IrisRV

Well-Known Member
I think I posted on another thread regarding scoliosis... Time for a poll! But then I poked around this afternoon and couldn't figure out how to start a poll. Doh!
Great idea! It could be a very interesting poll. :)

Here's how you do it. Go to an appropriate subforum. This one might be good. Click Start a New Thread. Down at the bottom of that page is everything you need to start a thread with a poll. Good luck! I look forward to seeing this poll.
 

Lissa

Well-Known Member
Great idea! It could be a very interesting poll. :)

Here's how you do it. Go to an appropriate subforum. This one might be good. Click Start a New Thread. Down at the bottom of that page is everything you need to start a thread with a poll. Good luck! I look forward to seeing this poll.

Excellent! Thanks so much for the advice! I will look into it tomorrow when I'm more up to it. :D
 

Merida

Well-Known Member
@Lissa
Poll is a great idea. I have a whole bunch of questions. Like: who has left-handedness in themselves or their families- parents, siblings, aunts, uncles? Scoliosis? One side of face slightly smaller ( can detail characteristics)? temporomandibular dysfunction? One leg shorter.? Foot / toe issues: hammer toes, bunions, overlapping toes?
Also : high- arched palate? Torqued tailbone? Cervical ribs? Extra vertebrae? Incomplete vertebrae? There is a lot to this, and most people have not looked closely.

The reason that structure and function has not been addressed with proper double blinded studies is that no one is funding this. In the 1930s the American Medical Association declared that structure has nothing to do with function. They were feeling quite threatened by the rise of chiropractic, and just wanted to put an end to the whole business.

@Victor Maalouf
There are several sources that are very important for you to read : The Downside of Upright Posture by Michael Flanagan, DC - a chiro with training in neurology, and also physical anthropology - skull design/ fluid dynamics in the brain. He has a web site,too.
Also: Chiropractic: The Anatomy and Physiology of SacroOccipital Technique by Jonathan Howatt, DC, DICS
Also: Scoliosis and Spinal Pain Syndrome by Professor Dr. Valentyn Serdyuk - orthopedic surgeon/ researcher at Odessa University.

These 3 books will give you an in depth understanding of the complex nature of the issues you bring up.

But there is more: I think that the whole problem may be from genes which control symmetry/ asymmetry in our bodies. Think you will find that many of us have malrotation/ malattchment of the gut. This may be the root cause of the scoliosis and the torque in the neural tube - from the sacrum to the brain. There is a lot to this. also, about 11per cent of people have an off midline fusion of the filum to the dura - in the sacrum . important!
Whew.
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
@Victor Maalouf
There are several sources that are very important for you to read : The Downside of Upright Posture by Michael Flanagan, DC - a chiro with training in neurology, and also physical anthropology - skull design/ fluid dynamics in the brain. He has a web site,too.
Also: Chiropractic: The Anatomy and Physiology of SacroOccipital Technique by Jonathan Howatt, DC, DICS
Also: Scoliosis and Spinal Pain Syndrome by Professor Dr. Valentyn Serdyuk - orthopedic surgeon researcher at Odessa University.
Some expensive books. I'm in debt right now from feeding myself during my recovery and researching/writing/compiling all of this. So I can't do expensive stuff at the moment.

Generally, I'm not too impressed with chiropractic, but I know its effectiveness depends largely on the skill and experience of the practitioner. I was intensively studying personal training when I came down with all this, and I do need to get back into researching specific mechanics.


