hers was one inch up the right side of her left kidney a compressed NC. She also was Born with Latent TB passed on from Mother & treated prior to her Surgery they basically moved her left kidney to the right side she is well now.

I read one article it was also someones total Orthostatic issues & some could also become anemic with NC. The US ultrasound I had is Not the Gold standard test although it did find my enlarged kidney

She developed stenosis 3 months later & corrected it in another Surgery. She knew from her first Surgery in the Recovery room her symptoms were gone entirely. Tamara Keith, (author) I can assure you, there is nothing wrong with your kidney. This likely explains the thick blood flow Ron Davis Team is trying to put on an App test they also try to treat with baby Aspirin or blood thinners in some or one gains weight, in some it helps...
Hopefully that provides you with the answer you need. I won't deny some interest as I have a compressed artery on top of each of my feet and think it's a distant possibility that I might have the same but for now I'm limited to my own efforts to try to fix my condition. I have to admit to hoping that improving my thyroid function will fix many health issues, including vascular problems.
 

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