But there is more: I think that the whole problem may be from genes which control symmetry/ asymmetry in our bodies. Think you will find that many of us have malrotation/ malattchment of the gut. This may be the root cause of the scoliosis and the torque in the neural tube - from the sacrum to the brain. There is a lot to this. also, about 11per cent of people have an off midline fusion of the filum to the dura - in the sacrum . important!
Whew.
There are definitely genetic predisposers to these syndromes, but I don't believe they play that large of a role. The main reason is that the vast majority of stories I've analyzed have common patterns of activities and injuries that lead up to this structural dysfunction. It doesn't just happen on its own.
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
Great! Do it. Just so you know -- it's poor research to go into your study claiming your hypothesis is the absolute truth. Actually, it's not even poor research, it's not scientific research at all if you set out to prove your hypothesis. That's not the way it works. You're supposed to test the hypothesis, not set out to confirm it. Going in "knowing" your hypothesis is the absolute truth is very, very bad scientific practice.
That wouldn't be bad science, just design limitations. You can't design a physical therapy technique that is blinded. The practitioner will necessarily have some expertise and will to help the person. The practitioner can go in "knowing" he will help the patients, but the assessment will be objectively done by outside observers.

Your hypothesis, which you continue to state as a conclusion, is at lease falsifiable and easily so. Your statement that every single person with mecfs, fibro, and chronic Lyme have these structural patterns is easily proved false by showing a single person with one of those conditions who does not have the pattern.

Your statement that this is The Cure for all these conditions is also easily falsifiable by finding a single person with one of those conditions who gets the treatment and is not completely cured.

That should make any valid scientific research you do fairly simple. It takes only one case to prove your hypothesis wrong and you're done.
Oh really? Tell me, what are ME/CFS, Fibro, and chronic Lyme? Are they consistently measurable? Do they have reliable objective diagnostic criteria? Absolutely not. Not yet at least.

Say you find a few people out of hundreds with CFS/ME/FM/Lyme-like symptoms and no structural abnormalities. What keeps you or me from saying, "Well then they're the ones who don't actually have it!"

I'm trying to match symptoms that are mostly subjective to objective observations. There is intrinsically much grey area. These symptoms present as a wide spectrum. Rarely will you ever find 2 people exactly the same. Maybe if you could wave a wand and instantly correct structural abnormalities, then people can be instantly full cured. But the body doesn't work that way. As there is a spectrum of frequently-changing degrees of severity, so too will recovery be a spanning of that spectrum.


You can find all the confirming observations you want, they don't prove your absolute statements. No amount of research can prove that structural abnormalities are the single cause, that correcting that abnormality is the single cure, or that every single PWC has the abnormality. Unless you look at every single case, there's always the possibility that one of the cases you have not looked at disproves your universal generalization.
That's like saying despite us observing the Sun rise every day, that doesn't mean it will rise tomorrow. True, but useless thought experiment. Or if we had a statement, "horses have four legs," and a horse is born with 3 legs, does that completely wipe out the reasonableness of our statement? NOW WE CAN NEVER SAY HORSES HAVE 4 LEGS BECAUSE 1/100,000 WAS BORN WITH THREE.

It's just nit-picky semantics.

On the other hand, if you (as several of us have suggested) take a more moderate approach, such as "Treating such and such an abnormality in PWCs leads to relief of such and such symptoms in a majority of patients", that would be a more sensible hypothesis. You identify an unbiased sample set of sufficient size. You treat them. You record and report the degree of success. If the majority of patients get relief from the specified symptoms, then your hypothesis is proved. If a majority do not, your hypothesis is disproved.
How would that be unbiased? As you well know, the identification of PWCs and diagnostic criteria has been massively controversial for years.

Yeah of course that's what the end-result of research would probably look like, but my purpose is not to take a "moderate" approach. That would just result in me sounding uncertain and pussy-footing my arguments. That's just not my style, babe!
 
Last edited:

IrisRV

Well-Known Member
That's just not my style, babe!
How dare you! Don't you call me 'babe'. I am not your 'babe'. I am no kind of baby at all. That is incredibly sexist and demeaning.

I am not tolerating your condescension and insulting attitude. I don't take in the real world and I don't take it online. I hope others will also not tolerate you speaking to other members in that condescending manner.

Do you call your mother 'babe'? Your grandmother? I hope you don't treat them with that kind of disrespect.
 
Last edited:

IrisRV

Well-Known Member
Out of the right mouth, “baby” and “honey” are terms of endearment. One of my best friends always sends me text’s that say “love ya sweetie” and my mom always calls me “honey,” but coming out of the mouth of a relative stranger these words take on a completely different meaning. They’re insults disguised as compliments, a vocabulary wolf in sheep’s clothing. It’s infantilizing–I mean, you might call a five year old “honey,” but to anyone old enough to wear big-girl clothes, it’s degrading.
your-waitress-is-not-a-baby-200x167.jpg

She’s a grown woman. NOT a baby. |Source: Shutterstock
Naturally, this name calling is a phenomenon that only happens to females. Could you even imagine calling a guy you didn’t know “Babe” in casual conversation? Or referring to the man interviewing you for a job as “Cutie?” Nooooo!!! We would never do that, because it would be unprofessional and seen as insulting. So, why I ask is it okay for the opposite sex? It gives a false sense of intimacy to a total non-relationship. We are not friends, we are not a couple, you probably don’t even know my name, so I’m thinking cutie-honey-sweetie-baby is not an appropriate moniker.
Don’t call me baby (or any of those other names!)–even if you say it with the best of intentions. It’s demeaning and insulting even if you say it with a smile
Read more: http://www.gurl.com/2012/04/12/dont-call-me-baby/#ixzz45Iz8Z3Do
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
How dare you! Don't you call me 'babe'. I am not your 'babe'. I am no kind of baby at all. That is incredibly sexist and demeaning.

I am not tolerating your condescension and insulting attitude. I don't take in the real world and I don't take it online. I hope others will also not tolerate you speaking to other members in that condescending manner.

Do you call your mother 'babe'? Your grandmother? I hope you don't treat them with that kind of disrespect.
Chillaaaaaaax. I knew you wouldn't take it well since you have such an emphasis on correctness, though I don't mean disrespect, just more casual playfulness. I can feel the tension radiating from you through the interwebs in how you post.

Yeah I've called my mom "babe" a few times. And sister other things along those lines. I didn't say you were my babe.

I'm about to make the video explaining how to recover, and you highlight point. That is, the ability to relax and not let what others say get to you. Eliminate fear, self-censorship, be unapologetic and not judge yourself, because these mental restrictions create unnecessary body tension, which slows progress. Although, I'm proud of you for lashing out at me ;)

And by the way, don't think I missed you and Who Me?'s passive aggressive unicorn fart cure post, which, by the way, IS HILARIOUS! You guys put a lot of thought into some of those posts.
 
Last edited:

Merida

Well-Known Member
Wait a minute, EVERYONE!! We all need to support each other through this complex mess !! Of course we all have a lot of anger built over the years we have lost and the craziness in our lives, but releasing it on each other is harmful to all concerned.

So, let's switch direction. I plan to do this : Spend one minute sending thoughts of healing and wisdom to each person in this discussion. Victor . . . This means you, too !!!

Victor, many of the important ideas are found on Dr. Flanagan's site : https://uprightdoctor.wordpress.com
My initial injury was from a chiropractor - first visit ever for sore hip. Was completely bedridden one year. Probable spinal cord injury, possible dissection of vertebral artery, so . . . However, some groups of chiros have made important contributions. Much of their work is based on the great osteopaths, like Sutherland.

May All that is Good, and Strong, and Beautiful Bless us and guide us to complete health.
 

Veet

Well-Known Member
Yeah of course that's what the end-result of research would probably look like, but my purpose is not to take a "moderate" approach. That would just result in me sounding uncertain and pussy-footing my arguments. That's just not my style, babe!
Chillaaaaaaax. I knew you wouldn't take it well since you have such an emphasis on correctness, though I don't mean disrespect, just more casual playfulness. I can feel the tension radiating from you through the interwebs in how you post.
I'm about to make the video explaining how to recover, and you highlight point. That is, the ability to relax and not let what others say get to you. Eliminate fear, self-censorship, be unapologetic and not judge yourself, because these mental restrictions create unnecessary body tension, which slows progress. Although, I'm proud of you for lashing out at me ;)
3dnnon.gif
express7.gif
 

Paw

Well-Known Member
Ugh, please, Victor, you're "proud" of her? You "knew" your infantilizing term of address would not be well-received, but you said it anyway?

Seems to me that what you perceive as your no-pussyfooting "style" has been a rationale for controlling or manipulative impulses -- not great for productive discussion. You're pleased that you maybe evoked stress in someone because that illustrates some sort of Zen point you think she needed to hear? This isn't EST, it's a community forum, where a small dose of civility and empathy goes a lot further than power-plays.

And please don't admonish me to "chillaaaaaaax." Trust me, I would not benefit from your lesson; I would simply not read your posts or comments anymore. You're investigating one piece of the puzzle, as we all are. Hopefully your perspective won't be drowned out by your style.

Sorry, Merida, I will now proceed with healing thoughts.
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
Victor, many of the important ideas are found on Dr. Flanagan's site : https://uprightdoctor.wordpress.com
My initial injury was from a chiropractor - first visit ever for sore hip. Was completely bedridden one year. Probable spinal cord injury, possible dissection of vertebral artery, so . . . However, some groups of chiros have made important contributions. Much of their work is based on the great osteopaths, like Sutherland.
Vertebral artery dissection sounds pretty extreme. Sounds like that was a long time ago. Do you remember any thoracic work done on yourself? For a while I thought the apparent relation between CFS/ME and skiing was from falls, but part of it may be from excessive torsion forces that meet in the thoracic region.

What caused the sore hip? Can you describe what it felt like?
 

Merida

Well-Known Member
@Victor Maalouf
Check out Neurosurgeon Wouter Schievink at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in L.A. He is a leader in thinking about/ treating arterial dissection, and thinks this may a lot more common than appreciated. But it isnot getting diagnosed. Also, the most common serious chiro neck injury is vertebral artery dissection. I had all the symptoms.

Yes, I had a thoracic injury, too,( 1998) as he pounded in my thoracic spine. Could barely inhale for 3 days. I am still very 'out' at the cervical- thoracic junction. No one seems to know what to do to align this area. I think that the thoracic problem is what keeps my neck from correcting better. Hence, atlas is still unstable. Hence, poor CSF drainage, possible poor blood flow, cranial nerve symptoms, dysautonomia. So, I think your observations on this thoracic problem are very important.

Another thing that gradually happened over a period of 4-5 years post injury is that my jaw rotated and retracted. Then, I developed a TMJ problem. Not much pain, but tremor, tightness, odd bite. Saw the expert in America, I think -, Dr. Brendan Stack in Virginia. A university trained / research craniofacial dentist. My MRIs showed that my discs ( in the TMJs) had slipped inward instead of the usual forward slippage. He commented that people like me usually have neuro symptoms and not much pain. The others have a lot of pain, not many neuro symptoms. Please go to You Tube and look at the videos Brendan Stack has posted. Pretty amazing. Sorry I can not seem to copy and paste with this iPad.

There is an entire chapter in the SacroOccipital book on the cranial dental sacral complex. Brilliant stuff. I want to share all of this with you - with everyone. Trying to figure out how. Think we would all benefit from appreciating how the central nervous system functions, and how it interfaces with the musculoskeletal system.

I believe that my sore hip resulted originally from a sacral torque from birthing my 9 pound son. I was susceptible to this because of mild scoliosis - runs in the family - some people are severe. Had some night time hip pain on and off over 15 years. Not bad. Took a yoga class and tried to do a lotus position - pushed on my right leg, as it wouldn't go in position. Got very sore, and hip made 'popping sensation' when rotating it. Friend suggested a chiropractor - I had never been as I had never had any neck or back pain. That was the end of life as I knew it -18 years ago.

I do have an article in Fibromyalgia Frontiers ( 2008), " Pelvic and Sacral Instability: A Facet of Fibromyalgia ? " Got a great note from Dr. Alan Pocinki on that article. " Kudos on your excellent and thought provoking article."
Pelvic / sacral issues manifest as : short-leg, hips that are not level, possible sciatic involvement - pain in buttocks and down leg, knee pain, discomfort when sitting ( one sacral segment actually 'unlocks' when sitting), gait anomalies, low-back pain, hip pain of all varieties. But also, the sacrum/pelvis influences the neck and cranial movement/cranial bones.

I hate to go on too much more, as am repeating earlier posts. And this detailed structural stuff is not of interest to all. Plus, I do not know how the structure part interfaces with the viral part. I think people could have structural issues, but be okay except for a virus or other infection. Maybe we can talk??? So glad you are getting well !!!
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
Another thing that gradually happened over a period of 4-5 years post injury is that my jaw rotated and retracted. Then, I developed a TMJ problem. Not much pain, but tremor, tightness, odd bite. Saw the expert in America, I think -, Dr. Brendan Stack in Virginia. A university trained / research craniofacial dentist. My MRIs showed that my discs ( in the TMJs) had slipped inward instead of the usual forward slippage. He commented that people like me usually have neuro symptoms and not much pain. The others have a lot of pain, not many neuro symptoms. Please go to You Tube and look at the videos Brendan Stack has posted. Pretty amazing. Sorry I can not seem to copy and paste with this iPad.
Yup. I noticed I had some jaw asymmetry when I was a teenager, but it worsened after my more recent injuries. My bottom row of teeth began pressing up against the back row. My noticeable TMJ symptoms have been gone for a long time now. Jaw is much more symmetrical and stronger now. No more clicking/crackling unless I'm making significant progress.

I've seen indications that Tourettes and Parkinsons are also musculoskeletally-rooted, though I haven't focused much time on the labels and decided not to deal with them now. Dr. Stack's videos appear to give that some credence.

I believe that my sore hip resulted originally from a sacral torque from birthing my 9 pound son. I was susceptible to this because of mild scoliosis - runs in the family - some people are severe. Had some night time hip pain on and off over 15 years. Not bad. Took a yoga class and tried to do a lotus position - pushed on my right leg, as it wouldn't go in position. Got very sore, and hip made 'popping sensation' when rotating it.
That is SUPER interesting. Two excerpts from my paper;

"During the stretching regime suggested by my doctors, my right chest tore even more, making it much worse, loose and more painful. One day after doing hip and core exercises, while cooking at my stove, I slightly twisted to the right and felt a pop in front of my right hip, then again a few minutes later. In the next few days I began feeling more debilitated and drained. My hip grew increasingly unstable, painful and tiring to walk on. As I walked it felt like my hip was lurching anteriorly and laterally out of its socket."

Another recounting
"I tried stretching and strengthening. Figuring my right hip and core were weak, I worked on them. Bad idea. The day after some significant hip work, while cooking at a stove, I turned slightly, and felt a small pop in the front side of my right hip. It worried me, but I had felt similar pops before, and thought it was like a knuckle crack or something. But then another slight twist, and another pop.

That day marked the plummeting into relentless pain and fatigue. I saw a hip specialist, thinking I developed Femoroacetabular Impingement. An x-ray showed some growth on my femur and what looked like a chip of bone floating in between, but the specialist said it wasn’t enough to cause FAI."


I never got an MRI to figure out exactly what happened with my hip. I was pretty ticked at how useless doctors were by that point. My guess is that those pops were small tearing of my glute medius or minimus wrapping around.

I do have an article in Fibromyalgia Frontiers ( 2008), " Pelvic and Sacral Instability: A Facet of Fibromyalgia ? " Got a great note from Dr. Alan Pocinki on that article. " Kudos on your excellent and thought provoking article."
Pelvic / sacral issues manifest as : short-leg, hips that are not level, possible sciatic involvement - pain in buttocks and down leg, knee pain, discomfort when sitting ( one sacral segment actually 'unlocks' when sitting), gait anomalies, low-back pain, hip pain of all varieties. But also, the sacrum/pelvis influences the neck and cranial movement/cranial bones.
I can't find your article. The thing is, what actually started to fix my hip pain was stretching out my left "forward collapsed" shoulder. Once I got into my intuitive stretching routine, I repetitively experience many times relief in my hip aggravation and misalignment to only come from stretching out that shoulder. Its collapse was generating twisting forces that spiraled down through my core into my opposite hip. My shoulder damage and instability also occurred before my hip popping.

So, I would guess that your right shoulder would be the one that tends to be more "forward collapsed" and the side you tend to lean your thoracic cage towards. I would also guess that your left shoulder is more restricted and weaker than your right, but you may have more pain and discomfort in your right side, particularly in your chest/rib cage. And if you have popping/click in your jaw, it's on your right side. That's the general pattern I see in others with these syndromes. Are you left-handed? Do the seems in your shirt drift down your right shoulder more than your left? I'm guessing the chiropractor pressed on the right side of your back?
 
Last edited:
Yup. I noticed I had some jaw asymmetry when I was a teenager, but it worsened after my more recent injuries. My bottom row of teeth began pressing up against the back row. My noticeable TMJ symptoms have been gone for a long time now. Jaw is much more symmetrical and stronger now. No more clicking/crackling unless I'm making significant progress.

I've seen indications that Turrets and Parkinsons are also musculoskeletally-rooted, though I haven't focused much time on the labels and decided not to deal with them now. Dr. Stack's videos appear to give that some credence.


That is SUPER interesting. Two excerpts from my paper;

"During the stretching regime suggested by my doctors, my right chest tore even more, making it much worse, loose and more painful. One day after doing hip and core exercises, while cooking at my stove, I slightly twisted to the right and felt a pop in front of my right hip, then again a few minutes later. In the next few days I began feeling more debilitated and drained. My hip grew increasingly unstable, painful and tiring to walk on. As I walked it felt like my hip was lurching anteriorly and laterally out of its socket."

Another recounting
"I tried stretching and strengthening. Figuring my right hip and core were weak, I worked on them. Bad idea. The day after some significant hip work, while cooking at a stove, I turned slightly, and felt a small pop in the front side of my right hip. It worried me, but I had felt similar pops before, and thought it was like a knuckle crack or something. But then another slight twist, and another pop.

That day marked the plummeting into relentless pain and fatigue. I saw a hip specialist, thinking I developed Femoroacetabular Impingement. An x-ray showed some growth on my femur and what looked like a chip of bone floating in between, but the specialist said it wasn’t enough to cause FAI."


I never got an MRI to figure out exactly what happened with my hip. I was pretty ticked at how useless doctors were by that point. My guess is that those pops were small tearing of my glute medius or minimus wrapping around.


I can't find your article. The thing is, what actually started to fix my hip pain was stretching out my left "forward collapsed" shoulder. Once I got into my intuitive stretching routine, I repetitively experience many times relief in my hip aggravation and misalignment to only come from stretching out that shoulder. Its collapse was generating twisting forces that spiraled down through my core into my opposite hip. My shoulder damage and instability also occurred before my hip popping.

So, I would guess that your right shoulder would be the one that tends to be more "forward collapsed" and the side you tend to lean your thoracic cage towards. I would also guess that your left shoulder is more restricted and weaker than your right, but you may have more pain and discomfort in your right side, particularly in your chest/rib cage. And if you have popping/click in your jaw, it's on your right side. That's the general pattern I see in others with these syndromes. Are you left-handed? Do the seems in your shirt drift down your right shoulder more than your left? I'm guessing the chiropractor pressed on the right side of your back?

Right, so I have a list of symptoms that I keep saved on my phone as they've gotten too many to count. Below are those which resonate with your theory and prompted my reply herein:

-Pain immediately under left ribcage
-Needle-like pain on upper side of both shoulders below neck.
-Clicking hip and pain in left hip
-left lower back Pain

Thing is though, my "syndrome" began at age 5.

Your educated opinion Victor?
 

Merida

Well-Known Member
Victor,
You are exactly right . My right shoulder drops and leans. It also pops. Not much pain yet. I have a huge lipoma on the top left shoulder. My Mom had the opposite pattern. She was left -handed. I am right handed. Yes, my jaw hits on the right side much more.

I can rotate my pelvis ( hula hoop style) and my neck will crack like crazy. The chiro pretty much thrashed my whole body, with twisting and pushing. For someone with a torque already, this was devastating. He did do X-rays and noted that my sacrum was slanting ( ha! The autocorrect changed this to 'chanting' ) and that I had small sacral foramina - lower 2 sets of 'holes.' Called : hypodevelopment of the sacrum.

Okay find Eric Dalton. www.erikdalton.com Brilliant guy - Ph.D. Phys. Therapy. Read about the torqued coccyx and more. It is reported that a tucked torqued coccyx can take down the entire nervous system. Of course regular doctors do not have a clue. Neither did I until I traveled to Hell. Yes, my coccyx is twisted to left side.

More important stuff: Cort posted an article : Shortness of filum terminale represents an anatomical specific feature in fibromyalgia : a nuclear magnetic resonance and clinical study. Roberto Mantia et al. This can be found free on line easily. Also, famous neurosurgeons ( Hansasuta, Tubbs, Oakes - university of Alabama) published that 3 out of 27 'normal' cadavers had a filum fused off midline. So, there it is : the torque may begin early in fetal development due to asymmetrical fusion of the foundation of the whole freaking dural tube. Plus, the whole system is tighter than it should be due to short filum.

Another part:in fetal development (4-6-8 weeks ) the intestines are also forming. First, they are outside in the umbilical cord. Then they rotate 270 degrees counterclockwise and move back into the abdomen and attach to the abdominal wall. There are errors of rotation and attachment, which can be very serious, or not so bad. This kind of phenomenon can lead to a volvulus ( or intestinal twist) at some point in life. Interesting we had 4 surgeries/ 1 death ( my dear friend) for intestinal volvulus in support group. hmmmm.

After much research, I learned that a redundant, tortutous, long colon is felt by some to also be a result of a fetal gut malrotation. Gee, I have one! Dx on colonoscopy. But consider this : We take 20,000 breaths a day. What happens when you have a gut that is longer and has more attachment on one side of the abdomen? Yes, you have a chronically inbalanced core. How is this related to neural tube torque and scoliosis?

I wrote to the online Scoliosis research group about this. They still do not understand what causes idiopathic scoliosis - 85per cent of the cases. They peer-reviewed and published my comment . Scoliosis 2009, 4:28. "intestinal malrotation." Corresponding author : Keith M Bagnall. And me. There was no discussion as there has been no research.

Must stop here. Sure everyone is bored and asleep except Victor and me. Thank you, again, Victor. Let's crack this thing and get the research done. After being bed-ridden near death for a year (. 1998-99) I got up and declared, before the Universe, that I was going to understand everything about this monster, this curse, this gift?this great mystery that has plagued my family and others for generations. And the virus thing is related, somehow.
My grandmother lost 4 out of 7 kids to virus problems, and a sister. My son was very sick for a long time.

Blessings and hugs to all who travel this path of Great Mystery. May we all be enlightened and brought to understanding.

P. S. The jaw issue is important. We should start a thread on this. I have info.
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
Right, so I have a list of symptoms that I keep saved on my phone as they've gotten too many to count. Below are those which resonate with your theory and prompted my reply herein:

-Pain immediately under left ribcage
-Needle-like pain on upper side of both shoulders below neck.
-Clicking hip and pain in left hip
-left lower back Pain

Thing is though, my "syndrome" began at age 5.

Your educated opinion Victor?
Yeah same as me except opposite side. Mine really became noticeable at age 10, though it might have begun before that. A picture of when I was a toddler indicated these patterns might have been present even then. But particularly after 10 the right side of my body weakened and my endurance and concentration gradually began to slide, largely progressively worsening through high school and college until I finally crashed at 25.

If you touch the pain under your ribcage you'll find it's very tender. But then if you press all around below your ribcage and sternum on both sides, the entire area will be tender, particularly if you try digging your fingers underneath your ribs. Much of it is your diaphram. It all needs to be released. If you hold pressure in those areas, you'll eventually feel muscle twitching and releasing.

There will be muscle tension all around your hip, which can be released similarly, very progressively. But if your right shoulder is collapsed forward like my left, my hip pain and weakness only improved when I made progress stabilizing that shoulder. Alternating with the other.

I'm about to release a general video explaining the process, but only few specifics. I don't know when I'll be making specific explanations. Soon hopefully, but I'm returning the camera I'm borrowing tomorrow.
 

Victor Maalouf

Active Member
Another part:in fetal development (4-6-8 weeks ) the intestines are also forming. First, they are outside in the umbilical cord. Then they rotate 270 degrees counterclockwise and move back into the abdomen and attach to the abdominal wall. There are errors of rotation and attachment, which can be very serious, or not so bad. This kind of phenomenon can lead to a volvulus ( or intestinal twist) at some point in life. Interesting we had 4 surgeries/ 1 death ( my dear friend) for intestinal volvulus in support group. hmmmm.

After much research, I learned that a redundant, tortutous, long colon is felt by some to also be a result of a fetal gut malrotation. Gee, I have one! Dx on colonoscopy. But consider this : We take 20,000 breaths a day. What happens when you have a gut that is longer and has more attachment on one side of the abdomen? Yes, you have a chronically inbalanced core. How is this related to neural tube torque and scoliosis?
Yes, that is interesting. I have had an imbalanced abdomen for a long time. Everyone has asymmetries in their organs: heart, liver, pancreas, intestinal tract. But apparently this structural asymmetry can happen both ways, and be almost exactly mirrored, like how I had everything @Jon_Tradicionali has, except the opposite side. Another reason I'm so focused on the shoulders is because I had IBS, even for years before my crash, always alternating between constipation and diarrhea, then frequently being exhausted for 30 minutes afterwards and have to lie down. That progressively got better as I've made progress, and has been completely gone for a while now.

There were many moments where I triggered extreme abdominal pain and IBS immediately after making some significant progress stretching that left shoulder of mine. The pain was always very reminiscent of "stomach flues" I got when a kid. Then, pressing the tight musculature around my abdomen and releasing it was the only way to fairly quickly alleviate the pain.


Let's crack this thing and get the research done. After being bed-ridden near death for a year (. 1998-99) I got up and declared, before the Universe, that I was going to understand everything about this monster, this curse, this gift?this great mystery that has plagued my family and others for generations. And the virus thing is related, somehow.
My grandmother lost 4 out of 7 kids to virus problems, and a sister. My son was very sick for a long time.

Blessings and hugs to all who travel this path of Great Mystery. May we all be enlightened and brought to understanding.
Indeed. Crashing hard, being almost completely debilitated... can a very triggering experience. I basically decided I was dead, because I knew I would have never survived in the wild hundreds/thousands of years ago like that. So I became a ghost, observing everything and turning my life into an experiment.

P. S. The jaw issue is important. We should start a thread on this. I have info.
Go for it.
 

Get Our Free ME/CFS and FM Blog!



New Threads

Forum Tips

Support Our Work

DO IT MONTHLY

HEALTH RISING IS NOT A 501 (c) 3 NON-PROFIT

Shopping on Amazon.com For HR

Latest Resources

Top